The Verge: TikTok turned his song into a creepy meme — until fans took it back

The Verge: TikTok turned his song into a creepy meme — until fans took it back. “Unlike most content fights, this one has mostly taken place among users, avoiding top-down moderation in favor of mass action within the strange ecosystem of TikTok. But for [Jonathan] Visger and other musicians who have used the platform to reach a new audience, it’s an ugly reminder of how little control there is over how a song is used, and how hard it can be to take back your work.”

CNET: Spotify now lets you save unlimited songs to your library

CNET: Spotify now lets you save unlimited songs to your library. “Spotify on Tuesday said it’s dumping the 10,000-item limit on ‘Your Library,’ meaning users can now save an unlimited collection of songs, albums and podcasts. The move should make serious music fans happy, with Spotify saying people have been requesting the change for years.”

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs

Complex: A Toronto Hip-Hop Professor Made a Playlist of Canadian Protest Songs. “Even as protests against racial injustice and police brutality continue to rage on across North America this weekend, there are still some who like to claim that systemic racism somehow doesn’t exist north of the border. We don’t have to tell you how idiotic that statement is—just ask Maestro, or the many other Canadian hip-hop artists who’ve been speaking out about these issues in their music over the last three decades. Echoing these sentiments, the North Side Hip Hop Archive—an ever-growing digital collection of Canadian hip-hop history and culture, spearheaded by Mark V. Campbell, a Toronto professor—recently shared an incendiary playlist showcasing tunes of resistance by Canuck artists over the years.”

Podcast mystery: the hit song that Google couldn’t find (Brisbane Times)

Brisbane Times: Podcast mystery: the hit song that Google couldn’t find. “In February, a 38-year-old filmmaker named Tyler Gillett was coming home from a party in Los Angeles with his wife when he started singing a song he remembered from high school in the ’90s. His wife had never heard of it. Gillett couldn’t believe it because he used to hear it on mainstream pop radio. He got out his phone to find it, but couldn’t remember the name of the song or the name of the band, so he started typing lyrics he remembered into Google. Nothing. He tried all night. Nothing. He sang what he remembered to friends in the coming days. Still nothing. The earworm seemed to have disappeared through a wormhole.”

Man of Many: NSW Police are Using a Smash Mouth Banger to Explain Social Distancing

Man of Many: NSW Police are Using a Smash Mouth Banger to Explain Social Distancing. “Mastering a new skill is never easy. Whether it’s taking on a second language, trying your hand at a musical instrument, or picking up the paintbrush for the first time, not everyone’s noggin is hardwired for learning. One of the easiest ways to circumnavigate the brain drain is by turning new instructions into a tune. Yep, just like Mary Poppins told us, the best way to remember something is to put it into song. So when the NSW Police Service wanted to warn us of the dire implications of not abiding by social distancing measures, they turned to a modern miracle of musical excellence. That’s right, All-Star by Smashmouth.”

The Verge: This handwashing lyrics generator is here to save you from singing Happy Birthday

The first time I tried this it timed out, but the second time it worked. You may have to try it a few times. From The Verge: This handwashing lyrics generator is here to save you from singing Happy Birthday. “By this point, everyone (hopefully) knows that you should be washing your hands for at least 20 seconds, or as long as it takes for you to sing ‘Happy Birthday’ twice, to help prevent the spread of infectious diseases — including the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. But now that we’re several months into the novel coronavirus outbreak, ‘Happy Birthday’ is starting to get a little old (creative hacks aside). So here’s Wash Your Lyrics, a new tool that automatically pairs the lyrics to a song of your choice with instructions on how to wash your hands properly.”

The Verge: This website creates karaoke song versions of any YouTube video

The Verge: This website creates karaoke song versions of any YouTube video. “If you’ve ever tried and failed to find your favorite song in a karaoke song book, you’ll have better luck on Youka, a free website that creates karaoke songs out of any YouTube video. Youka, short for ‘YouTube to karaoke,’ isolates vocals from tracks and pulls lyrics from sites online.”

Geekologie: A Website Where An Artificial Intelligence System Will Write Song Lyrics About Your Topic Of Choice

Geekologie: A Website Where An Artificial Intelligence System Will Write Song Lyrics About Your Topic Of Choice. “These Lyrics Do Not Exist is a website connected to an artificial intelligence system that will write song lyrics about your topic of choice. You just enter that topic (or a person’s name), choose a style of music from country, metal, rock, pop, EDM, or rap, and whether you want the tone of the song to be very sad, sad, neutral, happy, or very happy.” Not going to admit how long I spent here generating pop songs with my husband’s name in them.

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon

KHON: Creative couple comes together to create Hawaiian-language themed cartoon. “A creative couple used their family as inspiration for a passion project that teaches kids about island culture. Mom is a singer, dad a graphic designer. They merged their creativity to create a labor of love: Makaʻiwa Keiki.” It’s a YouTube channel to teach kids Hawaiian language. I can easily imagine absentmindedly singing the counting to ten song, but I’ll have to play the ʻHead-Shoulders-Knees-and-Toesʻ Song at quarter-speed to learn to say “toes.”

The Verge: I climbed onto my roof for this Pearl Jam app

The Verge: I climbed onto my roof for this Pearl Jam app. “There is only one man who could get me to soberly climb onto my building’s rooftop for a gimmicky artificial reality app in the middle of February, and his name is Eddie Vedder, the frontman of ‘90s Seattle grunge group Pearl Jam. On Thursday, Pearl Jam rolled out a snippet of a new song entitled ‘Superblood Wolfmoon’ that you can only listen to by pointing your phone at the Moon.”

New York Times: What Happens When You Get Famous Off One Song?

New York Times: What Happens When You Get Famous Off One Song?. “Last summer, a teenager named Tom Austin decided on a whim to record a rap song. He’d never made music before. But even as he was writing down lyrics — picking out references from an iPhone note of random stuff he’d been keeping — he was strangely sure of himself.”

NewsChannel5 Nashville: App created as networking tool to connect songwriters

NewsChannel5 Nashville: App created as networking tool to connect songwriters. “Noah Cummins, a new artist who graduated from Belmont in 2018, struggled with making connections in the beginning. ‘When I first said, “this is going to be my career, this is what I want to do for the rest of my life,” it was hard for me to go like, “how I am going to talk to someone, and sell myself in 30 seconds,”‘ said Cummins. Now he’s writing with more experienced artists all thanks to an app called We Should Write Sometime.”

EDMtunes: New Web App Allows You To Make Spotify and Apple Music Playlists from DJ Sets

EDMtunes: New Web App Allows You To Make Spotify and Apple Music Playlists from DJ Sets. “Have you ever wanted to seamlessly create playlists based on your favorite DJ sets? Tired of going through Spotify and Apple Music to manually re-create your favorite sets? Well, you are in luck, because a Reddit user has a solution for you.”

Bright Lines: Musicologists Police the Boundaries of Copyright Law (Variety)

Variety: Bright Lines: Musicologists Police the Boundaries of Copyright Law. “Todd Decker is a music historian who chairs the music department at Washington University in St. Louis. A few years ago, a local attorney called the department looking for help on a case. The lawyer represented Flame, a little-known Christian rapper who claimed that Katy Perry had ripped off his song in her 2014 smash hit ‘Dark Horse.’ Decker had never worked on a lawsuit before, but he volunteered his services as a forensic musicologist — an expert who parses melodies and chord structures to determine if two songs are ‘substantially similar.'”