Stanford Internet Observatory: Analyzing a Twitter Takedown Originating in Saudia Arabia

Stanford Internet Observatory: Analyzing a Twitter Takedown Originating in Saudia Arabia. “On December 20, 2019 Twitter announced the removal of 88,000 accounts managed by Smaat, a digital marketing company based in Saudi Arabia, and attributed thousands of these accounts to involvement in ‘a significant state-backed information operation’. On December 17 Twitter shared with the Stanford Internet Observatory 32,054,257 tweets from 5,929 randomly sampled accounts. In this report we provide a first analysis of the data.”

Stanford: Search results not biased along party lines, Stanford scholars find

Stanford News: Search results not biased along party lines, Stanford scholars find . “According to newly published research by Stanford scholars, there appears to be no political favoritism for or against either major political party in the algorithm of a popular search engine.”

Nieman Lab: News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast

Nieman Lab: News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast. “‘We observe segregation in political news consumption.’ In this working paper, ‘Partisan Enclaves and Information Bazaars: Mapping Selective Exposure to Online News,’ Stanford researchers examined a ‘data set of web browsing behavior collected during the 2016 U.S. presidential election’ to see how Democrats and Republicans seek out news sources and how they change their news consumption levels in response to different political events. (The data set is from YouGov and was also used in this paper.)”

ScienceBlog: How Fake News Spreads Like A Real Virus

ScienceBlog: How Fake News Spreads Like A Real Virus. “When it comes to real fake news, the kind of disinformation that Russia deployed during the 2016 elections, ‘going viral’ isn’t just a metaphor. Using the tools for modelling the spread of infectious disease, cyber-risk researchers at Stanford Engineering are analyzing the spread of fake news much as if it were a strain of Ebola.”

The Verge: Google employees and critics protest Eric Schmidt’s keynote at Stanford AI conference

The Verge: Google employees and critics protest Eric Schmidt’s keynote at Stanford AI conference. “A Stanford University artificial intelligence conference invited former Google CEO and Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt to give a keynote speech next month. But a group of academics, activists, and current Google employees are urging organizers to reconsider the decision — citing Schmidt’s acceptance of censorship in China and his handling of sexual misconduct allegations at Google, among other controversies.”

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics

Stanford Medical: Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics. “The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics has been chosen by the National Human Genome Research Institute to help lead the development of a coordinating hub for information on the ethical, legal and social implications of genetic research.”

Stanford News: New Stanford research shows difference in language used by Republicans and Democrats

Stanford News: New Stanford research shows difference in language used by Republicans and Democrats. “New Stanford linguistics research has analyzed how Republicans and Democrats use different language when discussing mass shootings on social media and found that Republicans talk more about the shooter and Democrats focus more on the victims.”

Stanford University: Ahead of the 2020 election, Stanford experts urge a concerted, national response to confront foreign interference

Stanford University: Ahead of the 2020 election, Stanford experts urge a concerted, national response to confront foreign interference. “Scholars from Stanford University put forward a comprehensive strategy for what needs to be done to protect the integrity and independence of U.S. elections, with a keen focus on the upcoming presidential campaign in 2020.”

Stanford: Stanford researchers develop artificial intelligence tool to help detect brain aneurysms

Stanford: Stanford researchers develop artificial intelligence tool to help detect brain aneurysms. “Doctors could soon get some help from an artificial intelligence tool when diagnosing brain aneurysms – bulges in blood vessels in the brain that can leak or burst open, potentially leading to stroke, brain damage or death.”

Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries acquires the archive of photojournalist David Bacon

Stanford Libraries: Stanford Libraries acquires the archive of photojournalist David Bacon. “Stanford Libraries has added the work of David Bacon, a Bay Area-based photographer, author, political activist and union organizer, to its photography collection. Bacon has been documenting the lives of farm workers since 1988, and his archive joins a robust and growing collection of photography archives at Stanford.” The collection has not yet been processed, but there are plans to build a digital archive.

Stanford University: Stanford launches new free online course on Beethoven

Stanford University: Stanford launches new free online course on Beethoven. “A new online course explores Ludwig van Beethoven’s music and development as a composer. The class, led by music historian Stephen Hinton, features performances by and discussions with the St. Lawrence String Quartet, Stanford’s ensemble-in-residence.”

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map. “Stanford Libraries has scanned an 1861 map depicting a proposed route for the railroad that eventually connected California with the rest of the country, making the one-of-a-kind map available for online viewing by people around the world. The Central Pacific Railroad Proposed Alignment Map, which is 66 feet long and 2.5 feet wide, comprises four maps on one continuous roll. “

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds. “Through his role as the director of an afterschool youth violence prevention program on Chicago’s South Side, [Forrest] Stuart recruited 60 young men affiliated with five different gang factions for an in-depth study about urban gang violence in the digital age. For two years, he spent 20 to 50 hours a week conducting direct observations with these young men. In addition, he conducted in-depth interviews where he asked participants to review each day’s social media activity with him. During these debriefing sessions, Stuart asked about the origins, intent, meaning and consequences of their aggressive posts so he could better understand how their online activity compared with their offline behavior.”

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview. “Thanks to the Oral History Program and its army of volunteers, Stanford may have brought the art of gathering university oral history to an entirely new level, according to program manager Natalie Marine-Street. The program, which dates to 1978 and is under the auspices of the Stanford Historical Society in partnership with the University Archives, recently celebrated its 500th interview.”

Stanford: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.

Washington Post: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.. “A Stanford University scientist coined the term artificial intelligence. Others at the university created some of the most significant applications of it, such as the first autonomous vehicle. But as Silicon Valley faces a reckoning over how technology is changing society, Stanford wants to be at the forefront of a different type of innovation, one that puts humans and ethics at the center of the booming field of AI.”