Business Insider: SoundCloud’s CEO is stepping down after the company raised a big round of new funding

Business Insider: SoundCloud’s CEO is stepping down after the company raised a big round of new funding. “SoundCloud CEO and cofounder Alex Ljung is stepping down from the top role as the company announces a new round of funding from investors The Raine Group and Temasek. The round reportedly comes in at $170 million (£130 million).”

Digital Trends: Will Soundcloud Bite The Dust? Investors To Determine Its Fate By Friday

Digital Trends: Will Soundcloud Bite The Dust? Investors To Determine Its Fate By Friday. “It turns out that, without a massive parent company like Google, it’s quite difficult for streaming services to turn a profit — especially when your CEO is too busy partying to pay attention. Now, the platform is relying on its investors to stay alive, with a rescue funding round set to close tomorrow, August 11.” Which is today.

TechCrunch: Sick of SoundCloud? Anchor offers podcast transfer with free hosting

TechCrunch: Sick of SoundCloud? Anchor offers podcast transfer with free hosting . “SoundCloud is on shaky financial footing, saying it only has enough money to last a few more months unless someone buys or invests in it. That’s sure to cause anxiety in content creators with their life’s work stored on SoundCloud. Now some new startups are nipping at SoundCloud’s heels by focusing on podcasting in ways the music streaming service never did.”

The Verge: How Soundcloud’s Broken Business Model Drove Artists Away

The Verge: How Soundcloud’s Broken Business Model Drove Artists Away. “In December 2012, as part of a major redesign, SoundCloud introduced a feature called the repost. Similar to Tumblr’s reblog or Twitter’s retweet, reposts were designed as a way to help new music spread virally. But from the start, artists abused the feature by constantly reposting their own tracks, pushing them back to the top of their followers’ feeds every few days. Artist collectives made agreements to repost one another’s songs, and eventually, a popular music blog was caught selling ‘slingshot’ packages that included paid reposts. Fans and artists alike loudly complained — but SoundCloud, which was busy fighting an existential threat from major record labels, didn’t address the abuse for nearly three years.”