New York Times: What Happens When You Get Famous Off One Song?

New York Times: What Happens When You Get Famous Off One Song?. “Last summer, a teenager named Tom Austin decided on a whim to record a rap song. He’d never made music before. But even as he was writing down lyrics — picking out references from an iPhone note of random stuff he’d been keeping — he was strangely sure of himself.”

Ars Technica: 30,000 followers makes you an Internet “celebrity,” says UK ad regulator

Ars Technica: 30,000 followers makes you an Internet “celebrity,” says UK ad regulator. “One of the stranger questions of our modern era: when does being “Internet famous” translate into being, well, actually famous? According to a UK regulator, the magic number is 30,000 followers.”

Slate: Beware the Cuteness Economy

Slate: Beware the Cuteness Economy. “In the recent BuzzFeed piece about Instagram-famous preschooler Mila Stauffer, Mila’s mother Katie defends her full-time job positioning her kid as a social media star against critics who wonder whether Mila has to spend too much of her time making videos. But none of the reasonable critiques aired in that piece quite define my own uneasiness. Even if Mila herself is happy as a clam, the selling of cute kids online is bad news for our relationships with real children.”

The Atlantic: All Followers Are Fake Followers

The Atlantic: All Followers Are Fake Followers. “For people whose work product is intimately connected to their person, appearing influential online has become more important, too. Bennett Foddy and I were excited about our relative Twitter fame partly because of narcissism, and partly because it promised an improved platform for us as creators. When I go to write a book proposal, for example, having 100,000 Twitter followers offers evidence to the publishers who might buy my book. In an ideal world, it would mean that I have a platform from which to promote that book to a throng of eager buyers. But in the short-term, it mostly helps me appear to have such a platform in order to get the deal done.”