Voice of America: Even After Death, Social Media Still Connects Loved Ones

Voice of America: Even After Death, Social Media Still Connects Loved Ones. “Social media is turning into a vast graveyard for profiles of owners who have passed away, leaving them unattended or as standing memorials. And some experts are urging social networks to do more to help users prepare for their digital deaths. There are millions of them – pages that remain on social media sites, and in some cases, automatically update after their owners’ death. The numbers vary from 5 million to as many as 300 million, according to Jed Brubaker, a digital death expert with the University of Colorado, Boulder. But it’s hard to know the exact numbers because ‘tracking the rate of death across the world is hard,’ he said.”

New Scientist: Sock puppet accounts unmasked by the way they write and post

New Scientist: Sock puppet accounts unmasked by the way they write and post. “‘Sock puppets’ are the scourge of online discussion . Multiple accounts controlled by the same user can dominate comment forums and spread fake news. But now there’s a way to unmask the puppeteers. A study of nine websites that use comment service Disqus to let readers post responses to articles found that sock puppets can be identified based on their writing style, posting activity and relationship with other users.”

The Conversation: How Facebook – the Wal-Mart of the internet – dismantled online subcultures

The Conversation: How Facebook – the Wal-Mart of the internet – dismantled online subcultures. “For those who value feeling as if going online is a physical meeting point, easy and fleeting connectivity can be perceived as a bad thing, trading convenience for commitment. BME’s community was built up through sustained and regular participation. It’s the difference between grabbing a Dunkin Donuts coffee on the way to work and being a regular at a neighborhood bar. Becoming part of a community involves hanging out, messing around and committing to local rules for participation.”

NN/LM Training Office: 2 Backchannel Discussion Tools for Librarians

NN/LM Training Office: 2 Backchannel Discussion Tools for Librarians. “Backchannels have been around for awhile. A 2010 Educause 7 Things You Should Know About Backchannel Communication called them ‘a secondary electronic conversation that takes place at the same time as a conference session, lecture, or instructor-led learning activity.’ Backchannels provide a space for real time conversation, alongside the primary activity. Twitter is an example of a backchannel. Here’s two more backchannel tools you might find useful.” Short article, but a neglected resource.

Nieman Lab: People who think about this stuff don’t think bad online behavior will get better any time soon

Nieman Lab: People who think about this stuff don’t think bad online behavior will get better any time soon. “The quality of public discourse online is not going to get better and may actually get worse over the next decade, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Pew Research Center that invited 8,000 technology experts, scholars, corporate practitioners and government leaders[”] to respond.”

Stanford: Stanford research shows that anyone can become an Internet troll

Stanford: Stanford research shows that anyone can become an Internet troll. “The common assumption is that people who troll are different from the rest of us, allowing us to dismiss them and their behavior. But research from Stanford University and Cornell University, published as part of the upcoming 2017 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW 2017), suggests otherwise. The research offers evidence that, under the right circumstances, anyone can become a troll.”

Global Voices: China Starts Arresting Internet Users for Insulting the Police

Global Voices: China Starts Arresting Internet Users for Insulting the Police . “In recent weeks, police in China have been arresting Internet users who share messages that insult law enforcement officials. According the Radio Free Asia, at least six people have already been detained. Two of these individuals were reportedly arrested on Jan. 28, for mocking a police officer killed the night before in the line of duty.”

Phys.org : Millions of tweets analyzed to measure perceived trustworthiness

Phys.org: Millions of tweets analyzed to measure perceived trustworthiness. “By scanning 66 million tweets linked to nearly 1,400 real-world events, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have built a language model that identifies words and phrases that lead to strong or weak perceived levels of credibility on Twitter. Their findings suggest that the words of millions of people on social media have considerable information about an event’s credibility – even when an event is still ongoing.”

CNET: Governments suck at social media, but you deserve some blame

CNET: Governments suck at social media, but you deserve some blame . No, I don’t. “The Leaders’ Report, published by advertising and consulting firm WPP, looked at how government agencies across 40 countries reach out to citizens. WPP spoke with communications leaders from 20 governments, along with five leaders of multilateral organizations. The report’s conclusion: the majority of countries have been failing on social media.”

Business Insider: Online communities don’t have to be hate-filled cesspools — and this guy proved it

Business Insider: Online communities don’t have to be hate-filled cesspools — and this guy proved it. “Joel Spolsky was blogging before it was called ‘blogging.’ Back in 2000, Spolsky was the founding CEO of Fog Creek Software, a startup that got its beginning building tools for software developers. He began writing his thoughts about running a company, working for and competing against Microsoft (he was on the Excel team back in the 1990s), and other topics of interest to the programming community, in a space called ‘Joel on Software.’” Terrific blog, and a highlight of my RSS feed list when it was a lot skinnier than it is now.

WSJ: How to Tweet if You’re in Government and Not Donald Trump: Write, Review, Edit, Seek Approval, Wait, Edit, (Maybe) Send

Wall Street Journal (and not paywalled as far as I can tell): How to Tweet if You’re in Government and Not Donald Trump: Write, Review, Edit, Seek Approval, Wait, Edit, (Maybe) Send. “In 2010, a top Justice Department official told the agency’s divisions they could set up Twitter accounts and he convened a ‘working group’ to provide guidance on what, when and how the agency could tweet. They’re still working on it.”

Twitch Offers New Options for Moderating Chat

Twitch is launching a new tool for moderating chat on its platform (PRESS RELEASE). “AutoMod is a unique moderation tool that does more than filter inappropriate chat. When a user sends a message that AutoMod flags as potentially inappropriate, the message is held in a publishing queue awaiting moderator approval. AutoMod also enables broadcasters to adjust the degree of filtering in the event they are more or less conservative about the type of dialogue they want to see in their chat. Beyond identifying inappropriate words and phrases, AutoMod can detect potentially inappropriate strings of emotes and other characters or symbols that others could use to evade filtering.”

NPR: Post-Election, Overwhelmed Facebook Users Unfriend, Cut Back

NPR: Post-Election, Overwhelmed Facebook Users Unfriend, Cut Back. “Facebook is a source of news for a majority of American adults, but in the vitriol and propaganda of the 2016 election, its proverbial public square for many users has devolved into a never-ending Thanksgiving-dinner debate — or an omnipresent Speakers’ Corner. As [Michael] Lowder says his father put it, opining on social media is the equivalent of shouting off a soapbox in the street: a declaration, rather than discussion.”

Phys.org: New research looks at fallout from posting embarrassing moments on social media

Phys.org: New research looks at fallout from posting embarrassing moments on social media . ” Sung Kim, professor of operations and information management at the Wisconsin School of Business at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, along with Ben Choi of the UNSW Australia Business School, Zhenhui Jiang of the National University of Singapore, and Bo Xiao of the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, looked at the consequences of online invasions of privacy and their effects on relationships. The researchers examined two key variables around embarrassing social media posts—whether or not the target of the post was tagged (exposing the content to both the poster’s network and the target’s friends) and the level of shared friends in their networks.”