Make Tech Easier: 5 Useful Tools For Batch-Editing Images in Windows

Make Tech Easier: 5 Useful Tools For Batch-Editing Images in Windows. “Sometimes you just have a whole mountain of images you need to edit. Perhaps you need them all at a specific size or want them all to follow a specific naming convention. Before you open them all and edit them one by one in your favorite image-manipulation program, perhaps consider a batch-editing program to do all the hard work for you. If you have a lot of photos to clear and little patience to offer, these handy tools will make life that little bit easier!”

Fast Company: The Internet Archive wants to help you play your favorite Commodore 64 games

Fast Company: The Internet Archive wants to help you play your favorite Commodore 64 games. “The nonprofit digital library said it is in the process of adding in-browser emulation support for Commodore 64, aka the best-selling computer in history. The busy bees over at the Internet Archive have already tested over 10,500 programs and are adding more.”

Communications of the ACM: Building the Universal Archive of Source Code

Communications of the ACM: Building the Universal Archive of Source Code. “Software source code is a precious, unique form of knowledge. It can be readily translated into a form executable by a machine, and yet it is human readable: Harold Abelson wrote ‘Programs must be written for humans to read,’1 and source code is the preferred form for modification of software artifacts by developers.3 Quite differently from other forms of knowledge, we have grown accustomed to use version-control systems that trace source code development, and provide precious insight into its evolution. As Len Shustek puts it, ‘Source code provides a view into the mind of the designer.’4 And yet, we have not been taking good care of this precious form of knowledge.”

The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research

The iSchool at Illinois: Diesner and Mishra publish paper on NER tool for social media research. “The identification of proper names of people, organizations, and locations from raw texts, referred to as Named Entity Recognition (NER), can be highly accurate when researchers use NER tools on a large collection of text with proper syntax. However, using existing NER tools for analyzing social media text can lead to poor identification of named entities. In particular, Twitter text frequently includes inconsistent capitalization, spelling errors, and shortened versions of words. TwitterNER, an open-source tool developed by doctoral student Shubhanshu Mishra, who is supervised by Assistant Professor Jana Diesner, can help researchers interested in performing NER on social media text.”

BetaNews: Avast pulls the latest version of CCleaner following privacy controversy

BetaNews: Avast pulls the latest version of CCleaner following privacy controversy. “Piriform rolled out updates for CCleaner on a monthly basis, and this is something that has continued since Avast took over. The latest update, CCleaner 5.45, wasn’t at all well received due to a number of changes affecting privacy, and the company’s response to the matter proved to be unsatisfactory — to say the least. Now it seems that Avast has seen the light, and pulled the latest update.”

FOSS4GNA2018: The free & open source software for geospatial conference, St. Louis, MO. (Stanford Libraries Blog)

Stanford Libraries Blog: FOSS4GNA2018: The free & open source software for geospatial conference, St. Louis, MO.. “I’ve just returned from a week in St. Louis, for FOSS4GNA, the Free & Open Source Software for Geospatial conference, where the predominant topics this year were increasing integration of R and RStudio into the geospatial toolkit, big geospatial data management and analysis, and the management and analysis of an increasing array of high-resolution and high-cadence satellite imagery sources. A number of the presentations and workshops were worth passing along to Stanford ‘geo’ users, and are noted, below.”

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: Computer History Museum Makes the Eudora Email Client Source Code Available to the Public (PRESS RELEASE). “Computer History Museum (CHM), the world’s leading institution exploring the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, today announced the public release and long-term preservation of the Eudora source code, one of the early successful email clients, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh.” I miss Eudora a lot.