Man of Many: New Google Feature Let’s You to Hum a Song You’re Trying to Find

Man of Many: New Google Feature Let’s You to Hum a Song You’re Trying to Find. “Hey, you know that song that goes, ‘duh do do de duh duh’? Nope? Me neither, but I can guarantee the geniuses over Alphabet Inc. might have the answer to the dreaded earworm question because Google is bringing out a brand new feature allowing you to hum or even sing the song you’re trying to find.”

PR Newswire: AcademicInfluence. com Ranks the World’s Most Influential Think Tanks (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: AcademicInfluence. com Ranks the World’s Most Influential Think Tanks (PRESS RELEASE). “… AcademicInfluence.com examines billions of open-source, crowd-edited data points, mapping lines of influence through continuously updated data repositories, including Wikipedia and Crossref. These databases result in analysis that resists being gamed or undermined by single-source editorial bias. AcadmicInfluence.com now opens access to these user-customizable search capabilities so that students, researchers, and inquirers can discover the most influential people and institutions, providing the answers users seek with the objectivity they need.” The people search, to see how famous people rank in influence, is addictive.

PRWeb: ASM International Launches Online Access to World’s Largest Archive of Inorganic Materials Data (PRESS RELEASE)

PRWeb: ASM International Launches Online Access to World’s Largest Archive of Inorganic Materials Data (PRESS RELEASE). “The ASM Materials Platform for Data Science (MPDS) is the world’s largest and most comprehensive repository of inorganic materials data comprised of phase diagrams, crystal structures, and a broad range of properties – physical, mechanical, electrical, optical, magnetic, to name a few. This massive data archive contains more than 1 million experimental and calculated data properties that allow users to dive deep into highly technical materials information that are now easily accessible in one place. In addition, utilizing concise searching technology, MPDS offers effective progressive data discovery of the massive data repository.” Searching appears to be free, while getting detailed search result information appears to be paywalled.

Kim Komando: How to delete yourself from people search sites

Kim Komando: How to delete yourself from people search sites. “People search sites build profiles based on public info scraped from across the internet. These profiles often contain sensitive data like phone numbers and addresses — and scam callers and mail spammers rely on these websites to scout prospects. You might be thinking, ‘Is this legal?’ Data brokers get away with it by giving people a chance to opt-out. Unfortunately, this is usually easier said than done. Prepare to jump through some hoops.”

Georgia Tech: Google Funds Study of How Vulnerable Populations Seek Pandemic Info

Georgia Tech: Google Funds Study of How Vulnerable Populations Seek Pandemic Info. “Georgia Tech will receive $155,000 from Google’s Covid-19 AI for Social Good program to investigate patterns and impact of pandemic information-seeking amongst vulnerable populations, such as older adults, low-income households, and Black and Hispanic adults. These populations have experienced disproportionately high rates of Covid-19-related death, severe sickness, and life disruptions like job loss.”

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Tool to Search Historical Newspaper Images

Library of Congress: Library of Congress Launches New Tool to Search Historical Newspaper Images. “The public can now explore more than 1.5 million historical newspaper images online and free of charge. The latest machine learning experience from Library of Congress Labs, Newspaper Navigator allows users to search visual content in American newspapers dating 1789-1963.”

TechCrunch: Luther. AI is a new AI tool that acts like Google for personal conversations

TechCrunch: Luther.AI is a new AI tool that acts like Google for personal conversations. “When it comes to pop culture, a company executive or history questions, most of us use Google as a memory crutch to recall information we can’t always keep in our heads, but Google can’t help you remember the name of your client’s spouse or the great idea you came up with at a meeting the other day. Enter Luther.AI, which purports to be Google for your memory by capturing and transcribing audio recordings, while using AI to deliver the right information from your virtual memory bank in the moment of another online conversation or via search.” Putting the privacy issues aside, this could make married couple fights positively incendiary.

Bloomberg: Googling for Gut Symptoms Predicts Covid Hot Spots, Study Finds

Bloomberg: Googling for Gut Symptoms Predicts Covid Hot Spots, Study Finds. “Researchers at the top-ranked hospital in Boston compared search interest in loss of taste and appetite, and diarrhea with the reported incidence of Covid-19 in 15 U.S. states from Jan. 20 to April 20. Using Alphabet Inc.’s Google Trends online tool, they found the volume of searches correlated most strongly with cases in New York, New Jersey, California, Massachusetts and Illinois — states with high disease burden — three to four weeks later.”

Search Engine Roundtable: Google Image Search Licensable Badge Now Live With Updated Search Filters

Search Engine Roundtable: Google Image Search Licensable Badge Now Live With Updated Search Filters. “In February, Google added a new licensable badge for image search as a beta while it tested out new structured data markup (with Search Console debugging reports). Well, now after months of testing, this new feature is live and images using this markup can see the licensable badge in the Google Image search results.”

First Draft News: Why we need a Google Trends for Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, TikTok and Reddit

First Draft News: Why we need a Google Trends for Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, TikTok and Reddit. “When it comes to data voids, a distinction is usually drawn between search engines and social media platforms. Whereas the primary interface of search engines is the search bar, the primary interface of social media platforms is the feed: algorithmic encounters with posts based on general interest, not a specific question you’re searching to answer. It’s therefore easy to miss the fact that data voids exist here, too: Even though search isn’t the primary interface, it’s still a major feature. And with billions of users, they may be creating major social vulnerabilities.”

Search for Sound: A New Feature on Internet Archive (Data Horde)

Data Horde: Search for Sound: A New Feature on Internet Archive. “If you’ve been browsing the Internet Archive recently, you might have noticed a new search option called ‘Search radio transcripts’. You can now search through radio broadcasts as if looking up something in a book, it’s pretty neat!”

Gizmodo: Google Is Upgrading Search to Make it Easier to Find Live Sports and TV Shows

Gizmodo: Google Is Upgrading Search to Make it Easier to Find Live Sports and TV Shows. “With a seemingly ever-increasing number of cable and streaming services, simply figuring out where to watch that one live event or show has become its own challenge. So in an effort to help cut down on the noise, Google is upgrading Google Search with some new features to help you find live sports, shows, and movies.”

Reuters: Reuters applies AI technology to 100 years of archive video to enable faster discovery, supported by Google DNI

Reuters: Reuters applies AI technology to 100 years of archive video to enable faster discovery, supported by Google DNI. “Reuters today announced that it has used artificial intelligence (AI) technology to enhance its entire video archive – nearly one million clips dating back to 1896 – supported by the Google Digital News Innovation (DNI) Fund. This new innovation will enable users of Reuters Connect here the most comprehensive digital platform powering the news, to access time-code accurate speech-to-text transcripts of historic archive videos – from the Wright brothers first flight in 1903 to significant moments of World War II—in 11 languages and with unprecedented levels of data.”