Complex: Here’s the ‘Smart Ring’ NBA Players Will Wear to Monitor COVID-19 Symptoms While in Orlando

Complex: Here’s the ‘Smart Ring’ NBA Players Will Wear to Monitor COVID-19 Symptoms While in Orlando. “Included in the NBA’s plan to restart the 2019-2020 season at Walt Disney World in Orlando is that players will be given the option to wear Oura smart rings to detect if and when they begin showing symptoms of COVID-19.”

TechRepublic: As COVID-19 quarantines continue, US residential power consumption changes

TechRepublic: As COVID-19 quarantines continue, US residential power consumption changes. “As millions of US residents work from home and stay at home under COVID-19 pandemic quarantines, electrical power generation companies are responding by adjusting power schedules to meet a different set of power needs. Part of what’s helping to make those changes are the latest automated digital smart meters used in homes and small businesses, which are allowing power companies to respond to changing power usage patterns in real time.”

South China Morning Post: Hangzhou park security uses AI-powered smart glasses to detect people with fever

South China Morning Post: Hangzhou park security uses AI-powered smart glasses to detect people with fever. “Roving security staff at Hongyuan Park, part of the Xixi Wetland preserve in Hangzhou in eastern China, now have the power to quickly detect the body temperature of all park visitors from a distance of up to 1 metre, thanks to ‘non-contact thermal augmented reality’ smart glasses supplied by AI start-up Rokid Corp.”

CNET: Fever-tracking smart thermometers may trace the spread of COVID-19

CNET: Fever-tracking smart thermometers may trace the spread of COVID-19. “COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus responsible for a global pandemic, has some telltale symptoms, including fever. A network of smart thermometers made by health tech company Kinsa has produced an eye-opening view of how fevers are spreading across the US.”

Northeastern University: Understanding when smart speakers mistakenly record conversations

Northeastern University: Understanding when smart speakers mistakenly record conversations. “Voice assistants such as Amazon’s Alexa, OK Google, Apple’s Siri, and Microsoft’s Cortana are becoming increasingly pervasive in our homes, offices, and public spaces. While convenient, these systems also raise important privacy concerns—namely, what exactly are these systems recording from their surroundings, and does that include sensitive and personal conversations that were never meant to be shared with companies or their contractors? These aren’t just hypothetical concerns from paranoid users: there have been a slew of recent reports about devices constantly recording audio and cloud providers outsourcing to contractors transcription of audio recordings of private and intimate interactions.”

Wired: Hackers Could Use Smart Displays to Spy on Meetings

Wired: Hackers Could Use Smart Displays to Spy on Meetings. “Add another entry to the list of internet-connected devices causing problems in unexpected places. Touchscreen smart TVs from DTEN, a ‘certified hardware provider’ for popular video conferencing service Zoom, have flaws that hackers could use to essentially bug conference rooms, lift video feeds, or nab notes written on the device’s digital whiteboard. Just one more reason to hate long meetings.”

Ars Technica: Apple, Google, and Amazon team up to create “CHIP,” a new smart home standard

Ars Technica: Apple, Google, and Amazon team up to create “CHIP,” a new smart home standard. “Apple, Google, Amazon, and the Zigbee Alliance have all teamed up to make a new smart home standard. The new working group went live today under the name of ‘Project Connected Home over IP’ with announcement blog posts from Google, Apple, Zigbee, and a new website, connectedhomeip.com.”

TechCrunch: Now even the FBI is warning about your smart TV’s security

TechCrunch: Now even the FBI is warning about your smart TV’s security. “Smart TVs are like regular television sets but with an internet connection. With the advent and growth of Netflix, Hulu and other streaming services, most saw internet-connected televisions as a cord-cutter’s dream. But like anything that connects to the internet, it opens up smart TVs to security vulnerabilities and hackers. Not only that, many smart TVs come with a camera and a microphone. But as is the case with most other internet-connected devices, manufacturers often don’t put security as a priority.”

Techdirt: Whirlpool Left Appliance Data, User Emails Exposed Online

Techdirt: Whirlpool Left Appliance Data, User Emails Exposed Online. “Another day, another shining example of why connecting everything from your Barbie dolls to tea kettles to the internet was a bad idea. This week it’s Whirlpool that’s under fire after a researcher discovered that the company had failed to secure a database containing 28 million records collected from the company’s ‘smart’ appliances. The database contained user email addresses, model names and numbers, unique appliance identifiers, and data collected from routine analysis of the appliances’ condition, including how often the appliance is used, when its off or on, and whether it had any issues.”

Digital Trends: Google VP says guests should be informed if you have smart devices in the home

Digital Trends: Google VP says guests should be informed if you have smart devices in the home. “Consumer privacy is a tightrope act that no company has quite managed to nail down and that some seem to have given up on. In a recent interview with the BBC that followed Google’s event in New York, Rick Osterloh, the senior vice president of devices and services, said that homeowners might want to consider disclosing the presence of smart devices before they invite guests into their home.”

Mashable: The Vatican wants you to pray with this smart rosary

Mashable: The Vatican wants you to pray with this smart rosary. “The Catholic Church is taking a page out of Silicon Valley’s playbook: inventing gadgets in hopes of attracting devoted followers. The Click to Pray eRosary is a smart wearable device from the Pope’s Worldwide Prayer Network, a Vatican organization that mobilizes Catholics to ‘address the challenges facing humanity’ through prayer. “

Ars Technica: Protocol found in webcams and DVRs is fueling a new round of big DDoSes

Ars Technica: Protocol found in webcams and DVRs is fueling a new round of big DDoSes. “Hackers have found a new way to amplify the crippling effects of denial-of-service techniques by abusing an improperly implemented tool found in almost 1 million network-connected cameras, DVRs, and other Internet-of-things devices.”

CNET: Google’s smart home ecosystem is a complete mess

CNET: Google’s smart home ecosystem is a complete mess. “If Google’s own smart home products act like embarrassed step-siblings, many erstwhile Works with Nest gadgets seem like they won’t even visit for the holidays anymore. And it’s not their fault: It turns out Google is a terrible parent.”

Z6 Mag: ‘Orvibo’ Smart Home Devices Leaked 2 Million Users’ Exact Geolocation

Z6 Mag: ‘Orvibo’ Smart Home Devices Leaked 2 Million Users’ Exact Geolocation. “More than 2 million records have been compromised due to an unsecured online database that contains sensitive information, including the precise location of the devices manufactured by Orvibo, a smart-home manufacturing company. Orvibo, a China-based tech company that manufactures more than 100 products and smart systems for homes, hotels, and offices including remote home monitoring, alarm systems, and entertainment devices.”

Engadget: Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks

Engadget: Samsung tweet suggests scanning your smart TV for malware every few weeks. “This morning a Samsung customer support account tweeted an odd warning that, to prevent malicious software attacks on your smart TV, you should scan it for viruses every few weeks. It even included an instructional video to help you do so. The tweet, first spotted by The Verge, was short lived. Samsung has since removed it, but it existed long enough to raise a few red flags.”