Study: Information literacy can combat ‘fake news’ (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Study: Information literacy can combat ‘fake news’. “A new study conducted by Ohio University professor Dr. M. Laeeq Khan found that several factors can be used to predict someone’s ability to detect misinformation, otherwise known as ‘fake news,’ on social media. Additionally, the study found that, by looking at certain factors, it is also possible to predict if someone is likely to share misinformation based on the same factors.”

Engadget: Trump administration may monitor social media to catch disability fraud (updated)

Engadget: Trump administration may monitor social media to catch disability fraud (updated). “If you’re claiming disability benefits, a latergram of you hiking or going out dancing could soon get you in trouble. A proposed Trump administration rule would allow agency officials to snoop on the social media accounts of Social Security disability recipients. The White House is working with the Social Security Administration to propose a new rule that allow for social media monitoring in order to crack down on fraud, reports the New York Times.”

New York Times: Top Universities Join to Push ‘Public Interest Technology’

New York Times: Top Universities Join to Push ‘Public Interest Technology’. “As technology becomes increasingly pervasive in American life, universities across the United States have been devising ways to teach students how to grapple with the consequences on society. Now, 21 leading universities are banding together to promote their various programs. On Monday, the schools announced that they had formed a new organization called the Public Interest Technology University Network.”

New York Times: How TikTok Is Rewriting the World

New York Times: How TikTok Is Rewriting the World. “Hello, person who is, statistically speaking, a human adult aged approximately ‘millennial’ to ‘boomer.’ The analytics suggest a high likelihood that you’re aware there is an app named TikTok, and a similarly high likelihood that you’re not totally sure what it’s all about. Maybe you asked someone younger in your life, and they tried to explain and possibly failed. Or maybe you’ve heard that this new, extraordinarily popular video app is ‘a refreshing outlier in the social media universe’ that’s ‘genuinely fun to use.’ Maybe you even tried it, but bounced straight out, confused and sapped.”

Recode: Inside Twitter’s ambitious plan to change the way we tweet

Recode: Inside Twitter’s ambitious plan to change the way we tweet. “Everything the company seems to do — from cracking down on bots to building new conversation features — has been done in the name of a healthier Twitter. When the company’s user base started shrinking noticeably last year, Twitter said that its focus on health was at least partly to blame. Measuring the health of interactions is just one part of that broader effort, but it’s one of the more challenging and confusing parts. Removing bots and spam are technical problems. Truly understanding the health of a conversation requires things like understanding who is talking, what they’re talking about, or when someone is using sarcasm. Not all arguments, of course, are bad.”

Pew: Use of smartphones and social media is common across most emerging economies

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Use of smartphones and social media is common across most emerging economies. “Large majorities in the 11 emerging and developing countries surveyed either own or share a mobile phone, and in every country it is much more common to own one’s own phone than to share it with someone else. In seven of these countries, half or more now use smartphones – and smartphone use is especially common among younger and more educated groups.”