New York Times Magazine: How Secrecy Fuels Facebook Paranoia

New York Times Magazine: How Secrecy Fuels Facebook Paranoia. “The biggest internet platforms are businesses built on asymmetric information. They know far more about their advertising, labor and commerce marketplaces than do any of the parties participating in them. We can guess, but can’t know, why we were shown a friend’s Facebook post about a divorce, instead of another’s about a child’s birth. We can theorize, but won’t be told, why YouTube thinks we want to see a right-wing polemic about Islam in Europe after watching a video about travel destinations in France. Everything that takes place within the platform kingdoms is enabled by systems we’re told must be kept private in order to function. We’re living in worlds governed by trade secrets. No wonder they’re making us all paranoid.”

The Jerusalem Post: Foreign Ministry Launches App To Stop Fake News On Social Media

The Jerusalem Post: Foreign Ministry Launches App To Stop Fake News On Social Media. “The Foreign Ministry and tech company Commun.it launched a program to share information about social media accounts spreading disinformation, the ministry announced on Wednesday. The initiative comes after months of efforts by the ministry to combat the phenomenon, which has spiked since early elections were announced. Journalists were targeted in five attempts by foreign Twitter accounts to spread fake news stories in the Israeli media. “

Search Engine Journal: 10 Social Media Trends That Will Matter Most in 2019

Search Engine Journal: 10 Social Media Trends That Will Matter Most in 2019 . “Like most digital marketing channels, social media is always evolving. People’s behaviors are changing, as are the technologies and capabilities of social media platforms. So what will be the key social media trends you need to know in 2019?” Honestly I’m not sure how much of this I agree with. I do think the list here is worth ruminating over, however.

CNN: Indian soldiers being ‘honey trapped’ by fake social media accounts from Pakistan

CNN: Indian soldiers being ‘honey trapped’ by fake social media accounts from Pakistan. “An Indian soldier has been ‘honey trapped’ into giving sensitive information to a fake Pakistani Facebook account, highlighting the widespread ‘catfishing’ problem facing India’s military. Sombir Singh, 22, was stationed near the India-Pakistan border when he struck up an intimate online relationship with an account he believed to be operated by an Indian army medical officer.”

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Do social media bots have a right to free speech?

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists: Do social media bots have a right to free speech?. “While the Kremlin agents who interfered in the US election likely wouldn’t be beholden to a state-level law in the United States, or deterred by it, domestic political campaigns and businesses might. For at least one constitutional scholar, that possibility raises this question: Do bots, like citizens, have that most sacred right enshrined in the First Amendment to the US Constitution, the right to free speech? Laurent Sacharoff, a law professor at the University of Arkansas, thinks the people programming bots may want US courts to answer that in the affirmative.”

WHIO: Convicted of buying sex? Dayton will tell your neighbors via Facebook.

WHIO: Convicted of buying sex? Dayton will tell your neighbors via Facebook.. “If you are convicted of buying sex from a prostitute in the city of Dayton, city officials are going to do their best to make sure your neighbors know about it … in 21st century style. The city of Dayton will begin buying specially targeted Facebook advertisements linked to the addresses of men who buy sex. The ads will tell people that one of their neighbors has been convicted and will give them a link to a web site listing the men’s names, addresses and crimes.”

Reuters: Social media giants plan push-back on India’s new regulations – sources

Reuters: Social media giants plan push-back on India’s new regulations – sources. “Global social media and technology giants are gearing up to fight sweeping new rules proposed by the Indian government that would require them to actively regulate content in one of the world’s biggest Internet markets, sources close to the matter told Reuters.”