Joy Online: Hacklab foundation to create an open database for Ghanaian developers

Joy Online: Hacklab foundation to create an open database for Ghanaian developers. “With about a dozen hubs spurring innovation and growth in tech, the developer and tech community in Ghana continues to grow steadily. It has become prudent to map out the ecosystem and understand what gaps and opportunities exist.”

TechCrunch: Facebook to warn third-party developers of vulnerable code

TechCrunch: Facebook to warn third-party developers of vulnerable code. “In a blog post announcing the change,Facebook said it ‘may occasionally find’ critical bugs and vulnerabilities in third-party code and systems. ‘When that happens, our priority is to see these issues promptly fixed, while making sure that people impacted are informed so that they can protect themselves by deploying a patch or updating their systems.’ Facebook has previously notified third-party developers of vulnerabilities, but the policy shift formally codifies the company’s policy toward disclosing and revealing security vulnerabilities.”

TNW: Twitter’s new API encourages devs to craft powerful third-party apps and useful bots

TNW: Twitter’s new API encourages devs to craft powerful third-party apps and useful bots. “Twitter‘s had a rocky relationship with third-party developers creating apps on top of the service. Over the years, it has introduced limitations for apps such as the active number of tokens and the number of actions (you know, tweets, retweets, likes, and DMs) within a time frame, making it difficult to craft things like alternative Twitter clients. But Twitter wants to put all that in the past, as it launched its new API last night. The company now wants to play fair with developers and even encourage them to make helpful bots.” Fool me once, etc etc. Pouring one out for ListiMonkey.

Silicon Angle: Google launches new resource for Chrome OS developers

Silicon Angle: Google launches new resource for Chrome OS developers. “Google LLC today published a new resource for developers interested in building apps for the company’s Chrome OS, the operating system that powers its ecosystem of Chromebook computers. In a blog post, Iein Valdez, head of Chrome OS developer relations, said Chromebooks, along with traditional laptops, are seeing a renaissance of sorts thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic that has forced people to spend more time indoors. With so much time on their hands, people are increasingly putting down their mobile phones in favor of larger screens.”

The Register: Babe, I’ve changed! Twitter wants to try a relationship again with devs after first major API tweaks in years

The Register: Babe, I’ve changed! Twitter wants to try a relationship again with devs after first major API tweaks in years. “For the first time in eight years, Twitter plans to introduce a major revision to its API that describes how developers can access the platform’s data. In doing so, the shouty social network is making yet another attempt to stabilize its development platform and earn the trust of individual, academic, and corporate coders whose software might just make the company more valuable.”

IT Pro Today: 2020 Open Source Conferences That Have Moved Online

IT Pro Today: 2020 Open Source Conferences That Have Moved Online. “Although open source developers are unlikely to fly to some cool and groovy city to spend a few days fellowshipping and learning from fellow geeks, they can still attend open source conferences from the comfort of their shelter-in-place abode, since many of the cancelled conferences are holding safe and sanitary online conferences. Even better news: Attending a conference in person can cost a king’s ransom once attendees shell out $1,000 or more for admission to a major event, plus airfare and hotel fees. In contrast, most of these virtual conferences are absolutely free. All anyone has to do is register.”

TechCrunch: Twitter rewrites Developer Policy to better support academic research and use of ‘good’ bots

TechCrunch: Twitter rewrites Developer Policy to better support academic research and use of ‘good’ bots. “Twitter today updated its Developer Policy to clarify rules around data usage, including in academic research, as well as its position on bots, among other things. The policy has also been entirely rewritten in an effort to simplify the language used and make it more conversational, Twitter says. The new policy has been shortened from eight sections to four, and the accompanying Twitter Developer Agreement has been updated to align with the Policy changes, as well.”

TechCrunch: Twitter opens its ‘Hide Replies’ feature to developers

TechCrunch: Twitter opens its ‘Hide Replies’ feature to developers. “Last November, Twitter rolled out its Hide Replies feature to all users worldwide. The feature, largely designed to lessen the power of online trolls to disrupt conversations, lets users decide which replies to their tweets are placed behind an extra click. Today, Twitter is making Hide Replies available to its developer community, allowing for the creation of tools that help people hide the replies to their tweets faster and more efficiently, says Twitter.”

Google Blog: Come celebrate the art of indie games with us

Google Blog: Come celebrate the art of indie games with us. “This year we will host three competitions for indie game developers from Japan, South Korea and several European countries. The top 20 creators in each region will be chosen to showcase their games at public events in Tokyo, Seoul and Warsaw. Players, industry experts and the Google Play team will vote to select the top 10, and from there, three winners for each regional contest will be crowned.”

Medium: Google’s Monopoly is Stifling Free Software

Medium: Google’s Monopoly is Stifling Free Software. “Google has an undeniable monopoly on search, and a near-monopoly on web browsing software via Chrome and its forks. And even alternative browsers such as Mozilla’s Firefox reference Google’s Safe Browsing service to decide on the trustworthiness of downloads. Stopping the spread of malware is a laudible goal, but a consequence of this is directly harming free and open source software developers from being able to release their software without paying expensive certificate authority rent-seeking fees.”

The Conversation: Why all children must learn code

The Conversation: Why all children must learn code. “Coding language develops the software that can effectively deal with problems and challenges – for instance, because of coding, people who couldn’t get a bank account can now keep, send and borrow money using mobile phones. It’s an important skill to have as countries develop. In the past four decades, several studies have assessed the effect of learning code on primary school children – usually between the ages of six and 13. In each case, the findings show that it is beneficial to children, irrespective of their career path later on in life.”

Northern Arizona University: Can open source software be gender-biased? Yes, say professors who are working to eliminate gender-biased ‘bugs’

Northern Arizona University: Can open source software be gender-biased? Yes, say professors who are working to eliminate gender-biased ‘bugs’ . “The cycle of open source software (OSS) development and gender representation is, perhaps, unsurprising—women are vastly underrepresented among OSS developers. As a result, women miss out on development and professional opportunities, and as jobs in OSS development open up, women lack the experience to get them. And the cycle continues. It’s so pervasive that it’s likely built right into the software itself, say four researchers, which is an entirely separate problem—one they’re aiming to resolve through finding these bugs and proposing redesigns around them, leading to more gender-inclusive tools used by software developers.”

CyLab: This new tool for developers can help preserve app users’ privacy

CyLab: This new tool for developers can help preserve app users’ privacy . “When writing the code for an app using Coconut, the plugin’s heuristics automatically detect when a request for user data is made, triggering a popup reminder to the developer to write an annotation explaining the reasons behind their request. Rather than requiring them to write one from scratch, developers have the option of choosing one from a list of pre-written annotations explaining the reason behind the request, such as, ‘Data collection for advertising,’ ‘Location-based game,’ or ‘Maps and navigation,’ among others.”

CNET: GitHub blocked developers in Iran, Syria and Crimea due to US sanctions

CNET: GitHub blocked developers in Iran, Syria and Crimea due to US sanctions. “Software development platform GitHub is essential to developers across the globe. Unfortunately for users in Iran, Syria and Crimea, access is getting squeezed, thanks to US trade law.”