USA Today: A year into the pandemic, thousands of students still can’t get reliable WiFi for school. The digital divide remains worse than ever.

USA Today: A year into the pandemic, thousands of students still can’t get reliable WiFi for school. The digital divide remains worse than ever.. “In Los Angeles, special education teacher Jaime Lozano strives to keep the attention of his elementary students during online classes. But no matter the charisma he brings to the screen, it’s no match for glitchy internet connections. Every day, about a third of his students experience an outage that cuts into their learning time, Lozano said. Nearly all of his students are from low-income families, and many can’t afford wired, broadband service.”

Washington Post: D.C. Public Schools cancels plan to bring some students into classrooms Nov. 9

Washington Post: D.C. Public Schools cancels plan to bring some students into classrooms Nov. 9. “The chancellor of D.C.’s public school system announced Monday that he will abandon plans to bring thousands of mostly high-needs elementary students back to classrooms next week after talks with the teachers union collapsed. The reversal came as educators staged a sick-in, forcing the cancellation of online lessons.”

New York Times: As School Returns, Kids With Special Needs Are Left Behind

New York Times: As School Returns, Kids With Special Needs Are Left Behind. “When the coronavirus pandemic first hit, the Education Department stressed that all public schools that would be providing virtual or online education during the pandemic must continue to serve their students with disabilities. But a survey released at the end of May by the advocacy group ParentsTogether, found that 40 percent of kids in special education hadn’t received any support at all, and only 20 percent received all the services they were entitled to. Over a third were doing little to no remote learning, compared with 17 percent of their general education peers.”