‘You can’t trust the government’: Spanish-speaking social media spreads COVID-19 vaccine disinformation, adds to hesitancy (USA Today)

USA Today: ‘You can’t trust the government’: Spanish-speaking social media spreads COVID-19 vaccine disinformation, adds to hesitancy. “It took Maria Teresa Kumar weeks to find out why her mom wouldn’t take a COVID-19 vaccine and to convince her it is safe. Kumar’s mother, a Colombian American woman who runs a small eldercare facility in Northern California, received a video on WhatsApp featuring a speaker who claimed to be a pharmacist. In Spanish, the speaker warned viewers not to get the shot because it was a ‘new technology never introduced into humans before.’”

DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature (Manila Times)

New-to-me, from Manila Times: DigiPhiLit: A digital project for Philippine literature. “TWO weeks ago, I wrote an article where I highlighted the importance of preserving sources, documents, books and old imprints. The existence of these should not be taken for granted, as in a nation such as the Philippines, which is prone to floods, typhoons, earthquakes and fires, these are exposed to irremediable loss. … Largely unnoticed is a praiseworthy initiative named DigiPhiLit.”

NiemanLab: Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?

NiemanLab: Spanish-language misinformation is flourishing — and often hidden. Is help on the way?. “Another possible contributor to Biden’s lack of success with Hispanic voters may be an onslaught of anti-Biden disinformation that ‘is inundating Spanish-speaking residents of South Florida ahead of Election Day, clogging their WhatsApp chats, Facebook feeds and even radio airwaves at a saturation level that threatens to shape the outcome in the nation’s biggest and most closely contested swing state,’ Sabrina Rodriguez and Marc Caputo reported in Politico this week.”

Cuentas falsas y coordinación con Venezuela: cómo Cuba disemina propaganda en Twitter (El Nuevo Herald)

El Nuevo Herald, and the article is in Spanish, but I’ll provide a machine translation of the salient paragraphs: Cuentas falsas y coordinación con Venezuela: cómo Cuba disemina propaganda en Twitter. “On his Twitter profile, user Kaleb Guevara reproduces a phrase attributed to Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara: ‘the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love.’ The profile photo also reminds of the controversial Argentine figure, a young brunette with a beard, with a cigarette on his lips. But it does not belong to a person called “Kaleb Guevara” but to the Canadian model Nick Bateman. These are just two examples of more than a hundred of what appear to be false profiles that appear on … a new site that identifies Twitter accounts that spread propaganda and disinformation from Cuba.”

Library of Congress: By the People Launches First Wholly Non-English Crowdsourced Transcription Project

Library of Congress: By the People Launches First Wholly Non-English Crowdsourced Transcription Project. “The Library’s crowdsourcing initiative By the People has launched its newest campaign to enlist the public’s help to make digital collection items more searchable and accessible online. Herencia: Centuries of Spanish Legal Documents includes thousands of pages of historical documents in Spanish, Latin and Catalan.”

Poynter: Univision and Poynter’s International Fact-Checking Network join forces to fight misinformation in the U.S.

Poynter: Univision and Poynter’s International Fact-Checking Network join forces to fight misinformation in the U.S. . “The Poynter Institute announces that its International Fact-Checking Network (IFCN) will partner with Univision News to elevate international fact-checks of interest to Spanish language audiences living in the U.S. leading up to the presidential election.”

California Secretary of State: California State Archives Digitizes its Complete, “Diseños Collection” of Hand-Drawn Spanish and Mexican Land Grant Maps

California Secretary of State: California State Archives Digitizes its Complete, “Diseños Collection” of Hand-Drawn Spanish and Mexican Land Grant Maps. “This collection contains images of 493 hand-drawn sketch maps that were originally created from 1827-1846. The hand-drawn sketch maps, or diseños, were used by the Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. governments to demonstrate land grant boundaries for individuals…. The diseños in the State Archives’ collection are complete and accurate copies of the original hand-drawn maps and were created in the 1860s as directed by the California Legislature. This is the first time that the State Archives’ collection has been digitized and available online in full color.”

El Universal: UNAM creates digital collection of Mexican comic books

El Universal: UNAM creates digital collection of Mexican comic books. “Now, you can find more than 1,400 comic books in ‘Pepines,’ a website created by UNAM’s Bibliographical Studies Institute (IIB). The website is a result of 12 years of work and was developed in cooperation with the Innovation and Digital Strategy Coordination of the IIB and the Cataloging Department at Mexico’s National Newspaper Library.” UNAM is Mexico’s National Autonomous University.

WUSF Public Media: Massive Digitization Effort Is The Latest Plot Twist For Cuban Radio Soap Operas

WUSF Public Media: Massive Digitization Effort Is The Latest Plot Twist For Cuban Radio Soap Operas. “Binge-worthy podcasts may be a 21st century phenomenon, but addictive, serialized storytelling is nothing new. From the 1930s through the 1950s, Cuba exported more daytime and nighttime radio serials than any nation in the Spanish-speaking world — even Fidel Castro was a fan. After the Revolution, Cuban emigrés in Miami began making original Spanish-language radio soap operas — better known as radionovelas — that reportedly ran on more than 200 stations worldwide. The Latin American Library at Tulane University is now digitizing a whopping collection of those 1960s-era programs and encouraging academic study of Cold War soaps.”

Genealogy 101: Translation Tools for Your Spanish-Language Research (Genealogy Bank)

Genealogy Bank: Genealogy 101: Translation Tools for Your Spanish-Language Research. “With Cinco de Mayo celebrations this Sunday, some genealogists will be inspired to explore their Hispanic roots this weekend. Researching your Spanish-speaking ancestors in old newspapers and genealogical documents can be intimidating if you don’t read or speak Spanish – but it doesn’t have to be. With a little planning and preparation, you can be ready to tackle that branch of your family tree.”

Poynter: The AP isn’t abandoning its fact-checking partnership with Facebook. It’s expanding it.

Poynter: The AP isn’t abandoning its fact-checking partnership with Facebook. It’s expanding it.. “Two months after it was rumored to be quitting, the Associated Press has expanded its fact-checking partnership with Facebook. In a press release sent to Poynter on Tuesday, the wire service announced that it will start debunking false content in Spanish for its American audience. The outlet will also publish corresponding fact checks in Spanish, making it the first of Facebook’s American partners to do so, according to the release.”

ArchDaily: Download All of COAM Architecture Journal’s Issues From the Last 100 Years for Free

ArchDaily: Download All of COAM Architecture Journal’s Issues From the Last 100 Years for Free. “The College of Architects of Madrid (COAM) has made the initial digitization process of their Architecture Journal public, making one of the most important and influential Spanish architectural publications of the twentieth century available to everyone. COAM is a publication known as a platform for debate, thought, and a vital resource for architects, urban planners, and professionals from other closely related sectors.”

University of North Carolina: Grant to Libraries Will Provide Access to Rare Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan Dramas

University of North Carolina: Grant to Libraries Will Provide Access to Rare Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan Dramas. “The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries has received a grant of $12,100 from the Pine Tree Foundation of New York. The grant will help the Library catalog and digitize a vast collection of rare Spanish, Portuguese and Catalan dramas. The collection is particularly significant because it contains approximately 2,000 ‘comedias sueltas,’ according to Elizabeth Ott, Frank Borden Hanes Curator of Rare Books at the Wilson Special Collections Library. Comedias sueltas are pamphlet-length plays printed between 1674 and 1834, Spain’s golden age of drama.”

Scroll: Cheeky Spanish reporter uses Google Translate to go around French press conference rules

Scroll: Cheeky Spanish reporter uses Google Translate to go around French press conference rules. “In order to avoid questions on rumours about being transferred to another club, French footballer Antoine Griezmann — who played last season for Spanish team Atletico Madrid — refused to answer questions in languages other than French at a press conference. Getting the reporters to ask the questions in French was also an attempt at keeping the conversation focussed on France’s pursuit of the World Cup 2018. A Spanish journalist came up with a smart way to bypass the rule.” SPOILER: it didn’t work. But I give him points for creativity.