Stanford: Tobacco products promoted on Facebook despite policies

Stanford: Tobacco products promoted on Facebook despite policies. “Tobacco products are marketed and sold through unpaid content on Facebook — in some cases, without regard for the age of potential buyers — despite policies from the social media company that restrict or prohibit the promotion of such items, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine have found.”

Stanford: Hidden Medical Text Read for the First Time in a Thousand Years

Stanford: Hidden Medical Text Read for the First Time in a Thousand Years. “An influential physician and a philosopher of early Western medicine, Galen of Pergamon was the doctor of emperors and gladiators. One of his many works, ‘On the Mixtures and Powers of Simple Drugs,’ was an important pharmaceutical text that would help educate fellow Greek-Roman doctors. The text was translated during the 6th century into Syriac, a language that served as a bridge between Greek and Arabic and helped spread Galen’s ideas into the ancient Islamic world. But despite the physician’s fame, the most complete surviving version of the translated manuscript was erased and written over with hymns in the 11th century – a common practice at the time. These written-over documents are known as palimpsests. An international team of researchers is getting a clear look at the hidden text of the Syriac Galen Palimpsest with an X-ray study at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.”

Phys.org: New artificial intelligence index tracks the emerging field

Phys.org: New artificial intelligence index tracks the emerging field. “Since the term “artificial intelligence” (AI) was first used in print in 1956, the one-time science fiction fantasy has progressed to the very real prospect of driverless cars, smartphones that recognize complex spoken commands and computers that see. In an effort to track the progress of this emerging field, a Stanford-led group of leading AI thinkers called the AI100 has launched an index that will provide a comprehensive baseline on the state of artificial intelligence and measure technological progress in the same way the gross domestic product and the S&P 500 index track the U.S. economy and the broader stock market.

Quartz: An innovative introductory economics course at Stanford is now free online

Quartz: An innovative introductory economics course at Stanford is now free online . “Econ 101, the introductory college economics course that is often held in overcrowded lecture halls packed with half-asleep freshmen, is finally getting a facelift. At the front of the class is Raj Chetty, a 38-year-old economist who publishes some of the field’s most intriguing papers year after year. He’s used data to debunk the American Dream, challenge the Ivies as engines of social mobility, and become an authority on inequality. He’s shuttled from top university to top university, scored a MacArthur ‘genius’ grant, and landed on Forbes’ 40 under 40 list.”

Engadget: Google voice recognition could transcribe doctor visits

Engadget: Google voice recognition could transcribe doctor visits. “Doctors work long hours, and a disturbingly large part of that is documenting patient visits — one study indicates that they spend 6 hours of an 11-hour day making sure their records are up to snuff. But how do you streamline that work without hiring an army of note takers? Google Brain and Stanford think voice recognition is the answer. They recently partnered on a study that used automatic speech recognition (similar to what you’d find in Google Assistant or Google Translate) to transcribe both doctors and patients during a session.”

Stanford Medicine: New database expected to strengthen prematurity research

Stanford Medicine: New database expected to strengthen prematurity research. “A new online tool will make it easier for researchers to share many types of data from scientific studies of premature birth. The recently launched March of Dimes Database for Preterm Birth Research brings together information collected at five prematurity research centers funded by the March of Dimes, including Stanford’s.”

Stanford: Stanford team brings medieval texts to a contemporary audience

Stanford: Stanford team brings medieval texts to a contemporary audience. “Curated by Stanford faculty and students, the GMS is an online, interactive collection of medieval texts and their translations. It primarily features shorter texts – never before translated into English – and offers non-experts a gateway into the literature of the Middle Ages.”