CNN: What we can learn from 1918’s deadly second wave

CNN: What we can learn from 1918’s deadly second wave. “The 1918 pandemic transpired in three waves, from the spring of 1918 to the winter of 1919 — ultimately killing 50 million to 100 million people globally. The first wave in the spring of 1918 was relatively mild. A majority of 1918 flu deaths occurred in the fall of 1918 — the second, and worst, wave of the 1918 flu.”

TIME: This Isn’t the First Time America Has Voted During a Pandemic. Here’s How the 1918 Flu Affected That Year’s Election

TIME: This Isn’t the First Time America Has Voted During a Pandemic. Here’s How the 1918 Flu Affected That Year’s Election. “As the midterm elections of 1918 approached, World War I was winding down, but a new strain of the flu was surging. It had been spreading earlier in the year, but is believed to have mutated into a more deadly, more contagious strain that fall. Data analyzed by Tom Ewing, a professor of history at Virginia Tech, reveal that death rates in northeastern cities had spiked in late September and mid-October in 1918, and had sharply declined by Election Day on Nov. 5, while West Coast cities were in the throes of ongoing outbreaks.”

University of Utah: Marriott Library digital exhibit finds echoes of today’s pandemic news in century-old headlines

University of Utah: Marriott Library digital exhibit finds echoes of today’s pandemic news in century-old headlines. “Cancelled events. Shuttered businesses. Debates about face coverings. Although the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in spring 2020 seems like a century ago, it was an actual century ago, in fall 1918, when the Spanish Flu pandemic rolled through most parts of the globe—including Utah. The newspaper headlines of the time show not only the concern and caution in the early stages of the pandemic but also the eventual drop in cases and easing of restrictions—the endgame that, for us, remains in the foggy future. The J. Willard Marriott Library is launching a new digital exhibit to explore the 1918 flu pandemic in Utah through contemporary newspaper articles. The articles show how the issues and divisions that have appeared in the COVID-19 pandemic are, unfortunately, nothing new. ”

New York Times: The Mask Slackers of 1918

New York Times: The Mask Slackers of 1918. “More than a century ago, as the 1918 influenza pandemic raged in the United States, masks of gauze and cheesecloth became the facial front lines in the battle against the virus. But as they have now, the masks also stoked political division. Then, as now, medical authorities urged the wearing of masks to help slow the spread of disease. And then, as now, some people resisted. In 1918 and 1919, as bars, saloons, restaurants, theaters and schools were closed, masks became a scapegoat, a symbol of government overreach, inspiring protests, petitions and defiant bare-face gatherings. All the while, thousands of Americans were dying in a deadly pandemic.”

The Anti-Mask League of 1919: The Cultural Battle of an Enduring Pandemic (Untapped New York)

Untapped New York: The Anti-Mask League of 1919: The Cultural Battle of an Enduring Pandemic. “Before discussing the actions of the anti-mask league, it is critical to remember just how widespread and deadly the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 was. The flu infected 500 million people around the world, 27% of the world’s population, and killed anywhere from 17 million to 50 million people. In New York City, 33,000 residents died — with 65% of the deaths occurring in the second wave. In the first year of the pandemic, the average life expectancy in the United States dropped by a staggering 12 years.”

Jerusalem Post: Meet the 107-year-old woman who survived the coronavirus and Spanish flu

Jerusalem Post: Meet the 107-year-old woman who survived the coronavirus and Spanish flu. “After Marilee Shapiro Asher was admitted to the hospital in mid-April sick with COVID-19, her daughter got a call from the doctor telling her she ought to get down there right away. Her mother likely had only 12 hours to live. ‘Well, he doesn’t know my mother, does he?’ Joan Shapiro said. What the doctor didn’t know was that Asher, a 107-year-old working artist, had already survived one global pandemic. And she was about to survive another.”

Indiana History Blog: Coping with Quarantine in a Pre-Digital Era

Indiana History Blog: Coping with Quarantine in a Pre-Digital Era. Read this and marvel over how much feels familiar. “At the height of World War I, Spanish Influenza ravaged Hoosier servicemen and servicewomen. Fortunately, city and health officials acted quickly in the fall of 1918, resulting in Indianapolis having one of the lowest casualty rates in the country, according to IHB historian Jill Weiss Simins. But how were Hoosiers’ daily lives impacted by the dread malady? As we can now relate, the public was consumed with news reports about the pandemic and resultant quarantine, which we will re-examine here via Newspapers.com and the freely-accessible Hoosier State Chronicles.”

‘Up close and personal’: Mütter Museum maps the spread of Philly’s 1918 flu epidemic (WHYY)

WHYY: ‘Up close and personal’: Mütter Museum maps the spread of Philly’s 1918 flu epidemic. “When the Mütter Museum began looking into the historic epidemic five years ago, it discovered a trove of information in archives around the city, including tens of thousands of death certificates. Part of the project was to create a public online database of all those death certificates and place them on an interactive map. Users can search by name or neighborhood to track how the flu swept the city.”

CNET: CDC 1918 Pandemic Trail game is Oregon Trail with the flu

CNET: CDC 1918 Pandemic Trail game is Oregon Trail with the flu. “You’re a letter carrier in Philadelphia. The year is 1918. Your mission is to stay alive for one day during the most devastating influenza pandemic in history. Choose wisely. Your life depends on it.”

Spanish flu pandemic centenary: new Co-Lab challenge and travelling exhibit (Library and Archives Canada)

Library and Archives Canada: Spanish flu pandemic centenary: new Co-Lab challenge and travelling exhibit. “1918 marks not only the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War, but also the centenary of the Spanish flu pandemic. It is an opportunity to reflect on this grim chapter in our history. Library and Archives Canada has a number of records in its archival collection documenting the political, social, economic, and cultural impact of the flu on the lives of Canadians. Library and Archives Canada is also launching a Co-Lab challenge on this topic. Co-Lab is a crowdsourcing tool that invites the public to contribute transcription, translation, tags and description text. The public contributions then become metadata that improves our search tools and enhances everyone’s experience of the historical record.”

Donegal Now: National Museum of Ireland of Country Life explores devastating Spanish Flu outbreak from 100 years ago

Donegal Now: National Museum of Ireland of Country Life explores devastating Spanish Flu outbreak from 100 years ago. “The public participation element of the programme will allow students, communities and individuals across the island of Ireland to share and archive their Spanish Flu stories… Stories submitted by the public will be linked to an online interactive map of Ireland, which will allow a global audience to view Irish experiences of the Spanish Flu.”