WRAL: New research could help preserve Gullah Geechee lands

WRAL: New research could help preserve Gullah Geechee lands. “Organized by the town’s Gullah Geechee Culture and Land Preservation Task Force, the Heritage Library of Hilton Head Island and the University of South Carolina Beaufort, the project aims to help Black Americans known as Gullah or Geechee. These slave descendants retained much of their African heritage passed down from ancestors who grew up isolated on coastal islands off North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Some of the Gullah Geechee land is particularly vulnerable, project organizers said in a statement, because of the way it was passed down without a formal will.”

The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks

New-to-me, and apparently revamped to all our benefit, from The Post and Courier: South Carolina nonprofit creates archive of Palmetto State landmarks. “Today, its website features entries on over 2,000 landmarks. Most are still standing, but the project also catalogues locations that have fallen to ruin or disappeared. In addition to photographs, entries include write-ups adding historical context to the sites, along with addresses, links to similar landmarks and information about any other notable places nearby.”

Charleston City Paper: Over 40 years of Arnold Edmondson’s art cataloged in digital archive

Charleston City Paper: Over 40 years of Arnold Edmondson’s art cataloged in digital archive. “Art historian Naomi Edmondson, the daughter of late Lowcountry artist Arnold Edmondson, recently created an online archive of her father’s expansive body of visual art pieces. Through the archive, Naomi is attempting to digitize over 40 years of visual art from Arnold’s career.”

The Black Craftspeople Digital Archive

I found out about this new site via a virtual event announcement. Apparently it opens in two days: the Black Craftspeople Digital Archive. From the front page: “The Black Craftspeople Digital Archive seeks to enhance what we know about black craftspeople by telling both a spatial story and a historically informed story that highlights the lives of black craftspeople and the objects they produced. The first phase of this project focuses on black craftspeople living and laboring in the eighteenth-century South Carolina Lowcountry.”