Towards Data Science: Analyze and Track Freelance Revenue with Google Calendar and Pandas

Towards Data Science: Analyze and Track Freelance Revenue with Google Calendar and Pandas. “My life and work schedules are run by Google Calendar — this includes all of my private classes, bike/photography tours, academy work, governmental positions, translation gigs, and random freelance jobs. Every ‘unit’ of paid work is in the calendar; I simply needed to figure out a way to directly access the Google Calendar data and rebuild my spreadsheet into a sustainable analyzing machine. In my previous corporate life, I worked exclusively in the world of Pandas Notebooks (Python framework for analyzing data) — therefore it was a natural solution to leverage those tools to access my class schedule from Google Calendar and utilize Pandas to process and analyze the revenue data.”

CBR: Forced Google Sheets Migration Leaves Users Fuming Over Broken Services

CBR: Forced Google Sheets Migration Leaves Users Fuming Over Broken Services. “Developers are up in arms over a forced migration to version four of Google Sheets in March 2020, saying the migration breaks numerous functionalities…. A key feature used by programmers in Google Sheets v3 was the ability to run structured queries on Sheets that returned only matching rows.”

Lifehacker: Preserve Data From Your Apps on a Spreadsheet

Lifehacker: Preserve Data From Your Apps on a Spreadsheet. “My spreadsheet recaptures much of the information collected by my apps—workflow, scheduling, finances, health, and so on—in a document that I both control and update myself. I started developing this spreadsheet in 2013, and am now beginning my sixth year of record-keeping. The current version of the spreadsheet includes separate sheets for my daily schedule and workflow, my Getting Things Done action item list, my finances, my meal planning, and my health.”

CNBC: This developer was surprised that Apple Card didn’t let him download spending data, so he built a fix

CNBC: This developer was surprised that Apple Card didn’t let him download spending data, so he built a fix. “The Apple Card was designed to be loaded into a user’s iPhone, with spending history living inside the Wallet app and transaction data arranged in a colorful interactive interface. But consumers who want to analyze their transactions in Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets for tax or budgeting purposes, a tool that many credit card companies offer, are out of luck.”

ZDNet: Want to analyse your tweets? How to import Twitter JSON data exports into Excel

ZDNet: Want to analyse your tweets? How to import Twitter JSON data exports into Excel. “It used to be easy to analyze your Twitter data: you’d go to your settings and ask for a download, and there among all the files would be a CSV file full of your tweets and the associated metadata. You could then load the CSV into Excel, convert it into a table, and save the resulting workbook. Once it was all in hand you were able to apply filters, searches, and, well, whatever analytical techniques you liked. But things have changed at Twitter, and if you request a download of your data it comes as a set of JSON files.”

Smart Bitches, Trashy Books: Track Your 2020 Reading With This Nifty Spreadsheet!

Smart Bitches, Trashy Books (one of my best choices for finding cheap escape reading, in case you need that right now for whatever reason): Track Your 2020 Reading With This Nifty Spreadsheet!. “I LOVE THIS SPREADSHEET SO MUCH. I’ve used it all year, I love it, and I’m so pleased I’m not alone in enjoying the process of tracking what I read and how I read, too. I’ve made a few updates to the 2020 version, but the great thing about this spreadsheet is that it’s so very easy to customize. Aarya has a version that she’s modified to track an extensive number of book characteristics, for example. So you can make it your own!”

How-To Geek: How to Use Sparklines in Google Sheets

How-To Geek: How to Use Sparklines in Google Sheets. “When you’re working with large amounts of data in a Google Sheets spreadsheet, it isn’t always convenient to drop a chart into the mix. To help you, you can create one-cell charts using the SPARKLINE function instead. A sparkline chart is a very small line chart that allows you to quickly visualize your data. It’s useful if you want to quickly see if share price data in a spreadsheet was going up or down, for instance.”