Motherboard: Flight Simulator Add-On Tried to Catch Pirates By Installing Password-Stealing Malware on Their Computers

Motherboard: Flight Simulator Add-On Tried to Catch Pirates By Installing Password-Stealing Malware on Their Computers. “Piracy is an issue for games and other software developers. Some handle it in novel ways, like deliberately making pirated versions of a game near unplayable, or by releasing their software for free. One piece of flight simulator software had an unusual, and controversial technique: infecting pirates with malware designed to steal their Chrome passwords.”

YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data

YaleNews: Project revives old software, preserves ‘born-digital’ data. “Digital preservationists at Yale University Library are building a shareable ’emulation as a service’ infrastructure to resurrect thousands of obsolete software programs and ensure that the information produced on them will be kept intact and made easily available for future access, study, and use.”

BetaNews: Top 5 free data recovery tools for Windows

BetaNews: Top 5 free data recovery tools for Windows. “In a sense it can be hard to judge the quality of a data recovery app. To a large degree success rates are determined by the quality of the data that you’re trying to recover. If you’re relying on software to get your data back, you will have to accept that there are some situations that apps simply cannot cope with — such as when data has been overwritten numerous times, or in the case of severe physical damage. You may still be able to get your data back by calling in the experts, but this can be an expensive option. It makes perfect sense to try going down the free route first of all, so here — in no particular order, as different situations require different apps — are five free data recovery tools that might just do the trick…”

The Register: Open source turns 20 years old, looks to attract normal people

The Register, with a bit of a mean headline: Open source turns 20 years old, looks to attract normal people. “The Open Source Initiative, a non-profit that advocates open source development and non-proprietary software, pegs the date of inception at February 3, 1998. That’s when the term ‘open source’ was proposed by Christine Peterson during a meeting convened to build upon interest arising from the decision by browser maker Netscape to release its source code.”

Best product key finders: How to find that missing software license for free (Digital Trends)

Digital Trends: Best product key finders: How to find that missing software license for free. “Product keys, software licenses, serial numbers — they all seem to disappear completely when you need them most. Perhaps you need to reinstall a program, or worse, an entire operating system, but can’t locate the original case, manual, or that ancient email you deleted more than a year ago. It’s not a far-fetched scenario by any means, and finding the missing info will definitely take up a chunk of your time, typically requiring you to be placed on hold with customer service for longer than you would like. Fortunately, there are scores of product key finders that will scan your system and compile an extensive report of any keys they find.”

New York Times: How Antivirus Software Can Be Turned Into a Tool for Spying

New York Times: How Antivirus Software Can Be Turned Into a Tool for Spying. “Security software runs closest to the bare metal of a computer, with privileged access to nearly every program, application, web browser, email and file. There’s good reason for this: Security products are intended to evaluate everything that touches your machine in search of anything malicious, or even vaguely suspicious. By downloading security software, consumers also run the risk that an untrustworthy antivirus maker — or hacker or spy with a foothold in its systems — could abuse that deep access to track customers’ every digital movement.”

Bleeping Computer: Terdot Banking Trojan Grows Into a Sophisticated Threat

Bleeping Computer: Terdot Banking Trojan Grows Into a Sophisticated Threat. “A banking trojan first observed in October 2016 has grown into a sophisticated hacking tool that works primarily as a banking trojan, but could also be used as an infostealer or backdoor. Named Terdot, this new malware is not a widespread threat, just yet. For now, the banking trojan has been seen targeting the customers of Canadian banks, distributed via the Sundown exploit kit and through spam email.”