NASA: How to Follow Webb’s Next Steps

NASA: How to Follow Webb’s Next Steps. “Now that NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s first images and data are out, you might be wondering: What comes next? The observatory has a packed schedule of science programs looking at all kinds of cosmic phenomena, like planets, stars, galaxies, black holes, and more. Webb will revolutionize our understanding of the universe — but first, researchers need time to analyze data and make sure that they understand what they’re seeing.”

Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars

Harvard International Review: The Space Race Expands: Why African Nations Are Shooting for the Stars. “Egypt’s Nilesat 101 launched in 1998, providing multimedia services to over five million homes in the region. Since then, over 40 satellites have taken to the stars, with more than 20 in the last five years. In addition, the first satellites to be entirely developed in Africa were launched by South Africa’s Cape Peninsula University of Technology from Cape Canaveral in January 2022. The African space industry’s immense growth in recent years is a product of innovation in its applications, a need for stronger control of natural resources, and a desire to join the ranks of the preeminent space powers of the 21st century.”

Ars Technica: Legally, Russia can’t just take its Space Station and go home

Ars Technica: Legally, Russia can’t just take its Space Station and go home. “The fate of the International Space Station hangs in the balance as tensions between Russia and the West escalate following the country’s invasion of Ukraine. However, given that the conflict is now nearly a month old and the old laboratory is still flying high, it appears that the partnership among Russia, the United States, and 13 other nations will continue to hold. This article will consider the future of the partnership from three different dimensions: technical, legal, and political.”

Library of Congress: New Library of Congress Podcast Explores “Space on the Page”

Library of Congress: New Library of Congress Podcast Explores “Space on the Page”. “In six episodes, hosts David Baron and Lucas Mix will interview authors and scientists who think and write about space exploration and the search for life beyond Earth. Baron and Mix are holders of the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology, Exploration and Scientific Innovation, as well as researchers and authors on the connection between science and humanity.”

ComputerWeekly: Space junk revealed by University of Texas graph database

ComputerWeekly: Space junk revealed by University of Texas graph database. “Moriba Jah, director of computational astronautical sciences and technologies for the Oden Institute at The University of Texas at Austin, says he would not willingly go into space. ‘No, not me, man.’ The aerospace engineer and self-described ‘space environmentalist’, who started his career as a security specialist for the US Air Force, spent over seven years at Nasa as a spacecraft navigation engineer and over eight at the US Air Force Research Laboratory, including as director for the Advanced Sciences and Technology Research Institute for Astronautics (Astria), knows whereof he speaks. And he is on a mission to make space transparent so it can at once benefit humanity and be cherished.”

IceNews: Website to Finland’s space-related projects recently launched

IceNews: Website to Finland’s space-related projects recently launched. “A new website dedicated to Finland’s space-related projects has recently been launched, the Finnish government has been announced. A collaboration between Finland’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment and Business Finland, the website will feature all of the country’s latest space projects and information about Finland’s space administration and international cooperation.”

Phys .org: Largest virtual universe free for anyone to explore

Phys .org: Largest virtual universe free for anyone to explore. “Forget about online games that promise you a ‘whole world’ to explore. An international team of researchers has generated an entire virtual universe, and made it freely available on the cloud to everyone. Uchuu (meaning ‘outer space’ in Japanese) is the largest and most realistic simulation of the universe to date.”

Ubergizmo: It Looks Like Space Won’t Be Safe From Ads

Ubergizmo: It Looks Like Space Won’t Be Safe From Ads. “Whether you’re driving down the street, reading a newspaper, checking your mail, or browsing the web on your phone, you’re bound to come across an ad or two. However, it seems that even the deep, dark recesses of space won’t be spared by advertisers because that’s what SpaceX and Geometric Energy Corporation are planning to do.” Enjoy your majestic-views-of-space-sans-billboards while they last.

Digital Trends: How to watch Northrop Grumman launch its 16th cargo mission to the ISS this week

Digital Trends: How to watch Northrop Grumman launch its 16th cargo mission to the ISS this week. “This Tuesday, August 10, an uncrewed Cygnus spacecraft will be launched on a resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS), packed with scientific research and supplies for the crew. NASA will be streaming the launch of the craft so you can watch along live at home, and we’ve got all the details.”

Arizona State University: ASU Interplanetary Initiative launches new podcast partnership with Slate

Arizona State University: ASU Interplanetary Initiative launches new podcast partnership with Slate. “‘Mission: Interplanetary’ is a weekly podcast hosted by former NASA astronaut Cady Coleman and scientist and author Andrew Maynard. Each episode features the hosts engaging with experts about the big questions, challenges and mysteries humans face as we venture out to explore the solar system and beyond.”

Syfy Wire: Hold Your Breath And Enter This Hypnotic Map Of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes

Syfy Wire: Hold Your Breath And Enter This Hypnotic Map Of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes. “To aid in identifying the locations of these sinister sites, an international team of scientists led by The Netherland’s Leiden University has recently submitted for publication a comprehensive map pinpointing the locations of 25,000 supermassive black holes to the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.”