NASA: How to Follow Webb’s Next Steps

NASA: How to Follow Webb’s Next Steps. “Now that NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s first images and data are out, you might be wondering: What comes next? The observatory has a packed schedule of science programs looking at all kinds of cosmic phenomena, like planets, stars, galaxies, black holes, and more. Webb will revolutionize our understanding of the universe — but first, researchers need time to analyze data and make sure that they understand what they’re seeing.”

CNET: NASA’s Webb Space Telescope Stuns With Deepest Infrared Image of the Universe Yet

CNET: NASA’s Webb Space Telescope Stuns With Deepest Infrared Image of the Universe Yet. “Today, as of July 11, 2022, our horizon expands once more. One hundred years of progress – in telescopy, astronomy, astrophysics, engineering, rocket science, mathematics, hell, even streaming online video – has led to NASA unveiling the first image obtained by the James Webb Space Telescope.”

Ars Technica: Citizen scientists help discover more than 1,000 new asteroids

Ars Technica: Citizen scientists help discover more than 1,000 new asteroids. “On International Asteroid Day in 2019, a group of research institutions launched a program that could make a deep impact on our knowledge of the diminutive bodies. Using citizen science to train a machine-learning algorithm, the Hubble Asteroid Hunter project identified more than 1,000 new asteroids; the discoveries could help scientists better understand the ring of heavenly bodies that primarily float between Mars and Jupiter.”

Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars

Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars. “Egypt’s Nilesat 101 launched in 1998, providing multimedia services to over five million homes in the region. Since then, over 40 satellites have taken to the stars, with more than 20 in the last five years. In addition, the first satellites to be entirely developed in Africa were launched by South Africa’s Cape Peninsula University of Technology from Cape Canaveral in January 2022. The African space industry’s immense growth in recent years is a product of innovation in its applications, a need for stronger control of natural resources, and a desire to join the ranks of the preeminent space powers of the 21st century.”

The Guardian: Russia to halt cooperation over International Space Station

The Guardian: Russia to halt cooperation over International Space Station. “Russia says it will end cooperation with western countries over the International Space Station until sanctions are lifted. Russia’s space director said on Saturday that the restoration of normal ties between partners at the ISS and other joint space projects would be possible only once western sanctions against Moscow were lifted.”

Ars Technica: Legally, Russia can’t just take its Space Station and go home

Ars Technica: Legally, Russia can’t just take its Space Station and go home. “The fate of the International Space Station hangs in the balance as tensions between Russia and the West escalate following the country’s invasion of Ukraine. However, given that the conflict is now nearly a month old and the old laboratory is still flying high, it appears that the partnership among Russia, the United States, and 13 other nations will continue to hold. This article will consider the future of the partnership from three different dimensions: technical, legal, and political.”

Library of Congress: New Library of Congress Podcast Explores “Space on the Page”

Library of Congress: New Library of Congress Podcast Explores “Space on the Page”. “In six episodes, hosts David Baron and Lucas Mix will interview authors and scientists who think and write about space exploration and the search for life beyond Earth. Baron and Mix are holders of the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration and Scientific Innovation, as well as researchers and authors on the connection between science and humanity.”

American Astronomical Society: New Tool Launches for Astronomy Software Users

American Astronomical Society: New Tool Launches for Astronomy Software Users. “Astronomers rely on scientific software to analyze data sets and model complex astrophysical objects and phenomena. But as the collection of astronomy-related software grows, it becomes increasingly difficult for scientists to discover relevant packages for data analysis, determine which software version was used in a specific study, or provide credit to the developer of the software used for a scientific discovery. Asclepias combines different platforms to make these tasks possible.”

Globe Newswire: New ISS National Laboratory Tool Expands Visibility of ISS-Related Educational Resources (PRESS RELEASE)

Globe Newswire: New ISS National Laboratory Tool Expands Visibility of ISS-Related Educational Resources (PRESS RELEASE). “The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, Inc. (CASIS), manager of the International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory, today announced the release of a new online tool for educators called Expedition Space Lab. This tool is designed to provide educators with easy access to ISS-related lessons, activities, and other resources to integrate into their curriculum.”

ComputerWeekly: Space junk revealed by University of Texas graph database

ComputerWeekly: Space junk revealed by University of Texas graph database. “Moriba Jah, director of computational astronautical sciences and technologies for the Oden Institute at The University of Texas at Austin, says he would not willingly go into space. ‘No, not me, man.’ The aerospace engineer and self-described ‘space environmentalist’, who started his career as a security specialist for the US Air Force, spent over seven years at Nasa as a spacecraft navigation engineer and over eight at the US Air Force Research Laboratory, including as director for the Advanced Sciences and Technology Research Institute for Astronautics (Astria), knows whereof he speaks. And he is on a mission to make space transparent so it can at once benefit humanity and be cherished.”

University of New Mexico: Jupiter-like planet discovered through TESS and citizen scientist collaboration

University of New Mexico: Jupiter-like planet discovered through TESS and citizen scientist collaboration. “Since 2010, Tom Jacobs, a former U.S. naval officer, has participated in online volunteer projects that allow anyone who is interested — ‘citizen scientists’ — to look through NASA telescope data for signs of planets beyond our solar system. Now, Jacobs has helped discover a giant gaseous planet about 379 light-years from Earth, orbiting a star with the same mass as the Sun.”