Awario: 7 best Google Alerts alternatives

Yes, this article is from Awario, and the first tool suggested IS Awario, but the writeups for the rest of the resources are decent. So, from Awario: 7 best Google Alerts alternatives. “For the past… many years, mentions on social media have been getting a lot of attention. Communication between people and brands happens on social media all the time, and social media users often discuss brands without tagging the said brands. Of course, if you care about what the Internet says about you, ignoring social media is just not an option. So now we arrived at the most obvious conclusion the world has ever seen. If you care about your online presence, you need a Google Alert alternative. This is a list of such tools.” Let me add though while Google Alerts can be tedious and annoying, the last thing they are is useless.

Not just listening: Podcast monitoring tools find their place in the dashboard (PR Week)

PR Week: Not just listening: Podcast monitoring tools find their place in the dashboard. “Nearly 90 million Americans are listening to podcasts each week, according to Edison Research. And while the media type has been on the scene for more than a decade, monitoring capabilities have appeared much more recently amid growing demand.”

Popular Science: How to read the news without doom scrolling through social media

Popular Science: How to read the news without doom scrolling through social media. “Social media has plenty of uses—it allows us to stay in touch with our loved ones in spite of social distancing and keeps us informed of what’s going on out there in the world. But even in the best of times, these platforms can be a hell-pit, where relatives rant about the latest political activity and anonymous trolls and bots turn every headline into a hill to die on. It can seem hard to take time away from Facebook, Twitter, and Reddit if you want to stay on top of the latest news, but it doesn’t have to be. There are other ways to stay up to date on current events without relying on the hive mind. And you won’t be less-informed by using them.”

CBS Sacramento: UC Davis Researchers Conducting Coronavirus Study Suggest Social Media Tracking To Help Forecast Outbreaks

CBS Sacramento: UC Davis Researchers Conducting Coronavirus Study Suggest Social Media Tracking To Help Forecast Outbreaks. “UC Davis researchers conducting a study of coronavirus-related posts on China’s popular microblogging website Weibo say social media surveillance could help health officials identify and respond to emerging outbreaks. The study involved the analysis of over 12 million Weibo posts regarding COVID-19 between November 2019 and March 2020. The research found that posts about symptoms and the disease could help health officials predict daily case counts up to week earlier than officials statistics.”

CSRWire: COVID-19 Social Media Data Shared in Talkwalker Report (PRESS RELEASE)

CSRWire: COVID-19 Social Media Data Shared in Talkwalker Report (PRESS RELEASE). “Talkwalker, the social listening and analytics company, announces a COVID-19 resource that shares global social media data and insights around the pandemic. The freely available report can be found on the Talkwalker website and will be updated daily to include the most recent information.”

Coronavirus alerts: How to get news updates on your phone right now (CNET)

CNET: Coronavirus alerts: How to get news updates on your phone right now. “You can use sources such as Twitter, Google Alerts and your favorite news sites to receive updates and notifications about where the coronavirus is and what you can do to help keep yourself and your community safe. You can also sign up for text alerts to receive information about how many cases are in your area and what’s closing down, like schools and churches. Read on to learn how to set up for alerts about coronavirus developments.” Basics for most of y’all but might be useful for less tech-savvy people.

‘Naked intimidation’: how universities silence academics on social media (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Naked intimidation’: how universities silence academics on social media. “Universities increasingly recognise the value in academics having a social media presence – it helps recruit students, disseminate research and increase brand awareness. They also, generally, recognise that you don’t achieve this by tightly controlling what academics say – they need to find their own voice. ‘But when that individual voice is in conflict with the official brand it creates a tension,’ says Martin Weller, professor of educational technology at the Open University.”

AraNet: New Deep Learning Toolkit for Arabic Social Media (Synced)

Synced: AraNet: New Deep Learning Toolkit for Arabic Social Media. “The performance of natural language processing (NLP) systems has dramatically improved on tasks such as reading comprehension and natural language inference, and with these advances have come many new application scenarios for the tech. Unsurprisingly, English is where most NLP R&D has been focused. Now, a team of researchers from the Natural Language Processing Lab at the University of British Columbia in Canada have proposed AraNet, a deep learning toolkit designed for Arabic social media processing.”

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?

The Scientist: Can Social Media Inform Public Health Efforts?. “On March 14, 2014, HealthMap—an online database created by researchers at Boston’s Children’s Hospital in 2006 to collect accounts of disease cases from various online sources—notified scientists of an article written in French about cases of a ‘strange fever’ in Macenta, Guinea. Nine days later, the World Health Organization officially announced an Ebola outbreak in the area.”

Reuters: French court clears social media tracking plan in tax crackdown

Reuters: French court clears social media tracking plan in tax crackdown. “France’s government can pursue plans to trawl social media to detect tax avoidance, its Constitutional Court ruled on Friday, although it introduced limitations on what information can be collected following a privacy outcry.” French government officials have already used Google Maps to catch swimming pool tax cheaters. Why is anybody surprised?

Military .com: Pentagon Announces Plans to Monitor Foreign Trainees’ Social Media Posts

Military .com: Pentagon Announces Plans to Monitor Foreign Trainees’ Social Media Posts. “The Pentagon has completed re-screening all Saudi students in U.S. military training programs following a deadly Dec. 6 shooting rampage at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Defense Department officials announced Thursday. No indications of additional threats have surfaced, they said. Moving forward, DoD plans to increase vetting practices for Saudi Arabian and other foreign nationals in training at military bases in the U.S., including checks of their social media posts.”

The American Genius: Hear me out – Google Alerts but for Facebook Groups

The American Genius: Hear me out – Google Alerts but for Facebook Groups. “You pick a group and a keyword, as well as the frequency of your email updates. Options shown in the demo video include daily and hourly. Once you’ve set up the account, the company takes 1-3 days to set you up on the back end, and then you’re good to go. At the current pricing, a $99/month account lets you track 10 keywords across 5 different groups.”

Ubergizmo: Twitter Now Lets Users Follow Their Favorite Topics

Ubergizmo: Twitter Now Lets Users Follow Their Favorite Topics. “Twitter lets you follow users where you can get updates based on their tweets. However, not everyone posts things that you might be interested in, in which it would then be easier to try and sort news and topics through hashtags. However, the good news is that Twitter will be making some changes on that front.”

GW Hatchet: Thousands use GW Libraries’ social media archive tool six years after debut

GW Hatchet: Thousands use GW Libraries’ social media archive tool six years after debut. “More than 3,000 users have taken advantage of a tool GW Libraries officials created to help researchers archive and analyze social media posts over the past six years. Developed in 2013 by a group of software developers, archivists and librarians, the Social Feed Manager collects data from Twitter, Tumblr, Flickr and Sina Weibo – a Chinese blogging website – and exports and organizes the data for researcher use.”

Federal News Network: Census Bureau stands up ‘fusion center’ to combat misinformation during 2020 count

Federal News Network: Census Bureau stands up ‘fusion center’ to combat misinformation during 2020 count. “The Census Bureau has stood up a ‘fusion center’ to monitor social media for misinformation during the 2020 count and has doubled down on its resilience planning in the final months of preparation.”