Daily Maverick: SA’s new copyright law, backed by Google, is slated by the creative industry

Daily Maverick: SA’s new copyright law, backed by Google, is slated by the creative industry . “The strangest alliance has been formed between copyright and intellectual property (IP) academics, US tech giant Google and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition, which have collaborated to make South Africa’s copyright law weaker. Opposing this are South Africa’s artists, musicians, authors, filmmakers and others within the creative industry who believe this week’s adoption of the Copyright Amendment Bill and the Performers’ Protection Amendment Bill by the Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition has, in effect, thrown them to the wolves.”

East Coast Radio: Did this woman’s reliance on Google Translate ruin her daughter’s reputation at school?

East Coast Radio: Did this woman’s reliance on Google Translate ruin her daughter’s reputation at school?. “We are not saying that Google Translate isn’t reputable, but we do believe it to be an online resource that is meant to provide an overall understanding. Perhaps not the precise meaning of words… This mother bravely took to TikTok sharing her experience with the service when it came to helping her 11-year-old with her Afrikaans homework.” Laughed myself silly.

IOL (South Africa): ‘Voices of Women Museum’ opens online

IOL (South Africa): ‘Voices of Women Museum’ opens online. ” The ‘Voices of Women Museum’ is now virtual and will be launched on Friday…. Developed as a concept in 2012, the museum has a substantial collection of about 3 000 women’s narratives and story cloths.” You’ll have to give the site a minute to load, but it’s worth the wait. One of the more polished virtual spaces I’ve visited, well done.

New Frame: South African history, through Rashid Lombard’s lens

New Frame: South African history, through Rashid Lombard’s lens. “A tragedy for many South African photographers is the disarray and neglect of their archives. This includes apartheid-era photographers who did not have the resources to preserve their collections. And once they are elderly or die, the responsibility falls to their families, who often don’t have the capacity to honour their archives either. Their legacies risk being lost forever. This makes the project that Lombard and his team are starting profoundly important. He has handed the custodianship of his complete archive to the University of the Western Cape (UWC), with the rights remaining with his family. He is also starting the three-year process of digitising his archive, planning to open a photography centre guided by his vision.”

New York Times: South Africa’s latest surge is a possible preview of the pandemic’s next chapter.

New York Times: South Africa’s latest surge is a possible preview of the pandemic’s next chapter. . “South Africa experienced a decline in cases after hitting an Omicron-fueled, pandemic peak in December. But in the past week, cases have tripled, positivity rates are up and hospitalizations have also increased, health officials said. The surge has the country facing a possible fifth wave. The spike is linked to BA.4 And BA.5, two subvariants that are part of the Omicron family.”

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT

Christian Science Monitor: Why a museum sold Mandela’s arrest warrant as an NFT. “It was the first archival document in South Africa to be sold as an NFT, and the proceeds will benefit the struggling museum that now sits on the site of Liliesleaf Farm. On a continent whose historical artifacts have routinely been plundered by outsiders, the sale has been hailed as a savvy way for African countries to hold on to their heritage while also cashing in on the global elite’s new obsession with digital collectibles. But it also raises concerns about what could happen when the past – or a virtual copy of it – is auctioned off to the highest bidder.”

Daily Maverick: South African History Archive relaunched at Wits

Daily Maverick: South African History Archive relaunched at Wits. “On 6 April, the South African History Archive was officially relaunched at Wits university by its Vice-Chancellor Zeblon Vilakazi. It will form part of an Archives and Research Hub that will give concerted attention to social justice archives. The devastating fire last year at UCT brought the general crisis of archives sharply into focus and it is clear that universities and civil society will need to be more active in this space.”

Free Press Journal: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory launches digital archive for greater public access

Free Press Journal: Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory launches digital archive for greater public access . “A new digital archive was launched on Friday by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory to allow greater public access to the archives of the global icon who became the first democratically-elected president of South Africa after serving 27 years as a political prisoner under the white minority apartheid regime. Razia Saleh, Head of Archive and Research at the centre, explained that the closure of the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory (NMCM) for almost two years due to the COVID-19 lockdown restrictions had given the team time to come up with ideas to widen access to the resources, which have been physically available in the past.”

IOL: African founded AI company could hold key to saving millions of lives during the pandemic

IOL: African founded AI company could hold key to saving millions of lives during the pandemic. “InstaDeep, which was founded in North Africa and has offices around the world including South Africa, teamed up with BioNTech, the German biotech company behind the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine, to develop an AI tool that detects high-risk Sars-CoV-2 variants based on their genetic code. The AI system has already identified more than 90% of variants of concern, on average two months before their designation by the World Health Organization (WHO).”

Nature: South African scientists copy Moderna’s COVID vaccine

Nature: South African scientists copy Moderna’s COVID vaccine. “The company, Afrigen Biologics and Vaccines, in Cape Town, has made only microlitres of the vaccine, based on data that Moderna used to make its shot. But the achievement is a milestone for a major initiative launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) — a technology transfer hub meant to build capacity for vaccine manufacturing in low- and middle-income countries.”