Cornell Chronicle: Smart thermostats inadvertently strain electric power grids

Cornell Chronicle: Smart thermostats inadvertently strain electric power grids. “Smart thermostats – those inconspicuous wall devices that help homeowners govern electricity usage and save energy – may be falling into a dumb trap. Set by default to turn on before dawn, the smart thermostats unintentionally work in concert with other thermostats throughout neighborhoods and regions to prompting inadvertent, widespread energy-demand spikes on the grid.”

NewsWise: Operating a ‘smart home’ by breath control

NewsWise: Operating a ‘smart home’ by breath control. “Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have created a simple prototype device that enables users to control ‘smart home’ technology by changing their breathing patterns. The self-powered unit fits into the nostrils and has the potential to enhance the quality of life for people with limited mobility or inability to speak clearly. It also can be programmed provide automatic alerts to medical personnel if an individual has trouble breathing.”

Ars Technica: Insteon finally comes clean about its sudden smart home shutdown

Ars Technica: Insteon finally comes clean about its sudden smart home shutdown. “Smart home company Insteon and its parent company, Smartlabs Inc., suddenly disappeared last week. In what will probably be remembered as one of the most notorious smart home shutdowns ever, Insteon decided to turn off its cloud servers without giving customers any warning at all, surprise-bricking many smart home devices that relied on the Insteon cloud.”

Rehabilitation and Community Providers Association: New “Smart Homes Made Simple” Website is Live!

Rehabilitation and Community Providers Association: New “Smart Homes Made Simple” Website is Live!. “We hope this website will serve as a hub of information where members of the disability and aging communities, as well as service providers, housing professionals, and technology consultants, can learn how to integrate smart home technology into the homes of people with disabilities and older adults for greater independence, autonomy, safety, and accessibility.”

Ars Technica: Apple, Google, and Amazon team up to create “CHIP,” a new smart home standard

Ars Technica: Apple, Google, and Amazon team up to create “CHIP,” a new smart home standard. “Apple, Google, Amazon, and the Zigbee Alliance have all teamed up to make a new smart home standard. The new working group went live today under the name of ‘Project Connected Home over IP’ with announcement blog posts from Google, Apple, Zigbee, and a new website, connectedhomeip.com.”

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently

The Conversation: Truly smart homes could help dementia patients live independently. “The growing number of people with dementia is encouraging care providers to look to technology as a way of supporting human carers and improving patients’ quality of life. In particular, we want to use technology to help people with dementia live more independently for as long as possible.”

Z6 Mag: ‘Orvibo’ Smart Home Devices Leaked 2 Million Users’ Exact Geolocation

Z6 Mag: ‘Orvibo’ Smart Home Devices Leaked 2 Million Users’ Exact Geolocation. “More than 2 million records have been compromised due to an unsecured online database that contains sensitive information, including the precise location of the devices manufactured by Orvibo, a smart-home manufacturing company. Orvibo, a China-based tech company that manufactures more than 100 products and smart systems for homes, hotels, and offices including remote home monitoring, alarm systems, and entertainment devices.”

CNET: Google Assistant, Nest Hub Max and all the rest of the smart home news from Google I/O 2019

CNET: Google Assistant, Nest Hub Max and all the rest of the smart home news from Google I/O 2019. “The dust is settling now that the Google I/O developer conference is nearing its end. At this point, we’re unlikely to see any more surprises, but the announcements from the show could make a big difference for the future of Google’s smart home offerings.”

Techdirt: Smart Lock Vendors Under Fire For Collecting Too Much Private Data

Techdirt: Smart Lock Vendors Under Fire For Collecting Too Much Private Data. “Like most internet of broken things products, we’ve noted how ‘smart’ door locks often aren’t all that smart. More than a few times we’ve written about smart lock consumers getting locked out of their own homes without much recourse. Other times we’ve noted how the devices simply aren’t that secure, with one study finding that 12 of 16 smart locks they tested could be relatively easily hacked thanks to flimsy security standards, something that’s the primary feature of many internet of broken things devices.”

TechCrunch: GE adds a bunch of Google Assistant-friendly smart home products

TechCrunch: GE adds a bunch of Google Assistant-friendly smart home products . “At the Pixel 3 event back in October, the company announced that its C by GE bulbs were the first to carry Made by Google certification with Home functionality built-in right out of the box. At CES this year, the company will show a bunch more products, effectively tripling the size of the C by GE line. In addition to the standard bulbs announced in the fall, the company’s also releasing full color lights with millions of color options, available in a handful of configurations, including a lighting strip.”

TechCrunch: Internet providers could easily snoop on your smart home

TechCrunch: Internet providers could easily snoop on your smart home. “We’ve mostly moved past the point where our Internet of Things devices leak private information to anyone watching via unsecured connections, but that doesn’t mean you can stop being afraid. Never, ever stop being afraid. To top up your paranoia reserves, a new study finds that internet providers can, if they so choose, monitor all kinds of things from your smart home’s traitorous metadata.”