NASA: NASA Invites Public to Submit Names to Fly Aboard Next Mars Rover

NASA: NASA Invites Public to Submit Names to Fly Aboard Next Mars Rover. “Although it will be years before the first humans set foot on Mars, NASA is giving the public an opportunity to send their names — stenciled on chips — to the Red Planet with NASA’s Mars 2020 rover, which represents the initial leg of humanity’s first round trip to another planet. The rover is scheduled to launch as early as July 2020, with the spacecraft expected to touch down on Mars in February 2021.”

Universities Space Research Association: The LPI’s Lunar South Pole Atlas — A New Online Reference for Mission Planners

Universities Space Research Association: The LPI’s Lunar South Pole Atlas — A New Online Reference for Mission Planners. “The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), managed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA), has compiled and made available an atlas of the Moon’s south pole… Given NASA’s recent direction to implement Space Policy Directive-1 landing astronauts at the south pole by 2024, the LPI has compiled a series of maps, images, and illustrations designed to provide context and reference for those interested in exploring this area.”

The Verge: How to watch space launches as they happen

The Verge: How to watch space launches as they happen. “Most of us aren’t aware of how many launches take place each year. Besides flights to and from the International Space Station (ISS), there are satellites being sent into orbit, exploratory craft, and new technologies being tested. And because current technologies allow us to view the process to a greater extent than ever before (with more actual footage and less reliance on animation), it is even more interesting to watch than it was a generation ago.”

The Next Web: The SETI screensaver shows us what the internet could’ve been

The Next Web: The SETI screensaver shows us what the internet could’ve been. “SETI@home is a long-term science project currently run by the Berkeley Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley. It began in the early 1960s, when astronomers first began harvesting data from vast radio telescopes — like the one at Green Bank in West Virginia—to look for signs of life beyond Earth. The search and the science is much older than the screen saver, of course, which was released to the public in 1999 and still running today. But the screen saver has been directly helping that search for the past two decades.”

Space Daily: One Comet, 70,000 Images on the Internet

Space Daily: One Comet, 70,000 Images on the Internet. “Between 2014 and 2016, the scientific camera system OSIRIS onboard ESA’s Rosetta spacecraft captured almost 70,000 images of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. They not only document the most extensive and demanding comet mission to date, but also show the duck-shaped body in all its facets.”

The ChronicleHerald: Dal student to launch interactive archive of Chris Hadfield’s photos

The ChronicleHerald: Dal student to launch interactive archive of Chris Hadfield’s photos. “Over the past year, Caitlin Cunningham has looked at every one of the 13,199 photos taken by Chris Hadfield during his stint on the International Space Station in 2012-13. Out of that massive collection, she’s culled about 250 photos for a public interactive digital archive.”

Digital Trove of Apollo Artifacts Debuts on Draper’s New Website: Hack the Moon (PRWeb) (PRESS RELEASE)

PRWeb: Digital Trove of Apollo Artifacts Debuts on Draper’s New Website: Hack the Moon (PRESS RELEASE). “Hack the Moon is free and open to the public. Visitors to the site… will find more than 2,000 images, 200 pieces of original content and 150 videos that tell the story of the Apollo missions. The site features a handy search engine, a mobile-friendly design and special sections on the people, the technology and the missions.”