NewsWise: Direct sound printing is a potential game-changer in 3D printing, according to Concordia researchers

NewsWise: Direct sound printing is a potential game-changer in 3D printing, according to Concordia researchers. “Most 3D printing methods currently in use rely either on photo (light)- or thermo (heat)-activated reactions to achieve precise manipulation of polymers. The development of a new platform technology called direct sound printing (DSP), which uses soundwaves to produce new objects, may offer a third option.”

NASA: What Sounds Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover Reveal About Mars

NASA: What Sounds Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover Reveal About Mars. “The result of the recordings: a new understanding of strange characteristics of the Martian atmosphere, where the speed of sound is slower than on Earth – and varies with pitch (or frequency). On Earth, sounds typically travel at 767 mph (343 meters per second). But on Mars, low-pitched sounds travel at about 537 mph (240 meters per second), while higher-pitched sounds move at 559 mph (250 meters per second).”

BBC: First at-risk Isle of Man sound recordings available online

BBC: First at-risk Isle of Man sound recordings available online . “The first 100 archive recordings from the Manx Museum archives have been made available online for the first time. It is part of the British Library’s £9.3m Unlocking Our Sound Heritage project to digitise historic and culturally significant sound files. Some of the recordings date back as far as the early 1900s.” An additional 500 recordings will come online over the next year.

Blue whales: An acoustic library helps us find what we can’t see (Christian Science Monitor)

Christian Science Monitor: Blue whales: An acoustic library helps us find what we can’t see. “Reverberating through the ice shelves and gyres of the Southern Ocean are the undersongs of the largest animal that has ever lived on this planet, the Antarctic blue whale. Telling tales of the hunt for krill, of navigation and seduction, these tunes can carry for hundreds of miles. And the world is listening: Moored around Antarctica is a loose ring of passive acoustic monitoring devices, or PAMs, deployed by various academic institutions. Released by oceanographic research vessels, the devices sink to the seafloor where they record a remote and often hostile realm that is practically out of reach of scientists.”

Papua New Guinea Post-Courier: Research into ancestral sounds

Papua New Guinea Post-Courier: Research into ancestral sounds. “Researchers are now putting greater emphasis on studying the ancestral sounds from Papua New Guinea, says Don Niles of the Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies. ‘What if you could hear sounds made in your area over a hundred years ago? Would you recognise the songs or would they be unfamiliar? Are they anything like the songs sung today? Could you understand the words of a story told in your language or would there be too many old words that are hard to understand? Is this story still told today?’ Prof Niles said.”

MakeUseOf: How to Set Up and Use Alexa Routines Triggered by Sounds

MakeUseOf: How to Set Up and Use Alexa Routines Triggered by Sounds. “Alexa is always listening for the wake word (which, by default, is ‘Alexa’). However, Amazon’s digital voice assistant can pick up much more than just your voice commands. Thanks to a feature called Sound Detection, currently available as a public preview, your Amazon Echo can listen out for several other sounds, too, then launch a series of commands in response.”

NASA: Hear Sounds From Mars Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover

NASA: Hear Sounds From Mars Captured by NASA’s Perseverance Rover. “Thanks to two microphones aboard NASA’s Perseverance rover, the mission has recorded nearly five hours of Martian wind gusts, rover wheels crunching over gravel, and motors whirring as the spacecraft moves its arm. These sounds allow scientists and engineers to experience the Red Planet in new ways – and everyone is invited to listen in.”

CNET: How to improve your TV’s speech and get rid of muffled dialog

CNET: How to improve your TV’s speech and get rid of muffled dialog. “If you’re struggling to understand the dialog in your new favorite show, it’s most likely the TV’s tiny speakers that are to blame. However, there could be other causes — for example, if you find that people’s lips are moving but speech isn’t correlating, you may need help with a lip-sync issue. If your main problem is that dialog sounds muffled and incomprehensible, whether you’re using a TV speaker or a separate sound system, here are three things you can do to fix it.”

Tech Xplore: Turning network traffic data into music

Tech Xplore: Turning network traffic data into music. “Cybersecurity analysts deal with an enormous amount of data, especially when monitoring network traffic. If one were to print the data in text form, a single day’s worth of network traffic may be akin to a thick phonebook. In other words, detecting an abnormality is like finding a needle in a haystack.”

The Register: UK’s National Museum of Computing asks tunesmiths to recreate bleeps, bloops, and parps of retro game music

The Register: UK’s National Museum of Computing asks tunesmiths to recreate bleeps, bloops, and parps of retro game music. “The UK’s National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) is running a competition aimed at recreating the bleeps, whistles, and flatulent squawks of video game music from years gone by. It’s all in honour of the 40th anniversary of the BBC Micro, which, if memory serves, was not really a ball of fire in the sound department when put up against the Commodore 64 Sound Interface Device (SID) chip.”

GRAMMY Museum: The GRAMMY Museum Grant Program Awards $220,000 For Exciting Music Research & Sound Preservation Projects

GRAMMY Museum: The GRAMMY Museum Grant Program Awards $220,000 For Exciting Music Research & Sound Preservation Projects. “…the GRAMMY Museum(opens in a new tab)’s Grant Program announced that $220,000 in grants will be awarded to 12 recipients, including UCLA, UC San Diego, The Apollo Theater Foundation and more, to help facilitate a range of research on a variety of music-related subjects, as well as support a number of music and film archiving and preservation programs.”

BetaNews: KB5000842 update is causing high-pitched sound problems for some Windows 10 users

BetaNews: KB5000842 update is causing high-pitched sound problems for some Windows 10 users. “It is a few weeks since Microsoft released the KB5000842 update for Windows 10, and it wasn’t long before the optional patch was linked to problems with game performance. These particular issues have been — mostly — resolved, but KB5000842 remains problematic with users of some 5.1 audio setups complaining that it has results in their computers emitting high-pitched noises.”