Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds. “Through his role as the director of an afterschool youth violence prevention program on Chicago’s South Side, [Forrest] Stuart recruited 60 young men affiliated with five different gang factions for an in-depth study about urban gang violence in the digital age. For two years, he spent 20 to 50 hours a week conducting direct observations with these young men. In addition, he conducted in-depth interviews where he asked participants to review each day’s social media activity with him. During these debriefing sessions, Stuart asked about the origins, intent, meaning and consequences of their aggressive posts so he could better understand how their online activity compared with their offline behavior.”

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview. “Thanks to the Oral History Program and its army of volunteers, Stanford may have brought the art of gathering university oral history to an entirely new level, according to program manager Natalie Marine-Street. The program, which dates to 1978 and is under the auspices of the Stanford Historical Society in partnership with the University Archives, recently celebrated its 500th interview.”

Stanford: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.

Washington Post: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.. “A Stanford University scientist coined the term artificial intelligence. Others at the university created some of the most significant applications of it, such as the first autonomous vehicle. But as Silicon Valley faces a reckoning over how technology is changing society, Stanford wants to be at the forefront of a different type of innovation, one that puts humans and ethics at the center of the booming field of AI.”

“The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience (Stanford Medicine)

Stanford Medicine: “The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience. “Many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more or eat healthier. Not Stanford neurobiology professor Andrew Huberman, PhD. This year, he set out to educate the public about exciting discoveries in neuroscience using Instagram. Huberman’s sights are high: he pledged to post on Instagram one-minute educational videos about neuroscience an average of five times per week for an entire year. I recently spoke with him to see how he’s doing on his resolution.”

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels. “As the use of renewable energy, in this case solar power, continues to rise in the US, there’s also a growing need to better understand not just how much of the country’s energy comes from solar, but also how many solar panels are in use and where they are installed. While the government and utilities can offer estimates on commercial installations, the lack of data on individual residential installations makes these inaccurate. That’s where Stanford University’s DeepSolar Project aims to help.”

Stanford: Stanford Libraries’ transformative gift creates hub highlighting Silicon Valley history

Stanford: Stanford Libraries’ transformative gift creates hub highlighting Silicon Valley history. “Exhibition areas will be located throughout Hohbach Hall and feature such items from the Silicon Valley Archives as design documents and drawings for Douglas Engelbart’s first computer mouse prototype and early audio and video recording technology from the Ampex Corp. collection. The spaces will allow staff to curate and display, in physical and digital forms, documents, photographs, equipment and ephemera from some of Silicon Valley’s largest companies.”

Stanford PACS: Glasnost! Nine Ways Facebook Can Make Itself a Better Forum for Free Speech and Democracy

Stanford PACS: Glasnost! Nine Ways Facebook Can Make Itself a Better Forum for Free Speech and Democracy. “Facebook could make nine ‘incremental’ changes to ensure it becomes a better forum for free speech and democracy, according to a new report by academics at the University of Oxford in the UK and Stanford University in the US. Proposals include: an external appeals body; more user control over News Feeds; and better content review and fact-check mechanisms.” The report is available for free download at this link.

Tech Xplore: Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning

Tech Xplore: Team locates nearly all US solar panels in a billion images with machine learning. “Knowing which Americans have installed solar panels on their roofs and why they did so would be enormously useful for managing the changing U.S. electricity system and to understanding the barriers to greater use of renewable resources. But until now, all that has been available are essentially estimates. To get accurate numbers, Stanford University scientists analyzed more than a billion high-resolution satellite images with a machine learning algorithm and identified nearly every solar power installation in the contiguous 48 states.”

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records

Scope Stanford: New algorithm could accelerate diagnosis of genetic diseases using clinical records. “In a continued effort to speed up the diagnostic process of severe genetic diseases, Stanford’s Gill Bejerano, PhD, and his colleagues have developed a new algorithm that can quickly locate important disease-related information within a patient’s medical record.”

Slate: Facebook’s Crackdown on Misinformation Might Actually Be Working

Slate: Facebook’s Crackdown on Misinformation Might Actually Be Working. “Facebook’s efforts to reduce misinformation in its news feed since the 2016 election have opened the company to all manner of criticism, including allegations of political bias from both left and right. But a new study from researchers at Stanford University, New York University, and Microsoft Research suggests they might actually be working—at least, to some extent.”

Stanford Libraries: Stanford launches digital library to preserve and broaden access to war crime documents

Stanford Libraries: Stanford launches digital library to preserve and broaden access to war crime documents. “A new online Virtual Tribunals resource developed by Stanford Libraries in collaboration with the WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice has launched, making records from 105 cases investigated by the Special Panel for Serious Crimes (SPSC) in East Timor widely accessible. The SPSC East Timor collection includes final judgments from 55 cases that reached verdict on charges such as murder, rape, and crimes against humanity, all of which have been rendered searchable and assigned a persistent URL in order to remain always accessible despite an ever-changing Web environment.”

EurekAlert: Artificial intelligence helps Stanford researchers predict drug combinations’ side effects

EurekAlert: Artificial intelligence helps Stanford researchers predict drug combinations’ side effects . “Last month alone, 23 percent of Americans took two or more prescription drugs, according to one CDC estimate, and 39 percent over age 65 take five or more, a number that’s increased three-fold in the last several decades. And if that isn’t surprising enough, try this one: in many cases, doctors have no idea what side effects might arise from adding another drug to a patient’s personal pharmacy.”