New York Times: After Buffalo Shooting Video Spreads, Social Platforms Face Questions

New York Times: After Buffalo Shooting Video Spreads, Social Platforms Face Questions. “Mass shootings — and live broadcasts — raise questions about the role and responsibility of social media sites in allowing violent and hateful content to proliferate. Many of the gunmen in the shootings have written that they developed their racist and antisemitic beliefs trawling online forums like Reddit and 4chan, and were spurred on by watching other shooters stream their attacks live.”

Irish Times: Sinn Féin’s targeting of voters through social media has paid off

Irish Times: Sinn Féin’s targeting of voters through social media has paid off. “In a campaign dubbed safe and lacklustre by many commentators, Sinn Féin’s targeting of younger and disconnected voters through videos on platforms such as TikTok – where it has 80,000 followers alone – Instagram and Facebook has been linked in part to its historic win.”

JD Supra: UK Considers How to Tackle Trend of Social Media Influencers Promoting Counterfeit Products

JD Supra: UK Considers How to Tackle Trend of Social Media Influencers Promoting Counterfeit Products. “The United Kingdom’s intellectual property laws provide to rights owners important protections, which encourage creativity and drives the free market economy. However, changing attitudes around counterfeits, the growth of the digital economy, and the continued influence of social media have culminated in ever-increasing violations of such rights, potentially resulting in direct harm to the market, stalled development, and the undermining of public welfare. More recently, influencers have come under scrutiny for facilitating trade in counterfeit products.”

Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others (CNN)

CNN: Dissection by TikTok: Johnny Depp, Amber Heard trial posts are making accidental influencers out of some, targets out of others. “Sophie Doggett, whose TikTok was previously populated by videos on everyday things such as herself or her pets, posted to her TikTok account on April 25 a clip of Heard’s lawyer asking a question of a witness and then immediately objecting to the response. It is one of many moments in the trial that has been seized upon by people like Doggett, as clips of testimony and references to the case have pervaded TikTok in a way that no trial has before…. Doggett, who paired the clip to playful music, said she gained 30,000 followers seemingly overnight from the post which has, to date, been viewed more than 5 million times.”

BuzzFeed News: BYU’s “Black Menaces” Are Quizzing Fellow Students About Their Problematic Opinions

BuzzFeed News: BYU’s “Black Menaces” Are Quizzing Fellow Students About Their Problematic Opinions. “A group of TikTok creators at Brigham Young University, a predominantly Mormon college, call themselves the Black Menaces — even if those watching simply see them as doing god’s work. In one of their first videos, Rachel Weaver, who is Black, asks a white BYU student if he believes that God approved the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints banning Black people from joining the priesthood until 1978.”

Marine Corps Times: New social media, electronics policies likely on the way for Marines

Marine Corps Times: New social media, electronics policies likely on the way for Marines. “The Marine Corps is about to release a document codifying ‘information’ as a war-fighting function ― and that’s likely to have direct implications for how Marines are told to conduct themselves online. As Russia and Ukraine wage a conflict in which misinformation and disinformation play a central role, top-echelon Marine leaders want troops and commanders to be clear on how information affects every part of war-fighting and decision-making.”

Washington Post: How Twitter lost the celebs

Washington Post: How Twitter lost the celebs. “Interviews with 17 people who represent, consult and tweet for celebrities show that Twitter is viewed as a high-risk, low-reward platform for many A-list entertainers. It’s a place where the discourse has become so politicized that many prefer not to engage personally at all, delegating tweeting duties to underlings or outside agents who post anodyne promotional messages. They have also been turned off by harassment or abuse.”

Techdirt: The Internet Has Opened Up The Creator Economy To New Heights

Techdirt: The Internet Has Opened Up The Creator Economy To New Heights. “Until recently, writers, musicians, artists and filmmakers collectively formed a relatively select group that was hard to enter as a professional. Today, anyone with an Internet connection can spread the word about their work and make money from it. In effect, everyone who is online, to a greater or lesser degree, is a digital creator – even with the most ephemeral of posts on social media.”

The Verge: Twitter CEO pushes out top execs, freezes hiring

The Verge: Twitter CEO pushes out top execs, freezes hiring. “Twitter is shaking up its top leadership. The first move came as consumer product leader Kayvon Beykpour announced on Twitter that current CEO Parag Agrawal ‘asked me to leave after letting me know that he wants to take the team in a different direction.’ Bruce Falck, the general manager of revenue and head of product for its business side, confirmed in a (now deleted) tweet that he was also fired by Agrawal.”

Say ‘no’ to coyotes: DHS turns to social media to keep migrants from coming to U.S. (Border Report)

Border Report: Say ‘no’ to coyotes: DHS turns to social media to keep migrants from coming to U.S.. “The U.S. government is using social media to deter people in Honduras and Guatemala from giving in to smugglers who promise them easy access to the United States. This week, U.S. Customs and Border Protection began distributing digital ads in platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp.”

Mashable: New online campaign reminds us that street harassment isn’t a rite of passage. It’s a public health concern.

Mashable: New online campaign reminds us that street harassment isn’t a rite of passage. It’s a public health concern.. “[Candice] Cho’s story is just one representation of a diverse array of tales shared through the #SaferPlace social media campaign, a new effort by advocates to document the frequent harassment that women, people of color, and LGBT and gender nonconforming people face in public spaces. As May is Asian and Pacific Islander (API) Heritage Month, the social media effort adds a sense of heightened, nuanced awareness of the intersectional public safety issues faced by members of these diverse communities.”