Canada NewsWire: Government of Canada invests in over 800 projects to advance social sciences and humanities research (PRESS RELEASE)

Canada NewsWire: Government of Canada invests in over 800 projects to advance social sciences and humanities research (PRESS RELEASE). “Projects will explore a range of topics, including inclusive policing, the transition to a sustainable economy, First Nations self-determination, and achieving Canada’s net-zero emissions target. Other funded projects will examine motor skill intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder, domestic violence prevention, and partnerships to prevent and end homelessness.”

VOX EU: The promise of automated historical data linkage

VOX EU: The promise of automated historical data linkage. “A number of vital questions in the social sciences, relating to intergenerational mobility or assimilation of migrants for example, require data that follow individuals over time. The recent digitisation of historical population censuses for the US and other countries has increased their availability, but linking such historical data is challenging. This column compares the performance of various linking methods and concludes that automated methods perform no worse on key dimensions than (more expensive) hand linking using standard linking variables.”

No laboratory needed: The Person Project mines social science data with secure online activities (Princeton University)

Princeton University: No laboratory needed: The Person Project mines social science data with secure online activities . “Understanding the human psyche is complex, for ordinary people and scientists alike. Now, researchers at Princeton University have created a new tool for social scientists to study human psychology through a series of fun, thought-provoking activities. Launched this month, the Person Project website and smartphone app (available for both iPhone and Android) are designed to encrypt and store securely collected data from users who participate in these activities, providing an online platform for researchers to use in academic studies.”

Intellectual humility: the importance of knowing you might be wrong (Vox)

Vox: Intellectual humility: the importance of knowing you might be wrong. “Julia Rohrer wants to create a radical new culture for social scientists. A personality psychologist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Rohrer is trying to get her peers to publicly, willingly admit it when they are wrong. To do this, she, along with some colleagues, started up something called the Loss of Confidence Project. It’s designed to be an academic safe space for researchers to declare for all to see that they no longer believe in the accuracy of one of their previous findings. “

Scientific Data: An open database of productivity in Vietnam’s social sciences and humanities for public use

Scientific Data: An open database of productivity in Vietnam’s social sciences and humanities for public use. “This study presents a description of an open database on scientific output of Vietnamese researchers in social sciences and humanities, one that corrects for the shortcomings in current research publication databases such as data duplication, slow update, and a substantial cost of doing science. Here, using scientists’ self-reports, open online sources and cross-checking with Scopus database, we introduce a manual system and its semi-automated version of the database on the profiles of 657 Vietnamese researchers in social sciences and humanities who have published in Scopus-indexed journals from 2008 to 2018.”

The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research

The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research. “The identification of proper names of people, organizations, and locations from raw texts, referred to as Named Entity Recognition (NER), can be highly accurate when researchers use NER tools on a large collection of text with proper syntax. However, using existing NER tools for analyzing social media text can lead to poor identification of named entities. In particular, Twitter text frequently includes inconsistent capitalization, spelling errors, and shortened versions of words. TwitterNER, an open-source tool developed by doctoral student Shubhanshu Mishra, who is supervised by Assistant Professor Jana Diesner, can help researchers interested in performing NER on social media text.”

London School of Economics and Political Science: Announcing LSE Press – a new open access publishing platform for the social sciences

London School of Economics and Political Science: Announcing LSE Press – a new open access publishing platform for the social sciences. “Today marks the official launch of LSE Press, the School’s new open access publishing platform. LSE Press will provide a platform for high-quality research in the social sciences, and – in line with LSE’s aim to lead in international, interdisciplinary, issue-oriented social science – will support the launch and development of academic-led publications that are innovative in their format, content, and reach. The Press platform is provided in partnership with Ubiquity Press.”

University of North Carolina: Libraries Partner on Open-Access Publication Series

University of North Carolina: Libraries Partner on Open-Access Publication Series. “The University of North Carolina Press, the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the University Libraries published the first title in their collaborative open-access series, Studies in Latin America. Tropical Tongues: Language Ideologies, Endangerment, and Minority Languages in Belize by Jennifer Carolina Gómez Menjívar and William Noel Salmon is expected to be followed up by another monograph published this year. The new series will increase the availability of scholarly literature focused on the social sciences in Latin America and the Caribbean. As an open-access series, the books will be made available digitally to a wide audience, particularly for use in classroom settings.”

UCLA: Tapping Twitter to Understand Crowd Behavior and Protest

UCLA: Tapping Twitter to Understand Crowd Behavior and Protests. “[Zachary] Steinert-Threlkeld created a guide for acquiring and working with data sets culled from Twitter, which has more than 320 million global accounts generating more than half a billion messages every day. His efforts culminated this year with the publication of ‘Twitter as Data,’ the first guide in Cambridge University Press’ new Elements series on Quantitative and Computational Methods for Social Science. The series provides short introductions and hands-on tutorials to new and innovative research methodologies that may not yet appear in textbooks.” The book is free online “for a limited time”.

Phys .org: Big data hype hasn’t led to tan­gi­ble re­sults in the so­cial sci­ences, expert says

Phys.org: Big data hype hasn’t led to tan­gi­ble re­sults in the so­cial sci­ences, expert says . “Despite the great progress in basic research, such as speech recognition and image processing, success stories of existing big data applications in the social sciences are scarce. As early as 2014, big data plummeted from the “Peak of Inflated Expectations” to the “Trough of Disillusionment” phase in the Gartner Hype Cycle. In the basic sciences, the focus is on the technical prerequisites for efficiently recording and storing large quantities of data and automatically processing them. Artificial intelligence methods such as machine learning have great potential here. Only the social sciences have so far benefited little from this, and even seem to be losing ground to other disciplines. I notice that instead of drawing benefit from the flood of data for their empirical research, social scientists are often overwhelmed by the opportunities that arise.”

Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7) (Library of Congress)

Library of Congress: Digital Scholarship Resource Guide: Tools for Spatial Analysis (part 5 of 7). “In what has been often termed the ‘spatial turn,’ quantitative humanities and social sciences have come to emphasize place and space in their analyses. The mass amounts of geographical and temporal data available has lent itself to new ways of imagining and visualizing global networks. Increasingly sophisticated maps and timelines are increasingly simple to make and use. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is the field of techniques and scholarship that combines tabular data with geographical features to query, map, and visualize information. GIS technologies developed in the natural sciences to track things like weather, traffic, and disease patterns, but have moved into the humanities, enabling the spatial mapping of literature and history.”

Introducing: ImaginePhD! A career exploration tool for humanities & social science grad students (Notre Dame)

Notre Dame: Introducing: ImaginePhD! A career exploration tool for humanities & social science grad students . “We are excited to announce the launch of ImaginePhD – a free, online career exploration and planning tool designed specifically for Ph.D. students and postdoctoral scholars in humanities and social sciences…. Developed by experts from over 50 universities as part of the Graduate Career Consortium (GCC), ImaginePhD offers a unique platform that teaches PhDs about popular job sectors, search strategies, and how to transfer skills across settings.” This is a Notre Dame announcement, but the ImaginePhD site is useful for students everywhere. It’s also free.

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research. “Twitter may have started out as a way to connect to other people and share news quickly, but the social media platform is also a powerful tool, with the data generated representing the largest publicly accessible archive of human behavior in existence. Guangqing Chi, associate professor of rural sociology and demography and public health sciences in Penn State’s Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education and director of the Computational and Spatial Analysis (CSA) Core in the Social Science Research Institute, and his team have collected over 30 terabytes of geo-tagged tweets over the last four years.”

New Search Engine Tool for Finding Social Sciences Research

A new tool hopes to allow easier access to social sciences research. “MetaBUS… is search engine containing more than a million quantitative findings across 25 years of research and 20-plus journals related to the fields of management, including human resource management and organizational behavior, and psychology, including industrial-organizational and personality. Students and faculty using metaBUS can search over 4,000 topics that are hierarchically arranged. Broader topics, such as job performance and cognitive ability contain narrower ones, such as specific task performance and job knowledge.” I mentioned

SocArXiv Has Officially Launched

SocArXiv has been officially launched. “SocArXiv, the open access, open source archive of social science, is officially launching in beta version today. Created in partnership with the Center for Open Science, SocArXiv provides a free, noncommercial service for rapid sharing of academic papers; it is built on the Open Science Framework, a platform for researchers to upload data and code as well as research results.”