TechCrunch: Mobile phone companies appear to be providing your number and location to anyone who pays

TechCrunch: Mobile phone companies appear to be providing your number and location to anyone who pays. “You may remember that last year, Verizon (which owns Oath, which owns TechCrunch) was punished by the FCC for injecting information into its subscribers’ traffic that allowed them to be tracked without their consent. That practice appears to be alive and well despite being disallowed in a ruling last March: companies appear to be able to request your number, location, and other details from your mobile provider quite easily.”

Smartphone screen repair: seven DIY fixes (The Telegraph)

The Telegraph: Smartphone screen repair: seven DIY fixes . “Mobile phones are not as indestructible as the small-screened handsets of old. You could almost throw the Nokia 5210 on the floor and there would be little discernable damage to the phone’s screen. But with the advent of much larger, delicate screens on smartphones, cracking, scratching or breaking the screen altogether is much harder to avoid. Here we bring you seven DIY ways to fix your screen and avoid costly repairs.”

BetaNews: Free online service tests mobile app security and privacy

BetaNews: Free online service tests mobile app security and privacy. “When you download a mobile app you sometimes get more than you bargained for, Uber’s app that tracked iPhone users for example. It can be hard to know exactly what apps on your phone are up to. Now though, application security testing company High-Tech Bridge is launching a free ‘Mobile X-Ray’ service for developers that analyses native and hybrid iOS and Android apps and detects the most common weakness and vulnerabilities.”

Motherboard: T-Mobile Website Allowed Hackers to Access Your Account Data With Just Your Phone Number

Motherboard: T-Mobile Website Allowed Hackers to Access Your Account Data With Just Your Phone Number. “Until last week, a bug on a T-Mobile website let hackers access personal data such as email address, a customer’s T-Mobile account number, and the phone’s IMSI, a standardized unique number that identifies subscribers. On Friday, a day after Motherboard asked T-Mobile about the issue, the company fixed the bug.”

Lifehacker: What Parents Need to Know About New “Honesty” Apps Sarahah and TBH

Lifehacker: What Parents Need to Know About New “Honesty” Apps Sarahah and TBH. “We’re all curious about what others think of us. For teens, the yearning for validation is intense. Does anyone think I’m cool? Was the outfit I wore today too much? Am I fun to be around? Two new ‘honesty’ apps let them receive the peer feedback they crave, anonymously.”

Turn Off Bluetooth: BlueBorne ZeroDays Disclosed (Cylance)

Cylance: Turn Off Bluetooth: BlueBorne ZeroDays Disclosed. “Last month, I wrote about Broadpwn. Broadpwn is an exploit which can be used to take over many smartphones and tablets, iPhones and Android devices alike. It targets Broadcom Wifi chipsets, which are used in mobile devices from a variety of OEMs including Apple and Samsung. The bright side is that it’s simply a vulnerability that was found by a security researcher, and updating to the latest versions of iOS and Android patches the vulnerability. That’s not the case for this Bluetooth exploit, however. Armis Labs discovered eight zero day vulnerabilities. That’s right – BlueBorne is a collection of vulnerabilities, many with patches that are still being developed.”

The Spaces: Will the new ‘Shazam for art’ app change the gallery experience forever?

The Spaces: Will the new ‘Shazam for art’ app change the gallery experience forever?. “New app Smartify aims to be the ‘Shazam of the art world’, giving users instant information about thousands of artworks on show in public galleries across the world. The smartphone and tablet app uses image recognition technology to scan and identify artworks, earning comparison to the famous music app, founded in 1999. Smartify also provides audio interviews with artists, as well as hidden stories about the pieces and curatorial information, acting as a free hand-held tour guide for curious gallery-goers.” 30 institutions participating so far. Sounds awesome!