ABC News: Acoustic observatory will record ‘galaxy of sounds’ to help scientists monitor Australian wildlife

ABC News (Australia): Acoustic observatory will record ‘galaxy of sounds’ to help scientists monitor Australian wildlife. “Hundreds of solar-powered audio recorders are being installed across remote parts of Australia to create a unique ‘soundscape’ as the environment changes. The National Acoustic Observatory project, funded by the Australian Research Council, was a collaboration of academics from five universities.”

Ars Technica: Mapping Notre Dame’s unique sound will be a boon to reconstruction efforts

Ars Technica: Mapping Notre Dame’s unique sound will be a boon to reconstruction efforts. “The acoustics of the cathedral—how it sounds—are also part of its cultural heritage, and given the ephemeral nature of sound, acoustical characteristics can be far trickier to preserve or reproduce. Fortunately, a group of French acousticians made detailed measurements of Notre Dame’s ‘soundscape’ over the last few years, along with two other cathedrals. That data will now be instrumental in helping architects factor acoustics into their reconstruction plans.”

The Verge: This beautiful project creates soundtracks for photographs

The Verge: This beautiful project creates soundtracks for photographs. “The photograph is dark, cooling towers stark against a sky streaked with color. This is the Drax power station in England, a site of pollution and protests. What would it be like to stand at the site? What would this scene sound like? The Drax photo is part of ‘Sound Photography,’ a beautiful new project from Cities and Memory.”

OZY: A Fight Is On To Save The Sounds Of Turkey

OZY: A Fight Is On To Save The Sounds Of Turkey. “For years, the cacophony of Istanbul’s Kumkapi fish market evoked happy memories of childhood for Pinar Çevikayak Yelmi. As a little girl she would wander around the stalls with her father and listen to competing fish sellers holler out a bewildering array of names and prices, and share bursts of rapid repartee with customers. In March 2015, Yelmi was set to record the market for her sound archive ‘The Soundscape of Istanbul,’ but a week before her planned visit the decades-old market was abruptly torn down and its dozens of tenants displaced to make way for a mega infrastructure project — a road tunnel under the Bosporus. Istanbul has multiple fish markets, but few this large or evocative, and Yelmi felt its loss acutely. ‘It had a symbolic value for the city, but now it’s gone,’ she says.”

A Big Archive of Occult Recordings: Historic Audio Lets You Hear Trances, Paranormal Music, Glossolalia & Other Strange Sounds (1905-2007) (Open Culture)

New-to-Me, from Open Culture: A Big Archive of Occult Recordings: Historic Audio Lets You Hear Trances, Paranormal Music, Glossolalia & Other Strange Sounds (1905-2007). “We’ve all had our wits scared out of us by films, images, and the written word, but somehow few forms work their haunting magic quite so effectively as sound alone. Think of the snap of the twig in the woods or the creak of the staircase in the empty house — or, to take it farther, the sound of possessed children speaking in tongues. You can hear recordings of that and other unusual phenomena at Ubuweb, which hosts the collection Occult Voices – Paranormal Music, Recordings of Unseen Intelligences 1905-2007.”

Fast Company: Google Street View Now Has A Soundtrack, Thanks To AI

Fast Company: Google Street View Now Has A Soundtrack, Thanks To AI. “Google Street View has never felt so enchanting. In New York’s Botanical Garden, children shout and play in the distance. On a highway in Shibuya, Tokyo, cars whoosh by with so much detail, you can hear the first drops of rain on the street. At Gaudi’s famous Barcelona cathedral, La Sagranda Familia, a priest chants in Latin as his deep voice echoes around the cavernous space. Yet none of these sounds are real. Or, at least, they weren’t recorded where you see them. Instead, an AI has added a soundtrack to all of Street View, and often, the sounds are so convincing that you would never know they were faked.”