Stabroek News: Virtual platform FineArt.gy launched to showcase Guyanese artwork

Stabroek News: Virtual platform FineArt.gy launched to showcase Guyanese artwork. “The platform allows artists to showcase and sell their work, with information about the various pieces displayed through individualized links created on the website. The display includes paintings, photography, ceramics, sculptures and mixed media. Among others, the website features paintings from Jermana Defreitas, Akeem King and Michael Griffith, along with photography from Reshi Rampersaud, Keno George and Michael Lam.” This site is nominally about ecommerce, but I get so little about Guyana I wanted to include it.

HuffPost: Facebook’s ‘Digital Colonialism’ Made Monday’s Outage A Crisis For The World

HuffPost: Facebook’s ‘Digital Colonialism’ Made Monday’s Outage A Crisis For The World. “The Facebook outage that struck Monday morning and lasted throughout the day was ultimately a minor inconvenience for most Americans. But in countries like Brazil, it caused a destabilizing and disorienting seven hours ― not because Facebook.com was gone, but because WhatsApp, the messaging service the company also owns, suddenly went offline along with it. Still largely an afterthought in the United States, WhatsApp has grown into one of the world’s most vital communications services. More than 2 billion people ― 1 in 4 people on the planet ― use it. Brazil and India alone are home to nearly one-quarter of them.”

New York Times: Covid Ravaged South America. Then Came a Sharp Drop in Infections.

New York Times: Covid Ravaged South America. Then Came a Sharp Drop in Infections.. “There have been no new sweeping or large-scale containment measures in the region, although some countries have imposed strict border controls. A major factor in the recent drop in cases, experts say, is the speed with which the region ultimately managed to vaccinate people. Governments in South America have generally not faced the kind of apathy, politicization and conspiracy theories around vaccines that left much of the United States vulnerable to the highly contagious Delta variant.”

Google Blog: Explore the undeciphered writing of the Incas

Google Blog: Explore the undeciphered writing of the Incas. “‘Khipus,’ which means ‘knots’ in the Quechua language, are the colorful, intricate cords made by the Incas, who inhabited some parts of South America before the Spanish colonization of the Americas. These knotted strings are still an enigma waiting to be unraveled. What secrets are hidden in these colorful knots dating back centuries? What messages from the Incas echo in these intricate cords? Could the ancestral knowledge they hold inform us about our future?

Washington Post: Brazil has become South America’s superspreader event

Washington Post: Brazil has become South America’s superspreader event. “With a sense of dread, the doctor watched the patients stream into his intensive care unit. For weeks, César Salomé, a physician in Lima’s Hospital Mongrut, had followed the chilling reports. A new coronavirus variant, spawned in the Amazon rainforest, had stormed Brazil and driven its health system to the brink of collapse. Now his patients, too, were arriving far sicker, their lungs saturated with disease, and they were dying within days. Even the young and healthy didn’t appear protected. The new variant, he realized, was here.”

Yale News: Yale, Field Museum map species diversity in South American national parks

Yale News: Yale, Field Museum map species diversity in South American national parks. “Park rangers, naturalists, tourists, educators, and land managers can now take a virtual tour of species diversity across three South American countries thanks to a new information dashboard created by researchers at Yale University and the Field Museum in Chicago. The Biodiversity Dashboard lists almost 5,500 species found in and around national parks in three of the world’s most biodiverse countries: Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.”

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources

Houston Chronicle: MFAH unveils new Latin art resources. “The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and its research institute, the International Center for the Arts of the Americas (ICAA), have launched an expanded, redesigned website and database for its Documents of Latin American and Latino Art Digital Archive Project. Begun 20 years ago, the project now offers full, free access to more than 8,200 letters, manifestos, newspaper and journal articles, exhibition reviews and other key theoretical, critical and art-historical texts. The materials include significant writings by artists, critics and curators from Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean and the U.S. Latino communities — many now available for the first time, via a more user friendly platform.”

Phys .org: Big data could yield big discoveries in archaeology, scholar says

Phys .org: Big data could yield big discoveries in archaeology, scholar says. “In a recently released edition of the Journal of Field Archaeology, Brown Assistant Professor of Anthropology Parker VanValkenburgh and several colleagues detailed new research they conducted in the former Inca Empire in South America using drones, satellite imagery and proprietary online databases. Their results demonstrate that big data can provide archaeologists with a sweeping, big-picture view of the subjects they study on the ground—prompting new insights and new historical questions.”

Science Magazine: An integrated assessment of the vascular plant species of the Americas

Science Magazine: An integrated assessment of the vascular plant species of the Americas. “The cataloging of the vascular plants of the Americas has a centuries-long history, but it is only in recent decades that an overview of the entire flora has become possible. We present an integrated assessment of all known native species of vascular plants in the Americas. Twelve regional and national checklists, prepared over the past 25 years and including two large ongoing flora projects, were merged into a single list. Our publicly searchable checklist includes 124,993 species, 6227 genera, and 355 families, which correspond to 33% of the 383,671 vascular plant species known worldwide. In the past 25 years, the rate at which new species descriptions are added has averaged 744 annually for the Americas, and we can expect the total to reach about 150,000.”

Alt Gov 2: Newly Released Photos of Nazi Spies and Enclaves in Chile During WWII

Alt Gov 2: Newly Released Photos of Nazi Spies and Enclaves in Chile During WWII. “On June 22, 2017, the government of Chile released 1,500+ pages of documents about the Nazi enclaves in the country during World War II. In the remote southern regions of Chile and Argentina (in other words, the southern tip of South America), Nazis had set up shop to engage in paramilitary training, intercept Allied radio communications, and plan acts of sabotage, including blowing up the Panama Canal.”

CCNY: CCNY-based DSI launches unique site on early Blacks in the Americas

A new Web site traces the history of the first Black people in the Americas. “The core of [the] new resource comprises a collection of 72 archival document packages. They contain an equal number of manuscripts from 16th century La Española, the Island now shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti. The selected material documents in various ways the presence of the black-African population and their descendants that lived in the island-colony (the first European outpost in the Americas in modern times) during the first 100 years of colonization. It is the first platform to make this kind of collection of sources available on the internet to the general public.”

Digital Archive: The Music of Chilean Political Prisoners

Now available: a digital archive recording the songs and music of Chilean political prisoners. “Cantos Cautivos (Captive Songs) is a digital archive compiled by Katia Chornik, daughter of two opponents of the dictatorship who survived one infamous detention centre, which was named La Discothèque by agents of the Dina secret police because guards deployed loud music to torture their quarry, or as a soundtrack to the abuse. Chornik spent her childhood in exile, between Venezuela and France, returning to Chile with her parents by the end of the dictatorship. She studied violin and musicology in Chile and the UK.”

Now Available: Database of Mesoamerican Ethnobotany

Now available: the Mesoamerican Ethnobotanical Database. “Having already demonstrated that ancient botanical remains could be collected from lowland tropical locations during excavations of prehistoric Maya sites in Belize, the team discovered that few resources existed to identify the family, genus or species of the specimens…. ‘Over the span of four years we identified, located and scanned more than 2,500 plant vouchers [plant samples mounted on 11-by-17-inch sheets of paper] representing more than 1,300 species from 148 plant families,’ [Jon] Hageman said of the tedious process.”

Digital Archive on US-Brazil Relations to Get Expansion

Brown University’s digital archive on the relationship between the US and Brazil is about to get an expansion. “The Brazilian Amnesty Commission and the United Nations Development Programme have awarded Brown University’s Opening the Archives Project a grant to more than double the number of declassified U.S. government documents on Brazil, produced during that country’s military dictatorship of 1964 to 1985, that are publicly accessible through the project’s open-access website.”

Google Street View Adds Imagery From Argentina

Google Street View has added imagery from Argentina. “In its more than 2.7 million square kilometers, Argentina is home of some of the most spectacular natural settings on the globe. Starting today in Street View, you can experience a selection of Argentina’s most breathtaking national parks right from your Google Maps app for Android or iOS.”