Mashable: What is brown noise? TikTok suggests it’s better than white noise.

I am linking to this because I have been Team Brown Noise since I knew about different noise colors, and I’m feeling vindicated. Yes, it’s petty. Mashable: What is brown noise? TikTok suggests it’s better than white noise.. “Whereas white noise encompasses sounds from all over the spectrum, including low, mid-range, and high frequency notes, brown noise uses only low frequency and bass-heavy notes. This makes brown noise much deeper in sound than white noise and more ideal for those who find the high frequency notes in white noise uncomfortable.”

Washington Post: Saving The Sounds Of An Ancient City

Washington Post: Saving The Sounds Of An Ancient City. “For the past several years, Youssef Sherif, 28, and Nehal Ezz, 26, have wandered the Egyptian capital in search of the cries of street vendors, the tap tap tap of metal workers in their shops, the cacophony of chaotic traffic. Their goal is to capture in recordings what Cairo sounds like — right here, right now — before these noises disappear. They are collecting the sounds to share on an Instagram account and eventually hope to establish a searchable database of sounds.”

EurekAlert: Global Library of Underwater Biological Sounds, “GLUBS,” will help monitor changing marine life

EurekAlert: Global Library of Underwater Biological Sounds, “GLUBS,” will help monitor changing marine life. “…a team of 17 experts from nine countries has set a goal of gathering on a single platform huge collections of aquatic life’s tell-tale sounds, and expanding it using new enabling technologies – from highly sophisticated ocean hydrophones and artificial intelligence learning systems to phone apps and underwater GoPros used by citizen scientists. The Global Library of Underwater Biological Sounds, ‘GLUBS,’ will underpin a novel non-invasive, affordable way for scientists to listen in on life in marine, brackish and freshwaters, monitor its changing diversity, distribution and abundance, and identify new species.”

Blue whales: An acoustic library helps us find what we can’t see (Christian Science Monitor)

Christian Science Monitor: Blue whales: An acoustic library helps us find what we can’t see. “Reverberating through the ice shelves and gyres of the Southern Ocean are the undersongs of the largest animal that has ever lived on this planet, the Antarctic blue whale. Telling tales of the hunt for krill, of navigation and seduction, these tunes can carry for hundreds of miles. And the world is listening: Moored around Antarctica is a loose ring of passive acoustic monitoring devices, or PAMs, deployed by various academic institutions. Released by oceanographic research vessels, the devices sink to the seafloor where they record a remote and often hostile realm that is practically out of reach of scientists.”

Papua New Guinea Post-Courier: Research into ancestral sounds

Papua New Guinea Post-Courier: Research into ancestral sounds. “Researchers are now putting greater emphasis on studying the ancestral sounds from Papua New Guinea, says Don Niles of the Institute of Papua New Guinea Studies. ‘What if you could hear sounds made in your area over a hundred years ago? Would you recognise the songs or would they be unfamiliar? Are they anything like the songs sung today? Could you understand the words of a story told in your language or would there be too many old words that are hard to understand? Is this story still told today?’ Prof Niles said.”

ABC News (Australia): National Film and Sound Archive announces 2021 Sounds of Australia inductees

ABC News (Australia): National Film and Sound Archive announces 2021 Sounds of Australia inductees. “‘For the pain, suffering and hurt of these Stolen Generations, their descendants and for their families left behind, we say sorry.’ These words from Kevin Rudd’s Apology to Australia’s Indigenous Peoples were heard across the country when they were first uttered in 2008, as part of a formal apology on behalf of the Australian Parliament to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Now, they have been added to the National Film and Sound Archive’s (NFSA) Sounds of Australia for 2021.”

Borneo Post: Bengkel Borneo gathers creative talents to create ‘Soundbank’

Borneo Post: Bengkel Borneo gathers creative talents to create ‘Soundbank’. “The online interactive exhibition explores the theme ‘Divided by Lockdowns and Borders, Can We Still Connect Digitally Across Oceans Through Sound?’, and presents words, songs and photographs from Malaysian, Indonesian and British collaborators…. Launched today, Soundbank features recordings in over five indigenous languages, where several are highly-endangered; Kayan, Dusun and Gaelic, to name a few – demonstrating the diversity of the collaborators involved in this international project.”

The Register: UK’s National Museum of Computing asks tunesmiths to recreate bleeps, bloops, and parps of retro game music

The Register: UK’s National Museum of Computing asks tunesmiths to recreate bleeps, bloops, and parps of retro game music. “The UK’s National Museum of Computing (TNMOC) is running a competition aimed at recreating the bleeps, whistles, and flatulent squawks of video game music from years gone by. It’s all in honour of the 40th anniversary of the BBC Micro, which, if memory serves, was not really a ball of fire in the sound department when put up against the Commodore 64 Sound Interface Device (SID) chip.”

National Geographic: You can now hear rainforest sounds worldwide—here’s why that matters

National Geographic: You can now hear rainforest sounds worldwide—here’s why that matters. “Gorillas beating their chests, chimpanzees pant-hooting, elephants rumbling—and poachers firing assault rifles—these are some of the more than a million hours of sounds recorded by a grid of 50 microphones in the Congolese rainforest since 2017. The massive acoustic monitoring effort covers about 480 square miles in the Republic of Congo’s Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park—an area about the size of Los Angeles. It’s part of Cornell University’s Elephant Listening Project, established in 1999 to detect communication among forest elephants and pinpoint poaching activity.”

The Conversation: Kapow! Zap! Splat! How comics make sound on the page

The Conversation: Kapow! Zap! Splat! How comics make sound on the page. “From Wolverine’s SNIKT! when unsheathing his claws, to Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in The Death of Stalin (later made into a film) the use of ‘textual audio’ invites comics readers to hear with their eyes. Fundamental elements such as symbols, font styles and onomatopoeia (where words imitate sounds) mean reading comics is a cross-sensory experience. New and old examples show the endless potential of the artform.”

The Conversation: This is what lockdown sounds like

The Conversation: This is what lockdown sounds like. “Three days after the first lockdown began in the UK, I put out a call via social media to ask for help capturing sounds which had changed as a result of governments’ actions around the world to curb the spread of the virus. It struck me that the extraordinary times in which we found ourselves would be worth documenting as far as the changing soundscape was concerned.”

Bloomberg CityLab: How the Pandemic Changed the Urban Soundscape

Bloomberg CityLab: How the Pandemic Changed the Urban Soundscape. “When cities went on lockdown during the pandemic, things got quieter, but they didn’t fall totally silent. Instead, the hooting of the scops owls became more distinct in Thessaloniki, Greece, where the sound of traffic once drowned them out. Birds in San Francisco sang in softer and clearer tones absent the honking of cars and rumbling of engines. Meanwhile in New York City, the humming of air conditioners from the towering buildings replaced the bustling noise of a once-packed Times Square.”

FAD Magazine: Swiss artist Zimoun to premiere audio performance online

FAD Magazine: Swiss artist Zimoun to premiere audio performance online. “The NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Art Gallery has announced the rollout of its second digital archive: the ZIMOUN exhibition. Going live on June 9, ZIMOUN is the second in a series of launches inviting the public to reunite with curators and artists as part of TRACE: Archives and Reunions. To mark each launch, The NYUAD Art Gallery will host a reunion with the artist. For this reunion, Swiss artist Zimoun will premiere a new work composed specifically for the Gallery’s online audience: a sound performance, to be experienced at home, with headphones, in the dark.”