NASA: NASA, University of Texas at Dallas Reveal Apollo 11 Behind-the-Scenes Audio

NASA: NASA, University of Texas at Dallas Reveal Apollo 11 Behind-the-Scenes Audio. “NASA’s Johnson Space Center has the only functional remaining tape recorder capable of playing those approximately 170 remaining tapes. But the time and effort of converting them to current digital formats was daunting, and required the tape deck to be modified from being able to handle two-channels at a time to handle the 30 channels on the historic tapes. But through a collaborative effort with The University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas), the conversion finally has been completed, and the unique perspective of those at the core of supporting humankind’s ‘giant leap’ is available to download and listen to all 19,000 hours of audio recordings.” This is an incredible achievement. I posted in December about what it took behind the scenes to get this digitizing done.

Global News: Quebec scientists preparing medical database for astronauts heading to Mars

Global News: Quebec scientists preparing medical database for astronauts heading to Mars. “A mission to Mars might seem only plausible on the big screen, but plans for the eventual journey are in the works. It might be another decade before human beings touch down on our neighbouring planet, but Canada is investing in research that could get things off the ground.”

Emory University: Preserving the Apollo 15 Flight Data Logs

Emory University: Preserving the Apollo 15 Flight Data Logs. “In 2017, Emory University took the unique opportunity to create a digital learning hub centering around the Apollo Space Program. Emory Library and Information Technology Services borrowed materials from the 1971 Apollo 15 mission (NASA’s fourth manned mission to the moon) to use in creating an interactive website featuring the digital archives from the mission.”

Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space Rocks (New York Times)

New York Times: Asteroids and Adversaries: Challenging What NASA Knows About Space Rocks. “For the last couple of years, Nathan P. Myhrvold, a former chief technologist at Microsoft with a physics doctorate from Princeton, has roiled the small, congenial community of asteroid scientists by saying they know less than they think about these near-Earth objects. He argues that a trove of data from NASA they rely on is flawed and unreliable.”

CBC: Scientists call for protection of geological, historical sites on other planets

CBC: Scientists call for protection of geological, historical sites on other planets. “A Canadian scientist is calling for action to protect significant geological and historical features on the moon, Mars, and other planets. Jack Matthews of Memorial University of Newfoundland says as nations and private companies increasingly explore and develop outer space, there’s a growing threat to extraterrestrial environments.”

The Verge: This nonprofit plans to send millions of Wikipedia pages to the Moon — printed on tiny metal sheets

The Verge: This nonprofit plans to send millions of Wikipedia pages to the Moon — printed on tiny metal sheets. “A nonprofit with grand ambitions of setting up a library on the Moon is planning to send the entire English archive of Wikipedia to the lunar surface sometime within the next couple of years. Don’t worry: there won’t be reams of Wikipedia printouts sitting in the lunar soil. Instead, the organization says it will send up millions of Wikipedia articles in the form of miniaturized prints, etched into tiny sheets of metal that are thinner than the average human hair. The nonprofit claims that with this method, it can send up millions of pages of text in a package that’s about the size of a CD.”