Phys .org: Different social media platforms foster different levels of segregation in online communities

Phys .org: Different social media platforms foster different levels of segregation in online communities. “A team of researchers from Ca’Foscari Univerity of Venice, the Institute for Scientific Interchange Foundation, the University of Brescia and the Sapienza University of Rome has found that different kinds of social media platforms foster different levels of segregation in online communities. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of millions of online posts on several leading social media sites and what they found.”

How to burst your bubble: broadening your social media horizons (UC Riverside News)

UC Riverside News: How to burst your bubble: broadening your social media horizons. “A computer scientist explains how our online behavior drives us into echo chambers. Evangelos Papalexakis is an assistant professor of computer science and engineering at UC Riverside’s Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering. His research spans data science, signal processing, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. One of his ongoing projects aims to develop an automated fake news detection mechanism for social media.”

The Atlantic: Sorry to Burst Your Quarantine Bubble

The Atlantic: Sorry to Burst Your Quarantine Bubble. “In theory, a bubble is meant to limit the spread of the coronavirus by trapping it in small groups of people and preventing it from jumping out. ‘The goal here with an infectious agent like SARS-CoV-2 is that you want to try and not give it hosts,’ Keri Althoff, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, told me. ‘That’s the name of the game.’ Earlier this year, researchers modeled the best ways to flatten the curve by limiting social interactions and found that having people interact with only the same few contacts over and over again was the most effective approach. But the details of how exactly to go about podding can be hard to pin down.”

Wired: How to Break Out of Your Social Media Echo Chamber

Wired: How to Break Out of Your Social Media Echo Chamber. “It’s a tale of two feeds, because thanks to confirmation bias and powerful proprietary algorithms, social media platforms ensure we only get a single side of every story. Even though most Americans continue to describe themselves as holding balanced views, we still naturally gravitate toward certain content online. Over time, algorithms turn slight preferences into a polarized environment in which only the loudest voices and most extreme opinions on either side can break through the noise.”

Illinois News Bureau: Journalists’ Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles

Illinois News Bureau: Journalists’ Twitter use shows them talking within smaller bubbles . “Journalists in Washington, D.C., have long been accused of living in a ‘Beltway bubble,’ isolated from the broader public, talking too much to each other. Their interactions on Twitter, however, show them congregating in even smaller ‘microbubbles,’ says a recent study. The journalists within each communicate more among themselves than with journalists outside the group.”

MIT Technology Review: Social bubbles may be the best way for societies to emerge from lockdown

MIT Technology Review: Social bubbles may be the best way for societies to emerge from lockdown. “Holing up with groups of friends or neighbors or other families during lockdown has given many people, especially those stuck home alone, a way to relieve isolation without spreading covid-19. These groups are known as bubbles, and new computer simulations described in Nature today show they may really work.”