The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research

The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research. “The identification of proper names of people, organizations, and locations from raw texts, referred to as Named Entity Recognition (NER), can be highly accurate when researchers use NER tools on a large collection of text with proper syntax. However, using existing NER tools for analyzing social media text can lead to poor identification of named entities. In particular, Twitter text frequently includes inconsistent capitalization, spelling errors, and shortened versions of words. TwitterNER, an open-source tool developed by doctoral student Shubhanshu Mishra, who is supervised by Assistant Professor Jana Diesner, can help researchers interested in performing NER on social media text.”

BetaNews: Avast pulls the latest version of CCleaner following privacy controversy

BetaNews: Avast pulls the latest version of CCleaner following privacy controversy. “Piriform rolled out updates for CCleaner on a monthly basis, and this is something that has continued since Avast took over. The latest update, CCleaner 5.45, wasn’t at all well received due to a number of changes affecting privacy, and the company’s response to the matter proved to be unsatisfactory — to say the least. Now it seems that Avast has seen the light, and pulled the latest update.”

FOSS4GNA2018: The free & open source software for geospatial conference, St. Louis, MO. (Stanford Libraries Blog)

Stanford Libraries Blog: FOSS4GNA2018: The free & open source software for geospatial conference, St. Louis, MO.. “I’ve just returned from a week in St. Louis, for FOSS4GNA, the Free & Open Source Software for Geospatial conference, where the predominant topics this year were increasing integration of R and RStudio into the geospatial toolkit, big geospatial data management and analysis, and the management and analysis of an increasing array of high-resolution and high-cadence satellite imagery sources. A number of the presentations and workshops were worth passing along to Stanford ‘geo’ users, and are noted, below.”

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE). “Computer History Museum (CHM), the world’s leading institution exploring the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, today announced the public release and long-term preservation of the Eudora source code, one of the early successful email clients, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh.” I miss Eudora a lot.

EurekAlert: New software, HyperTools, transforms complex data into visualizable shapes

EurekAlert: New software, HyperTools, transforms complex data into visualizable shapes . “Every dataset in the observable universe has a fundamental geometry or shape to it, but that structure can be highly complicated. To make it easier to visualize complicated datasets, a Dartmouth research team has created HyperTools– an open-source software package that leverages a suite of mathematical techniques to gain intuitions about high-dimensional datasets through the underlying geometric structures they reflect. The findings are published in the Journal of Machine Learning Research.”

Martin Pitt: De-Googling my phone

Martin Pitt: De-Googling my phone. “On a few long weekends this year it got a hold of me, and I had a look over the Google fence to see how Free Software is doing on Android and how to reduce my dependency on Google Play Services and Google apps. Less because I would actually severely distrust Google, as they have a lot of business and goodwill to lose if they ever majorly screw up; but more because of simple curiosity and for learning new things. I want to note down my experience here for sharing and discussing. I started experimenting on my old Nexus 4 by completely blanking it and installing current LineageOS 14.1 without the Google apps. This provides a nice testing ground that is completely free of any proprietary Google stuff. From that I can apply good solutions on my ‘production’ Xperia.”

Digital Trends: The best free music players

Digital Trends: The best free music players. “Although music streaming services may be some of the most popular ways to consume music today, that’s not the case for everyone. For those with their own local collections, you need a decent music player, and sometimes Windows Media Player just doesn’t cut it. Here is our guide to the best free music players for Windows PCs. This list contains applications for both the hardest of hardcore music lovers, and for listeners that prefer to use something more simplistic.”