Global Press Journal: How Sri Lankans Are Preserving History, One Manuscript At a Time

Global Press Journal: How Sri Lankans Are Preserving History, One Manuscript At a Time. “Thousands of one-of-a-kind manuscripts written on palmyrah leaves that were lost during Sri Lanka’s civil war, are being recovered. Now, local people are working to digitize them and preserve the history they contain.” This Web site was a bit of a slow load for me, but I found the article well worth it.

TechCrunch: Facebook adds new limits to address the spread of hate speech in Sri Lanka and Myanmar

TechCrunch: Facebook adds new limits to address the spread of hate speech in Sri Lanka and Myanmar. “As Facebook grapples with the spread of hate speech on its platform, it is introducing changes that limit the spread of messages in two countries where it has come under fire in recent years: Sri Lanka and Myanmar. In a blog post on Thursday evening, Facebook said that it was ‘adding friction’ to message forwarding for Messenger users in Sri Lanka so that people could only share a particular message a certain number of times. The limit is currently set to five people.”

Terrorism 3.0: The rise of social media-based radicalisation (The Sunday Times Sri Lanka)

The Sunday Times Sri Lanka: Terrorism 3.0: The rise of social media-based radicalisation. “Sri Lanka has valuable experience in dealing with traditional terrorism, however Terrorism 3.0 demands long-term goals to be developed and integrated, with enhanced social media sentiment analysis with protocols on how to spot and manage radicalisation in both the online and offline worlds. The fight should be fought on the ideological front, led by moderate leaders, and online sentiments should also be countered with offline actions and discussions.”

New Straits Times Online: Sri Lanka blocks some social media platforms after violent incidents

New Straits Times Online: Sri Lanka blocks some social media platforms after violent incidents. “The Sri Lankan government said on Monday it was temporarily blocking some social media networks and messaging apps, including Facebook and WhatsApp, after violent incidents in the wake of Easter bombings by Islamist militants.”

The Verge: Blocking social networks after terrorist attacks can do more harm than good

The Verge: Blocking social networks after terrorist attacks can do more harm than good. “Imagine for a moment that you run a small country prone to outbreaks of sectarian violence. Terrorist attacks hit a series of churches and hotels in your country on a major religious holiday, prompting fears that violence will spread. Your citizens are using social networks to get in touch with their loved ones and you coordinate disaster response efforts — but they also appear to be using those same networks to plan further violence. It’s your job to bring the situation under control in a way that balance speech rights with safety. Do you leave Facebook online, or do you shut it off?”

Washington Post: Sri Lankan government blocks social media and imposes curfew following deadly blasts

Washington Post: Sri Lankan government blocks social media and imposes curfew following deadly blasts. “The Sri Lankan government blocked access to social media platforms on Sunday in the wake of explosions that killed more than 200 people on the holiest day of the Christian calendar. The blasts, which targeted churches during Easter Sunday services and luxury hotels, also prompted the government to impose an immediate nationwide curfew.”

ReadMe (Sri Lanka): The Population Registry is an ambitious goal of the e-Government

ReadMe (Sri Lanka): The Population Registry is an ambitious goal of the e-Government. “According to Ajith Perera – the recently appointed Minister of Digital Infrastructure and Information Technology, there are ‘ambitious’ plans to bring the Government together under an e-Government. As per the minister, the first step towards this would be to create a population registry of all Sri Lankan citizens. Dubbed the “Mother of all databases”, this would contain all the information about the population of Sri Lanka. The database would be available for all Government ministries to share data. Of course this does present a massive security risk.”