Techdirt: More Than Half Of U.S. States Now Pushing Their Own Net Neutrality Rules

Techdirt: More Than Half Of U.S. States Now Pushing Their Own Net Neutrality Rules. “Large ISP lobbyists, the FCC and agency head Ajit Pai are going to be rather busy for the foreseeable future. In the wake of the agency’s extremely unpopular net neutrality repeal, consumer groups note that 26 states (27 including a new effort in Kansas) have now taken action to protect net neutrality themselves — with more efforts on the way. The efforts range from attempts to pass state-level net neutrality rules banning anti-competitive behavior, to executive orders modifying state procurement rules to prohibit ISPs that violate net neutrality from getting state money or securing state contracts.”

The Star: [Indiana] State Police unveil crash prediction map, website

The Star: State Police unveil crash prediction map, website. This is for Indiana. “The interactive map offers predictions for the current three-hour time window, but users can select an different period of time for that current day. The map updates based on the selections, using color shading to indicate the probability of a crash occurring on that date in geographic zones. Blue indicates a low probability, yellow indicates a moderate probability and red indicates a high probability. Locations of relevant past crashes can be seen as red and gray dots as the user zooms in on an area. Red dots represent fatal and EMS-response crashes, while gray dots indicate property-damage crashes.”

TBO: Connecticut may limit access to state’s voter database

TBO: Connecticut may limit access to state’s voter database. “Marketing companies and other private entities would no longer be able to buy Connecticut’s state voter list for about $300 and use the data for solicitations and other purposes under new legislation being considered by state lawmakers this session.”

The Register: Vermont becomes fifth US state to boot up its own net neutrality rules

The Register: Vermont becomes fifth US state to boot up its own net neutrality rules. “State governor Phil Scott signed an executive order Thursday noting that ‘the principles of net neutrality are inherently tied to the provision of reliable, high-quality broadband Internet service for the State,’ and ordering all state agencies to only use ISPs that agree not to block, throttle or prioritize network traffic.”

Journal News: New state website lets citizens see tax dollars at work (West Virginia)

Journal News: New state website lets citizens see tax dollars at work. “West Virginians can now see how their tax dollars are being used, courtesy of a new state website. West Virginia State Auditor John McCuskey held press conferences in Martinsburg on Monday morning and then in Charleston Monday afternoon to unveil the state’s new website…that will provide citizens a graphic snapshot on spending by the various state government departments.”

StateScoop: Maryland ‘OneStop’ portal gathers hundreds of licenses in one location

StateScoop: Maryland ‘OneStop’ portal gathers hundreds of licenses in one location. “With an eye on making state government run more efficiently, the State of Maryland has announced a modern online portal to host information about all license and permits available in the state — more than 300 in total. The portal, now in beta, is called Maryland OneStop and provides a single location for users seeking all types of licenses from across the state government’s many agencies and departments.”

Capital Public Radio: California Lawmaker Hopes Bot Bill Sheds Light On Fake Social Media Accounts

Capital Public Radio: California Lawmaker Hopes Bot Bill Sheds Light On Fake Social Media Accounts. “Social media companies such as Twitter would be required to identify automated accounts, known as bots, under a new bill scheduled to be introduced in the California Legislature this week. Democratic state Sen. Bob Hertzberg of Los Angeles said his bill would not ban bots. Instead, it would shed light on the fake accounts that simulate real people and spread waves of false information across their platforms, the lawmaker said.”