Techdirt: The Entire Broadband Industry Just Sued California For Daring To Protect Net Neutrality

Techdirt: The Entire Broadband Industry Just Sued California For Daring To Protect Net Neutrality. “As expected, the broadband industry filed suit against the state of California today over the state’s shiny new net neutrality law. The lawsuit (pdf), filed in US District Court for the Eastern District of California, echoes many of the same arguments made in the DOJ’s own recent lawsuit against the state.”

Engadget: California bans default passwords on any internet-connected device

Engadget: California bans default passwords on any internet-connected device. “In less than two years, anything that can connect to the internet will come with a unique password — that is, if it’s produced or sold in California. The ‘Information Privacy: Connected Devices’ bill that comes into effect on January 1, 2020, effectively bans pre-installed and hard-coded default passwords. It only took the authorities about two weeks to approve the proposal made by the state senate.”

Washington Post: The Trump administration is suing California to quash its new net neutrality law

Washington Post: The Trump administration is suing California to quash its new net neutrality law. “The Trump administration said Sunday it will sue California in an effort to block what some experts have described as the toughest net neutrality law ever enacted in the United States, setting up a high-stakes legal showdown over the future of the Internet.”

Tenth Amendment Center: New York Bill Would Limit Surveillance Databases, Hinder Federal Spy Programs

Tenth Amendment Center: New York Bill Would Limit Surveillance Databases, Hinder Federal Spy Programs. “A bill introduced in the New York Assembly would prohibit the state from creating any database containing aggregate surveillance data including ALPR, audio, video and facial recognition records. Passage would not only protect privacy in New York; it would also put major roadblocks in front of federal surveillance programs.”

Freedom of the Press Foundation: California transparency legislation could improve access to police records for journalists and the public

Freedom of the Press Foundation: California transparency legislation could improve access to police records for journalists and the public . “In the 1970s, Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law a measure that blocked public access to misconduct documents, and forced defendants to petition a judge to examine these records in private and decide if the information warranted disclosure. In 2006, the California Supreme Court ruled that police misconduct investigations are confidential, a ruling that has kept answers from families of people hurt by police violence, obscured critical information about public officials from journalists, and shielded police from scrutiny. Leticia De La Rosa and Theresa Smith are both advocates for a California bill that could make police investigation and disciplinary records available to the public in particularly egregious instances of misconduct.”