KSDK: St. Louis ‘crushed’ by omicron-fueled COVID surge, task force leaders say

KSDK: St. Louis ‘crushed’ by omicron-fueled COVID surge, task force leaders say. “A surging number of COVID-19 patients combined with fatigued, short-staffed medical teams is leading to a ‘nightmare scenario’ for the St. Louis area. St. Louis Metropolitan Pandemic Task Force leaders said Wednesday the virus is winning, and the fear is that things will get worse before they get better over the next couple weeks.”

NBC News: St. Louis requires masks for everyone amid rising Covid-19 cases

NBC News: St. Louis requires masks for everyone amid rising Covid-19 cases. “The St. Louis area is bringing back a mask mandate for all as the number of Covid-19 cases in Missouri continue to rise amid a more-transmissible variant, officials said. Both the city and county of St. Louis will require masks to be worn by the vaccinated and unvaccinated alike in indoor public places starting Monday, the mayor’s office said.”

Word & Way: In St. Louis, Mapping How Religion Is Lived — in Sanctuaries Holy and Profane

Word & Way: In St. Louis, Mapping How Religion Is Lived — in Sanctuaries Holy and Profane. “[Adam] Park is a fellow with a novel project called Lived Religion in the Digital Age. The SLU project uses photos, interviews and other data to map religious happenings around the city. The idea is to capture the varieties and complexities of religious practices — some in conventional religious spaces such as churches and others at places such as Busch Stadium, a baseball park in St. Louis — to build a better understanding of the way religion is lived.”

St. Louis Libraries Paralyzed by Ransomware

Libraries in St. Louis have been paralyzed by ransomware. “Libraries in St Louis have been bought to a standstill after computers in all the city’s libraries were infected with ransomware, a particularly virulent form of computer virus used to extort money from victims. Hackers are demanding $35,000 (£28,000) to restore the system after the cyberattack, which affected 700 computers across the Missouri city’s 16 public libraries.”