TimeOut: This new Instagram account is calling out the Miami businesses violating social-distancing guidelines

TimeOut: This new Instagram account is calling out the Miami businesses violating social-distancing guidelines. “The number of confirmed coronavirus cases continues to rise in Miami-Dade and some locals are fed up by the negligent behavior causing them to climb. One, in particular, is the person behind the new Instagram account @Covid_305, who, according to their bio, is ‘exposing business not following coronavirus guidelines here in Miami.’ The anonymous account launched on Friday, June 19, and has already chronicled dozens of violations at restaurants, rooftop bars and event spaces across the county.”

‘Rooted in fear’: Two science historians discuss the historical association of disease, shame, and social stigma. (Penn Today)

Penn Today: ‘Rooted in fear’: Two science historians discuss the historical association of disease, shame, and social stigma.. “One of the early cases of COVID-19 spread within the United States happened at a glamorous birthday party in Westport, Connecticut. The event included dinner and dancing with guests that flew in for the occasion, including a man from Johannesburg, South Africa, who developed symptoms on the flight home. Yet the party host would not disclose the guest list to public health officials for contact tracing. Shame and social stigma, says David Barnes, associate professor in the History and Sociology of Science Department, ‘is a huge issue in public health.'”

BuzzFeed News: The Social Media Shame Machine Is In Overdrive Right Now

BuzzFeed News: The Social Media Shame Machine Is In Overdrive Right Now. “When we’re confronted with lived experiences of how the virus works, our first inclination is often to try to solve the puzzle of contamination: Where’d they go wrong? And how can I avoid it? It’s policing masquerading as detective work. I find myself doing something similar every time I open Instagram: This weekend I saw a picture of a gaggle of kids playing in a backyard on a gorgeous Pacific Northwest afternoon. My first thought: No playdates! It took me a moment to realize it was just the family of a friend — who happens to have six children.”

New York Times: Those People We Tried to Cancel? They’re All Hanging Out Together

New York Times: Those People We Tried to Cancel? They’re All Hanging Out Together. “The term for people who have been thrust out of social or professional circles in this way — either online or in the real world or sometimes both — is ‘canceled.'”

The Verge: Facebook won’t call users ‘undesirable’ in ad rejections anymore

The Verge: Facebook won’t call users ‘undesirable’ in ad rejections anymore. “Facebook used the word when rejecting ads that featured people who were overweight or had skin conditions, and it kept removing ads placed by body positivity communities. The company maintains that moderators were never instructed to strike down ads depicting people as ‘undesirable,’ but it’s since updated its language to remove the word from the rejection messages potential platform advertisers receive.”

Betches: A Company Shamed An Applicant For Her IG Pic & It’s Backfiring Spectacularly

Betches: A Company Shamed An Applicant For Her IG Pic & It’s Backfiring Spectacularly. “Yesterday started out just like any other mediocre American Tuesday. Birds were singing, politicians were tweeting, and millennials around the country were trying to find jobs that would help them pay off their thousands of dollars in student loan debt while simultaneously not making them want to die (aka: the dream).”

Mexico News Daily: Lawmakers describe social media shaming nicknames as ‘digital violence’

Mexico News Daily: Lawmakers describe social media shaming nicknames as ‘digital violence’. “A federal lawmaker has introduced a bill that would ban social media public shaming with the use of ‘Lady’ and ‘Lord’ nicknames, a common practice in Mexico to denounce bad behavior. But critics were quick to come up with a new hashtag for Deputy María de Jesús Rósete Sánchez — #LadyCensura, or Lady Censorship.”

Gizmodo: Firefox May Soon Start Publicly Shaming Sites With Crappy Security

Gizmodo: Firefox May Soon Start Publicly Shaming Sites With Crappy Security. “In the constant battle to ensure your privacy online, there are some precautions you can take to protect yourself, such as avoiding clicking random links and using different passwords for every site. But other measures require some help from the websites you visit, and based on a hidden option found in the latest Firefox beta, Mozilla may start publicly shaming websites that are still clinging on to HTTP.”

Nautilus: How Social Media Exploits Our Moral Emotions

Nautilus: How Social Media Exploits Our Moral Emotions . “Why does this keep happening? Because the architecture of social media exploits our sense of right and wrong, reaping profit from the pleasure we feel in expressing righteous outrage. The algorithms that undergird the flow of information on social media are, like the sensationalist print media and incendiary talk radio that came before them, designed to maximize ad revenue by engaging consumers’ attention to the fullest extent possible. Or as novelist John Green puts it, ‘Twitter is not designed to make you happier or better informed. It’s designed to keep you on Twitter.'”

Outside: The Social-Media Sleuths Hunting Down Moose Harassers

Outside: The Social-Media Sleuths Hunting Down Moose Harassers. “On May 4, a man chased a moose onto the median of a busy stretch of highway in Frisco, Colorado. The man stood casually next to the moose with his hands in his pockets, like he was standing with a friend. The moose, awkwardly marooned on a narrow patch of dirt, was visibly agitated, its ears drawn back and hackles raised. A startled motorist slowed so his passenger could take a photo of the scene. He posted it on social media.”

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions

Inquirer: Traffic violators in China pay ‘fine’ with social media confessions. “What if you could pay a fine for a traffic offense with a post online? In southwestern China, traffic violators get off the hook over a minor offense if they admit to their blunder on social media—and earn at least 20 likes, reports Beijing News.”

China Court Uses Social Media to Shame Debtors: China Daily (US News & World Report)

US News & World Report: China Court Uses Social Media to Shame Debtors: China Daily. “A local court in the eastern Chinese city of Wenzhou is using social media to shame people into repaying their debts, the China Daily reported on Tuesday. Citizens who ignore court repayment orders have been subjected to targeted advertisements on the popular Chinese social media app WeChat, notifying their contacts about the amount of money they owe, the paper said.”

Arizona Using Social Media To Shame “Deadbeat” Parents

The state of Arizona is using social media to shame “deadbeat” parents. The headline is “deadbeat dads” but women, albeit fewer, are on the list too. “Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey this week launched a campaign to crack down on ‘the worst of the worst’ parents who are ignoring child support payments, posting their names and photos to Twitter and Facebook. The hope is that the public shaming will make some of them pay up and give other dads (and moms) second thoughts about evading child support.”