University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community

University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community. “An understanding of the power of oral history to tell personal journeys brought together University of Kentucky’s Office of LGBTQ* Resources and Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History to create OutSouth, a unique repository for preserving the stories of LGBTQ* Southerners and/or individuals who have made significant contributions to LGBTQ* life in the U.S. South.” I think the * at the end is supposed to be a wildcard, to include I, etc.

Charleston City Paper: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative explores Latino communities with Las Voces del Lowcountry

Charleston City Paper: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative explores Latino communities with Las Voces del Lowcountry . “In a tumultuous political landscape that can leave many people of color feeling uneasy or unsafe, one exhibit from the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative (LDHI) seeks to give a voice to the often-overlooked communities of Latinos in the Lowcountry. Las Voces del Lowcountry, a new digital exhibit from Marina López and Kerry Taylor, documents the little-known history of Latinos in the Charleston area through oral interviews conducted between 2012 and 2014, photographs, historic documents, and artistic images.”

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.. “So far, Mic has identified 25 movements in 2017 that have removed or are pushing to remove specific Confederate monuments. Many of these efforts began or were renewed in the days since the violence in Charlottesville. That includes online petitions, in-person protests, moves by city officials and other efforts to remove memorials. At least eight Confederate monuments have been removed from public land in 2017 alone (a ninth was relocated from public land in one Kentucky city to another).”

Indy Week: The Southern Oral History Program Noticed a Lack of Asian-American Voices in Its Archive. Southern Mix Is the Fix

Indy Week (North Carolina): The Southern Oral History Program Noticed a Lack of Asian-American Voices in Its Archive. Southern Mix Is the Fix. . “A graduate of Duke and UNC, [Anna-Rhesa] Versola founded Southern Mix, which launched in April. A collaboration at UNC between SOHP, the Carolina Asia Center, and UNC’s Alumni Committee for Racial and Ethnic Diversity (of which Versola is a member), the project is collecting oral histories from Asian and Asian-American residents of the Triangle and the larger region, documenting stories about immigration, assimilation, and the blending or preservation of cultures.”

TechCrunch: Equal Justice Initiative, backed by Google.org, launches ‘Lynching in America’

TechCrunch: Equal Justice Initiative, backed by Google.org, launches ‘Lynching in America’. “Thanks in part to funding by Google.org, Equal Justice Initiative has launched an online platform to explore the history of lynching in America. The goal with Lynching in America is to enable people to confront the history of lynching through research, data and the stories of those affected by lynching in America.”

New Web Site Showcases Oral Histories of African-Americans Migrating in the Early 20th Century

A new Web site has oral histories of African-Americans who migrated from the southern US to the northern US in the early 20th century. “The oral histories were part of what was intended to be a larger project for the museum about the transformative effects of the influx of black Southerners on the city [of Philadelphia] in the early 20th century. From 1910 to 1930, their population rose from roughly 85,000 to almost 220,000. The interviews were aired on public radio in the 1980s, but Charles Hardy III, a historian and West Chester University professor, and his fellow researchers ran out of money to bring their vision to fruition.”

Alabama Department of Archives and History Getting Huge Donation of Photojournalism

Wow. The Alabama Department of Archives and History is getting a huge gift of photojournalism. “Alabama Media Group is donating its massive collection of historical photographic negatives chronicling the people, places and events of the 20th century to the Alabama Department of Archives and History, where the images will be preserved, catalogued, digitized and made available online to the public. Containing more than 3 million images from The Birmingham News, The Huntsville Times and Mobile’s Press-Register, the collection is the largest gift of historical content received by the state archives in its 115-year history.”