Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records. “In a continued effort to speed up the diagnostic process of severe genetic diseases, Stanford’s Gill Bejerano, PhD, and his colleagues have developed a new algorithm that can quickly locate important disease-related information within a patient’s medical record.”

Stanford University: Piano roll scanner update

Stanford University: Piano roll scanner update. “The Stanford piano roll scanner has progressed from a prototype to a functional, production level machine since the last report in spring of 2017. As reported earlier, the scanner is based on a design by Anthony Robinson, a piano roll expert in England. Swope Design Solutions engineers Robyn Nariyoshi and Brett Swope adapted the Robinson design to scan wider rolls and in color at 300 dpi. Tony Calavano, Stanford Libraries Digitization Lab Manager, identified a gigE, line scanning camera that scans in color to provide the images for the scanner. Ethan Ruffing was the software systems engineer at Active Inspection working with Swope to write the software that allows the camera and scanner hardware to function together.”

Stanford University: Stanford scholars are helping journalists do investigative journalism through data

Stanford University: Stanford scholars are helping journalists do investigative journalism through data. “A team of Stanford University scholars are launching a data-driven initiative to help journalists find stories at a lower cost, to support local newsrooms explore public interest issues and fight against misinformation.”

Slate: Facebook’s Crackdown on Misinformation Might Actually Be Working

Slate: Facebook’s Crackdown on Misinformation Might Actually Be Working. “Facebook’s efforts to reduce misinformation in its news feed since the 2016 election have opened the company to all manner of criticism, including allegations of political bias from both left and right. But a new study from researchers at Stanford University, New York University, and Microsoft Research suggests they might actually be working—at least, to some extent.”

Stanford Libraries: Stanford launches digital library to preserve and broaden access to war crime documents

Stanford Libraries: Stanford launches digital library to preserve and broaden access to war crime documents. “A new online Virtual Tribunals resource developed by Stanford Libraries in collaboration with the WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice has launched, making records from 105 cases investigated by the Special Panel for Serious Crimes (SPSC) in East Timor widely accessible. The SPSC East Timor collection includes final judgments from 55 cases that reached verdict on charges such as murder, rape, and crimes against humanity, all of which have been rendered searchable and assigned a persistent URL in order to remain always accessible despite an ever-changing Web environment.”

New York Times: Facebook’s Security Chief to Depart for Stanford University

New York Times: Facebook’s Security Chief to Depart for Stanford University. “When Facebook revealed on Tuesday that it had identified a political influence campaign ahead of the November midterm elections, the company’s chief security officer, Alex Stamos, was front-and-center in speaking on the issue. But Mr. Stamos will exit the social network this month, just as Facebook steps up its efforts to combat misinformation and foreign interference.” I really hope this gentleman writes a book one day.