Science Blog: Internet May Be Secular, But Religious Americans Aren’t Worried

Science Blog: Internet May Be Secular, But Religious Americans Aren’t Worried. “Despite the pervasive use of the Internet in everyday life, most Americans report they never use it to find religious or spiritual content, and most never use it to share religious views, according to the Baylor Religion Survey. That holds true regardless of religious tradition, said Baylor University sociologists, who recently presented the latest survey findings at the Religion Newswriters Association’s annual conference.”

Census Bureau: New American Community Survey Statistics for Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Available for States and Local Areas

Census Bureau: New American Community Survey Statistics for Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Available for States and Local Areas. “The U.S. Census Bureau today released its most detailed look at America’s people, places and economy with new statistics on income, poverty, health insurance and more than 40 other topics from the American Community Survey.”

Tweet life vs. street life: Exploring the gap between content and feelings (Phys.org)

Phys.org: Tweet life vs. street life: Exploring the gap between content and feelings . “Twitter is an unreliable witness to the world’s emotions, according to University of Warwick sociology expert Dr Eric Jensen. In a new paper published today, Dr Jensen, Associate Professor in the University of Warwick’s Department of Sociology, highlights the risks of assuming that Twitter accurately reflects real life.”

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research

Penn State University: Twitter data changing future of population research. “Twitter may have started out as a way to connect to other people and share news quickly, but the social media platform is also a powerful tool, with the data generated representing the largest publicly accessible archive of human behavior in existence. Guangqing Chi, associate professor of rural sociology and demography and public health sciences in Penn State’s Department of Agricultural Economics, Sociology, and Education and director of the Computational and Spatial Analysis (CSA) Core in the Social Science Research Institute, and his team have collected over 30 terabytes of geo-tagged tweets over the last four years.”

Using Twitter as a data source: an overview of social media research tools (updated for 2017) (LSE Impact Blog)

From the LSE Impact Blog: Using Twitter as a data source: an overview of social media research tools (updated for 2017). “Following his initial post on this topic in 2015, Wasim Ahmed has updated and expanded his rundown of the tools available to social scientists looking to analyse social media data. A number of new applications have been released in the intervening period, with the increasing complexity of certain research questions also having prompted some tools to increase their data retrieval functionalities. Although platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp have more active users, Twitter’s unique infrastructure and the near-total availability of its data have ensured its popularity among researchers remains high.”

Phys.org: Researchers test ‘social contagion’ in laboratory setting

Phys.org: Researchers test ‘social contagion’ in laboratory setting . “Social contagion describes the propagation of beliefs, evaluations and attitudes through a network of people. It’s well understood that political beliefs, emotional attitudes and opinions are contagious within a network, but the precise mechanisms and dynamics are not well understood for two reasons: the complexity of network structures, and the behavioral processes that operate within the network.”

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization

Phys.org: How social media has synchronized human civilization. “Human activity, whether commercial or social, contains patterns and moments of synchronicity. In recent years, social media like Twitter has provided an unprecedented volume of data on the daily activities of humans all over the world. Observing this activity on the scale of a city, a continent, or the globe reveals the patterns. In a paper published by the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers at the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) have observed a new pattern of synchronized activity: a simultaneous peak of Twitter activity stretching across half the planet, from Europe and Africa to Asia and Oceania.”