Penn State News: New book highlights Colored Conventions and long history of Black activism

Penn State News: New book highlights Colored Conventions and long history of Black activism. “‘The Colored Conventions Movement: Black Organizing in the Nineteenth Century,’ published by the University of North Carolina Press and released in March, is the first to emerge from the award-winning Colored Conventions Project (CCP), an interdisciplinary research hub housed in Penn State’s Center for Black Digital Research (CBDR). The CCP uses digital tools to bring the scattered records of the movement to digital life and make them freely available. Its digital archive has more than quintupled the number of previously available minutes of more than 200 conventions by locating, transcribing, and archiving the records that document this little-known movement.”

SF State News: New study on #MeToo movement reveals Twitter echo chamber

SF State News: New study on #MeToo movement reveals Twitter echo chamber. “Two years ago, San Francisco State University Associate Professor of Economics Sepideh Modrek published a paper about the 2017 #MeToo movement. The viral hashtag emerged after celebrities started coming forward with sexual assault allegations against Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein and other well-known public figures. Modrek’s first paper was a snapshot of those early Twitter conversations of mostly women tweeting personal stories of sexual assault and voicing support for survivors. In a new paper published in the April 2021 Journal of Interpersonal Violence, Modrek returned to Twitter to examine how the movement affected those uninvolved in the initial online conversations. The answer, unfortunately: not much.”

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives

Washington Post: Corporations are working with social media influencers to cancel-proof their racial justice initiatives. “Advocating for racial allyship is not something corporate America has traditionally embraced. But the multiracial protests against police brutality last year prompted many companies to examine their role in combating systemic racism and pushing White Americans to reflect on their understanding of race and privilege — all while trying to increase market share. With every new well-meaning — or opportunistic, depending on the details — effort comes the potential for public and painful missteps.”

‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice (The Mercury)

The Mercury: ‘Can You Find the Gun?’: virtual art festival explores social justice. “The festival showcases 13 projects that include short films and documentaries, animated shorts, an interactive digital archive and a video game. The pieces engage with topics ranging from the Black Lives Matter movement and police brutality to domestic violence and the impacts of the pandemic on different communities. The festival culminated in a panel event on March 31, but the works remain viewable on the [Social Justice Art & Film Festival] website.”

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color

Maryland Today: UMD Libraries, Others Awarded $750K to Archive Social Justice Activism by College Students of Color. “The University of Maryland Libraries, the Atlanta University Center Robert Woodruff Library and the nationwide consortium Project STAND have received a $750,000 grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to expand a free digital archive of documents and artifacts chronicling activism among college students of color. The multi-institutional collection includes oral histories, recordings of student radio, film and digital photography, posters, newspapers and other documentation of diverse movements and groups, stretching from the present as far back as student abolitionist activity during African American enslavement.”

University of Maine: Online collection documents activism by women’s organizations in Maine

University of Maine: Online collection documents activism by women’s organizations in Maine. “The Maine Women’s History Collection documents the efforts of women’s organizations to address a variety of social and political issues including women’s suffrage, the Equal Rights Amendment, child care, health care, environmental pollution, reproductive rights, LGBTQ rights and social stratification, and provides evidence of persistent obstacles to gender equality, such as gender stereotypes, employment discrimination and domestic violence.”

COVID-21: A Primer (Route Fifty)

Route Fifty: COVID-21: A Primer. “The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic may drag on for years, but the nightmare of last year—of an entirely new viral illness, emerging in a specific sociopolitical context—is behind us. Instead we’re facing a new set of challenges, and they are not easily comparable to what has come before. It’s worth considering a new way of thinking about the period of the pandemic now ahead of us—one that leads us neither to complacency nor to paralyzing despair. In many ways COVID-19 is already over. What lies ahead is COVID-21.”

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries

National Library of Scotland: New digital resource on African American revolutionaries . “Struggles for Liberty takes its name from the phrase ‘struggles in the cause of liberty’, written by Lewis Henry Douglass (eldest son of Frederick Douglass) of his mother, Anna Murray Douglass’s tireless, heroic antislavery and social justice activism. The resource is structured by theme: the ‘Story of the Slave’; the History of Black Abolition; the US Civil War; African American activists in Scotland; and the Anna Murray and Frederick Douglass Family. It also includes interactive maps and downloadable learning activities for teachers, including activities mapped to the Curriculum for Excellence.”

Lovin’ Malta: Got Photos From Malta’s 2019 Protests? This Project Needs Your Help To Preserve History

Lovin’ Malta: Got Photos From Malta’s 2019 Protests? This Project Needs Your Help To Preserve History. “A publication and online archive aimed at preserving iconic moments that capture protestors’ fury during the 2019 political reckoning in Malta is being curated – and the organisers need your help to make it come to life. ‘Our Island III’ is an incredible art project organised by aditus with the support and sponsorship of the Malta Arts Council Creative Communities, the Embassy of France in Malta and the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Malta.”

Harvard Law Today: How ‘digital witnesses’ are documenting history and challenging the status quo

Harvard Law Today: How ‘digital witnesses’ are documenting history and challenging the status quo. “In May 2020, George Floyd’s murder by law enforcement was captured on video by a 17-year-old girl. The agonizing, near nine-minute recording spread like wildfire on the internet, inciting rage, protests, and marked a pivotal moment in the Black Lives Matter movement. This video illustrates how young Black people around the United States — but also in other countries — are documenting and sharing their lives and major events using commonly available tools like cellphones. A recent event hosted by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society explored how such young ‘digital witnesses’ are documenting — and making — history in the United States and around the world.”

Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia (Channel News Asia)

Channel News Asia: Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia. “It might be easy to dismiss the Milk Tea Alliance as a Gen-Z Internet joke. But the meme is successful in tapping into something deeper in the collective consciousness of a region that is famously diverse and defiant of collective action. It taps into discontent with the regional decline of democracy and fears about the rise of China as a hegemonic power. There is a bigger picture beyond the protests in Myanmar. The country fits a broader pattern of recent years in which disparate protests in Southeast Asia, triggered by different events, exhibit undercurrents of anxiety about the growing influence of China.”

Social media drove real police reform in America: Study (KCBS)

KCBS: Social media drove real police reform in America: Study. “Last year’s widespread social media conversations concerning racial and social justice in America spilled over into actual police reform, a new study says. The report, titled ‘Say Their Names,’ was released by communications and research firm Marathon Strategies and The BLK+Cross. It found a direct correlation between state-level legislature action on social justice issues and the amplified online dialogue about police reform, using analysis and trends from all 50 states and Washington, D.C.”

PR Newswire: Dictionary. com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Dictionary.com Announces New Words Relating to Covid, Social Justice, and More (PRESS RELEASE). “Dictionary.com today announced its latest addition of new words, which reflects the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on language and hits on a variety of additional themes relating to race, social justice, identity, and culture. The leading online dictionary has updated 7,600 entries, including 450 new entries and 94 new definitions in existing entries.”