PV Magazine: Politicians talk a green game, but do they have solar on their home rooftops?

PV Magazine: Politicians talk a green game, but do they have solar on their home rooftops?. “A Google Maps view of [Governor Gavin] Newsom’s panel-less roof can be seen on a new website… which is out to name names on the politicians who are — or aren’t — backing up their public support for solar with rooftop installations at home. The project is the brainchild of solar sales consultant Nick Thorsch, who recently launched the website, looking first at the rooftops of all 50 state governors’ official mansions and their personal homes.”

Energy Voice: Total and Google create tool to ‘map’ solar potential of European homes

Energy Voice: Total and Google create tool to ‘map’ solar potential of European homes. “‘Solar Mapper’ aims to accelerate the deployment of solar panels for individuals, providing ‘an accurate and rapid estimate of the solar energy potential of their homes’. The tool will be rolled out for Europe and then worldwide.”

“Bright spot” during COVID-19: Increased power from solar panels thanks to cleaner air (EurekAlert)

EurekAlert: “Bright spot” during COVID-19: Increased power from solar panels thanks to cleaner air. “During the COVID-19 pandemic, one unexpected outcome in cities around the world has been a reduction in air pollution, as people stay home to avoid contracting the coronavirus. Based on data collected in Delhi, India, researchers report that this cleaner air has led to more sunlight reaching solar panels, resulting in the production of more clean energy. The work appears June 19 in the journal Joule.”

Australian Energy Market Operator: DER register goes live

Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO): DER register goes live. “On 1 March 2020 Australia will have its first database of distributed energy resources (DER) installed throughout the National Electricity Market (NEM) when the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) launches its DER Register. Distributed energy resources are consumer-owned devices that can generate (rooftop solar) or store electricity (batteries, electric vehicles), or have ‘smart’ capabilities to actively manage energy usage (air conditioners, pool pumps, etc).”

State of Michigan: EGLE launches unique renewable energy ordinance database of Michigan communities

State of Michigan: EGLE launches unique renewable energy ordinance database of Michigan communities. “The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) today launched a unique searchable database of municipal ordinances across Michigan that address siting for renewable energy installations. The database was developed in collaboration with the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. Over half of Michigan’s more than 1,800 municipalities have considered renewable energy in their zoning ordinances. The renewable energy zoning database is the first compilation of all renewable energy ordinances across the state and the first database of its kind in the nation.”

Wired: To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source

Wired: To Go Green, the Energy Industry Goes Open Source . “Unlike more predictable sources of energy, the energy produced by a wind farm can vary from day to day, forcing utilities to offload excess supplies and make up for shortages. The solar panels on residential rooftops that feed into the grid pose their own challenges because the grid wasn’t designed to facilitate a two-way flow of energy. To meet those technological challenges, the energy sector is turning to open source software.”

Data Center Knowledge: Google Takes Big Step Toward Powering Itself With Renewables Around the Clock

Data Center Knowledge: Google Takes Big Step Toward Powering Itself With Renewables Around the Clock. “Google, which competes only with Facebook for the title of the world’s largest corporate buyer of renewable energy, today announced another big round of investments in renewables, claiming it’s ‘the biggest corporate purchase of renewable energy in history.'”

TechXplore: Release of solar panel dataset helps cities make power grids more safe, reliable

TechXplore: Release of solar panel dataset helps cities make power grids more safe, reliable. “Engineers from the Australian National University and Fraunhofer-Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Germany, have provided a freely available quality-controlled and tuned dataset from 1,287 residential installations across Australia. The dataset is presented in the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy. Describing the dataset as ‘a gift’ for solar researchers, author Jamie Bright said, ‘No one has delivered a freely accessible piece of data that has six months’ worth of measurements from three different cities. That is a significant amount.'”

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels. “As the use of renewable energy, in this case solar power, continues to rise in the US, there’s also a growing need to better understand not just how much of the country’s energy comes from solar, but also how many solar panels are in use and where they are installed. While the government and utilities can offer estimates on commercial installations, the lack of data on individual residential installations makes these inaccurate. That’s where Stanford University’s DeepSolar Project aims to help.”

Tech Xplore: Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning

Tech Xplore: Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning. “Knowing which Americans have installed solar panels on their roofs and why they did so would be enormously useful for managing the changing U.S. electricity system and to understanding the barriers to greater use of renewable resources. But until now, all that has been available are essentially estimates. To get accurate numbers, Stanford University scientists analyzed more than a billion high-resolution satellite images with a machine learning algorithm and identified nearly every solar power installation in the contiguous 48 states.”

NREL: NREL Opens Large Database of Inorganic Thin-Film Materials

NREL: NREL Opens Large Database of Inorganic Thin-Film Materials. “An extensive experimental database of inorganic thin-film materials that organizes a decade’s worth of research at the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now publicly available. The High Throughput Experimental Materials (HTEM) Database contains more than 140,000 sample entries collected by NREL scientists investigating inorganic materials for use in advanced energy applications, such as thin-film solar cells. The entries provide details about the structural, chemical, and optoelectronic properties of the materials, and their synthesis conditions.”

Union of Concerned Scientists: Where Are the Solar Jobs? New Resource Can Tell You

Union of Concerned Scientists: Where Are the Solar Jobs? New Resource Can Tell You. “A new tool from The Solar Foundation breaks down the latest solar jobs numbers by state, metropolitan area, county, and congressional district, and looks at who makes up the solar industry…. The interactive map…slices and displays the solar census data for 2017 in a range of ways.”

Australian solar database – 161 projects, and 19GW of capacity (Renew Economy)

Renew Economy: Australian solar database – 161 projects, and 19GW of capacity. “RenewEconomy and consultancy Sunwiz are proud to announce the commencement of a new service tracking Australian solar farms that will bring you all the information you need to understand the outlook for Australian solar farms. We will be bringing you regular updates within our newsletters, with full details on each individual project available for service subscribers.”

Google Sunroof Expands to all 50 US States

Google Sunroof has expanded to all 50 states in the US. “For every building included in the data, Project Sunroof calculates the amount of sunlight received by each portion of the roof over the course of a year, taking into account weather patterns, position of the sun in the sky at different times of year, and shade from nearby obstructions like trees and tall buildings. Finally, the estimated sunlight is translated into energy production using industry standard models for solar installation performance.”