Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available. (Digital Library of Georgia)

Digital Library of Georgia: Digitized recordings of the radio program Southwind: The New Sounds of the Old Confederacy now available.. “Atlanta journalist Boyd Lewis conceived, created, produced, and hosted Southwind, a half-hour radio program of features and documentaries on the people, issues, and events of the South. The program aired on WABE-FM in Atlanta between November 14, 1980 and January 29, 1987. The collection contains 150 out of the 177 editions that were recorded. Each of the Southwind programs consisted of one to three segments that featured original reporting either by Mr. Lewis or his colleagues in public radio throughout the Southeast. Many of the segments focused on contemporary events that Mr. Lewis placed in historical context, while other segments were retrospectives of past events that featured the voices of the participants. The segments touched upon a broad range of topics relating to the history of Atlanta and the American South in the mid-to-late 20th century, including the Civil Rights Movement; African American history; city and regional economic and cultural development in the southeast; business and labor history; Atlanta theater; folk life; literature, and political history.”

UNC: Grant Will Help Librarians Examine Jim Crow Laws Through Lens of Data

UNC: Grant Will Help Librarians Examine Jim Crow Laws Through Lens of Data. “Using optical character recognition and machine learning, the team will build a text corpus of North Carolina session laws from the end of the Civil War through the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and will then compile a listing of North Carolina’s Jim/Jane Crow laws. This effort builds upon work done by civil rights pioneer Pauli Murray in the 1950s.”

Eastern Mennonite University: Seven shapes or four notes? If you have an opinion, then you’ll want to know ‘The Musical Million’ 1879-97 is now online

Eastern Mennonite University: Seven shapes or four notes? If you have an opinion, then you’ll want to know ‘The Musical Million’ 1879-97 is now online. “Giving special thanks to Eastern Mennonite University special collections librarian Simone Horst for her digitalization help, the Library of Virginia’s Virginia Chronicle website has launched a fully searchable run of the music journal, The Musical Million: A Journal of Music, Poetry, and Chaste Home Literature…. The Musical Million spread the Gospel of congregational shape-note singing far and wide and laid the groundwork for the proliferation of singing schools across the South.”

Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online

Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online. “Items on the site are sourced from a mix of local institutions and community members who lent digital copies of resources. Free and downloadable content on local black history is now available on the database compiled by East Tennessee PBS, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s School of Information Sciences, the Greeneville-Greene County History Museum and the George Clem Multicultural Alliance.”

The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth

New-to-me, from The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth. “The Southern furniture historian said the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts is ‘the largest collection of Southern-made material culture in the world and is concentrated on the American South and includes furniture, paintings, metal works, textiles, pottery and some architecture.’…The museum was established in 1965, and its entire collection may be viewed online.”

AP: Project documents hidden history of LGBTQ life in the South

AP: Project documents hidden history of LGBTQ life in the South. “A new project is documenting a once-hidden history of LGBTQ people in the Deep South, with donors providing troves of information and items on gay life, systemic oppression and activism. Historian and archivist Joshua Burford said the goal of the Invisible Histories Project is to create a uniquely Southern collection that will ‘give Southern history back to queer Southerners.'”

University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community

University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community. “An understanding of the power of oral history to tell personal journeys brought together University of Kentucky’s Office of LGBTQ* Resources and Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History to create OutSouth, a unique repository for preserving the stories of LGBTQ* Southerners and/or individuals who have made significant contributions to LGBTQ* life in the U.S. South.” I think the * at the end is supposed to be a wildcard, to include I, etc.