The Register: UK.gov emits draft IoT and smartphone security law for Parliamentary scrutiny

The Register: UK.gov emits draft IoT and smartphone security law for Parliamentary scrutiny. “A new British IoT product security law is racing through the House of Commons, with the government boasting it will outlaw default admin passwords and more. The Product Security and Telecommunications Infrastructure (PSTI) Bill was introduced yesterday and is intended to drive up security standards in consumer tech gadgetry, ranging from IoT devices to phones, fondleslabs, smart TVs, and so on.” I got the meaning from context but I still looked up fondleslab.

CNET: Mozilla’s holiday guide rates tech gifts for privacy practices

CNET: Mozilla’s holiday guide rates tech gifts for privacy practices. “Santa isn’t alone in keeping an eye on you this holiday season. Nearly a third of the 151 popular connected gifts analyzed by the Mozilla Foundation as part of its annual ‘Privacy Not Included’ shopping guide didn’t meet basic standards for digital security and privacy, the digital rights group said Tuesday.”

Mashable: Your cute pet camera may hide a troubling secret

Mashable: Your cute pet camera may hide a troubling secret . “The pet accessory business is a booming one, predicted to reach $46 billion by 2026. A growing part of that market is dog and cat cameras: remotely accessible webcams designed to monitor, and sometimes interact with, pets left at home. Think of pet cams as baby monitors, but for furry friends. But as with so many internet-of-things devices, pet cameras come with their own privacy and security risks.”

JFTC starts another antitrust probe against Apple and Google on smart devices: Report (ZDNet)

ZDNet: JFTC starts another antitrust probe against Apple and Google on smart devices: Report. “According to Nikkei, the Japanese competition watchdog will conduct interviews and surveys with OS operators, app developers, and smartphone users to assess whether Apple and Google have created anti-competitive market conditions in the smartphones, smartwatches, and other wearables sectors.”

Mashable: Facebook’s Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses are just an overpriced influencer toy

Mashable: Facebook’s Ray-Ban Stories smart glasses are just an overpriced influencer toy. “…unlike Google Glass with its small screen and internet connectivity, there’s no promise of a futuristic, wearable computer here. Facebook’s newest bit of hardware comes with such a comically limited and shoddily executed feature set for the price that it’s hard to take it seriously as a product at all. This is just an expensive toy for influencers seemingly designed to make Facebook look ‘cool’ again, built for a world where ‘Stories’ are now widely known as ephemeral and easily forgotten snippets of our social media lives.”

Wall Street Journal: Smartwatches Track Our Health. Smart Toilets Aren’t Too Far Behind.

Wall Street Journal: Smartwatches Track Our Health. Smart Toilets Aren’t Too Far Behind. . -10,000 points for not using the headline SILICON VALLEY POO-POO’S SMART DEVICES. “Toilet makers say that their products can provide medical-grade results for some vital signs and urine tests, but a smart toilet that can analyze the broader chemical makeup of waste is likely further off. Developers will have to work out how to prepare samples for analysis and refill the chemicals needed to run the reaction, as well as make the toilet cost-effective, biochemists and diagnostic experts say. Another key barrier is privacy.”

Mashable: Philips Hue smart lights can now react to your Spotify songs

Mashable: Philips Hue smart lights can now react to your Spotify songs. “On Wednesday, Signify — a Philips spinoff that manufactures lighting products — announced that Philips Hue lightbulbs are now integrated with Spotify. This includes an algorithm that analyzes the metadata of each song you play on the music streaming platform, in real time, in order to make the lights ‘dance’ to the music.”

Newswise: New cell phone and smart watch models can interfere with pacemakers and defibrillators

Newswise: New cell phone and smart watch models can interfere with pacemakers and defibrillators. “After reports of smart phone and watch interference with implanted medical devices, investigators affiliated with the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) at the US Food and Drug Administration conducted a study that supports the FDA recommendation that patients keep any consumer electronic devices that may create magnetic interference, including cell phones and smart watches, at least six inches away from implanted medical devices, in particular pacemakers and cardiac defibrillators.”

Wired: Hackers Could Increase Medication Doses Through Infusion Pump Flaws

Wired: Hackers Could Increase Medication Doses Through Infusion Pump Flaws. “FROM pacemakers and insulin pumps to mammography machines, ultrasounds, and monitors, a dizzying array of medical devices have been found to contain worrying security vulnerabilities. The latest addition to that ignoble lineup is a popular infusion pump and dock, the B. Braun Infusomat Space Large Volume Pump and B. Braun SpaceStation, that a determined hacker could manipulate to administer a double dose of medication to victims.”

Wired: Millions of Web Camera and Baby Monitor Feeds Are Exposed

Wired: Millions of Web Camera and Baby Monitor Feeds Are Exposed. “A VULNERABILITY IS lurking in numerous types of smart devices—including security cameras, DVRs, and even baby monitors—that could allow an attacker to access live video and audio streams over the internet and even take full control of the gadgets remotely. What’s worse, it’s not limited to a single manufacturer; it shows up in a software development kit that permeates more than 83 million devices, and over a billion connections to the internet each month.”

PR Newswire: GE Appliances and Google Sign Multi-Year Deal to Build Next-Gen Smart Home Appliances (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: GE Appliances and Google Sign Multi-Year Deal to Build Next-Gen Smart Home Appliances (PRESS RELEASE). “The two companies will work together to develop the next generation of smart appliances with Google Cloud Vision AI. And GEA will benefit from Google Cloud’s seamless integration with other Google platforms and technologies such as Android and Google Assistant.”

National Institute of Standards and Technology: Common Solar Tech Can Power Smart Devices Indoors, NIST Study Finds

National Institute of Standards and Technology: Common Solar Tech Can Power Smart Devices Indoors, NIST Study Finds . “We usually think of solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells fixed to roofs, converting sunlight into electricity, but bringing that technology indoors could further boost the energy efficiency of buildings and energize swaths of wireless smart technologies such as smoke alarms, cameras and temperature sensors, also called Internet of Things (IoT) devices. Now, a study from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) suggests that a straightforward approach for capturing light indoors may be within reach.”

Ubergizmo: Fire Exit Locks Recalled After Faulty Firmware Prevents Them From Opening

Ubergizmo: Fire Exit Locks Recalled After Faulty Firmware Prevents Them From Opening. “Doors open and close, and almost never do they fail to do that unless there’s something physically preventing it from happening. However, that doesn’t seem to be the case with around 2,400 fire locks that have been recalled in the US. This is because due to faulty firmware, it prevented the doors from opening.”