Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map

Stanford News: Stanford scans storied Judah railroad map. “Stanford Libraries has scanned an 1861 map depicting a proposed route for the railroad that eventually connected California with the rest of the country, making the one-of-a-kind map available for online viewing by people around the world. The Central Pacific Railroad Proposed Alignment Map, which is 66 feet long and 2.5 feet wide, comprises four maps on one continuous roll. “

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds

Stanford University: Gang-associated youth avoid violence by acting tough online, Stanford sociologist finds. “Through his role as the director of an afterschool youth violence prevention program on Chicago’s South Side, [Forrest] Stuart recruited 60 young men affiliated with five different gang factions for an in-depth study about urban gang violence in the digital age. For two years, he spent 20 to 50 hours a week conducting direct observations with these young men. In addition, he conducted in-depth interviews where he asked participants to review each day’s social media activity with him. During these debriefing sessions, Stuart asked about the origins, intent, meaning and consequences of their aggressive posts so he could better understand how their online activity compared with their offline behavior.”

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview

Stanford: Stanford’s Oral History Program celebrates its 500th interview. “Thanks to the Oral History Program and its army of volunteers, Stanford may have brought the art of gathering university oral history to an entirely new level, according to program manager Natalie Marine-Street. The program, which dates to 1978 and is under the auspices of the Stanford Historical Society in partnership with the University Archives, recently celebrated its 500th interview.”

Stanford: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.

Washington Post: Stanford helped pioneer artificial intelligence. Now the university wants to put humans at its center.. “A Stanford University scientist coined the term artificial intelligence. Others at the university created some of the most significant applications of it, such as the first autonomous vehicle. But as Silicon Valley faces a reckoning over how technology is changing society, Stanford wants to be at the forefront of a different type of innovation, one that puts humans and ethics at the center of the booming field of AI.”

“The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience (Stanford Medicine)

Stanford Medicine: “The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience. “Many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more or eat healthier. Not Stanford neurobiology professor Andrew Huberman, PhD. This year, he set out to educate the public about exciting discoveries in neuroscience using Instagram. Huberman’s sights are high: he pledged to post on Instagram one-minute educational videos about neuroscience an average of five times per week for an entire year. I recently spoke with him to see how he’s doing on his resolution.”

Stanford Libraries: Historic Standard Hour Radio Broadcasts Now Accessible in Searchworks

Stanford Libraries: Historic Standard Hour Radio Broadcasts Now Accessible in Searchworks. “The Archive of Recorded Sound, in collaboration with the Stanford Media Preservation Lab, recently completed the digitization and cataloging of 684 analog recordings of The Standard Hour radio broadcasts that occurred between 1938 and 1955.”

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels

Slashgear: DeepSolar Project uses machine learning, satellite imagery to calculate US solar panels. “As the use of renewable energy, in this case solar power, continues to rise in the US, there’s also a growing need to better understand not just how much of the country’s energy comes from solar, but also how many solar panels are in use and where they are installed. While the government and utilities can offer estimates on commercial installations, the lack of data on individual residential installations makes these inaccurate. That’s where Stanford University’s DeepSolar Project aims to help.”