Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online

Greeneville Sun: Black In Appalachia Website Now Online. “Items on the site are sourced from a mix of local institutions and community members who lent digital copies of resources. Free and downloadable content on local black history is now available on the database compiled by East Tennessee PBS, the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s School of Information Sciences, the Greeneville-Greene County History Museum and the George Clem Multicultural Alliance.”

The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth

New-to-me, from The Wilson Post: Antique Southern furniture sleuth. “The Southern furniture historian said the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts is ‘the largest collection of Southern-made material culture in the world and is concentrated on the American South and includes furniture, paintings, metal works, textiles, pottery and some architecture.’…The museum was established in 1965, and its entire collection may be viewed online.”

AP: Project documents hidden history of LGBTQ life in the South

AP: Project documents hidden history of LGBTQ life in the South. “A new project is documenting a once-hidden history of LGBTQ people in the Deep South, with donors providing troves of information and items on gay life, systemic oppression and activism. Historian and archivist Joshua Burford said the goal of the Invisible Histories Project is to create a uniquely Southern collection that will ‘give Southern history back to queer Southerners.'”

University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community

University of Kentucky: OutSouth Oral History Project Hopes to Tell the Stories of Region’s LGBTQ* Community. “An understanding of the power of oral history to tell personal journeys brought together University of Kentucky’s Office of LGBTQ* Resources and Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History to create OutSouth, a unique repository for preserving the stories of LGBTQ* Southerners and/or individuals who have made significant contributions to LGBTQ* life in the U.S. South.” I think the * at the end is supposed to be a wildcard, to include I, etc.

Charleston City Paper: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative explores Latino communities with Las Voces del Lowcountry

Charleston City Paper: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative explores Latino communities with Las Voces del Lowcountry . “In a tumultuous political landscape that can leave many people of color feeling uneasy or unsafe, one exhibit from the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative (LDHI) seeks to give a voice to the often-overlooked communities of Latinos in the Lowcountry. Las Voces del Lowcountry, a new digital exhibit from Marina López and Kerry Taylor, documents the little-known history of Latinos in the Charleston area through oral interviews conducted between 2012 and 2014, photographs, historic documents, and artistic images.”

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.

Mic: These are the dozens of movements underway to remove Confederate monuments. Help us identify more.. “So far, Mic has identified 25 movements in 2017 that have removed or are pushing to remove specific Confederate monuments. Many of these efforts began or were renewed in the days since the violence in Charlottesville. That includes online petitions, in-person protests, moves by city officials and other efforts to remove memorials. At least eight Confederate monuments have been removed from public land in 2017 alone (a ninth was relocated from public land in one Kentucky city to another).”

Indy Week: The Southern Oral History Program Noticed a Lack of Asian-American Voices in Its Archive. Southern Mix Is the Fix

Indy Week (North Carolina): The Southern Oral History Program Noticed a Lack of Asian-American Voices in Its Archive. Southern Mix Is the Fix. . “A graduate of Duke and UNC, [Anna-Rhesa] Versola founded Southern Mix, which launched in April. A collaboration at UNC between SOHP, the Carolina Asia Center, and UNC’s Alumni Committee for Racial and Ethnic Diversity (of which Versola is a member), the project is collecting oral histories from Asian and Asian-American residents of the Triangle and the larger region, documenting stories about immigration, assimilation, and the blending or preservation of cultures.”