Local News 8: Wyoming launches new drought resources website

Local News 8: Wyoming launches new drought resources website. “The site provides resources and information for specific sectors impacted by drought, including agriculture, tourism, recreation, municipalities and water utilities. It also offers information on federal and state resources and assistance available to those impacted by drought. Information on wildfire conditions and restrictions plus links to United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) drought disaster designations for Wyoming are also available on the website.”

The Columbian: Google to pay Washington $400,000 to settle campaign finance lawsuit

The Columbian: Google to pay Washington $400,000 to settle campaign finance lawsuit. “Google has agreed to pay $400,000 to settle charges that it has not complied with Washington’s strict campaign finance laws, which require businesses to retain records of political ads they sell in the state. It’s the second time in three years that the tech giant has settled a campaign finance lawsuit in Washington. In 2018, Google paid $200,000, plus attorneys’ fees, to settle a similar lawsuit, but admitted no wrongdoing. This time, the company agreed it did not comply with state law, but still disputes whether the law applies the company.”

Carscoops: Auto Group Is Taking Massachusetts To Court Over Voter-Approved ‘Right To Repair’ Law

Carscoops: Auto Group Is Taking Massachusetts To Court Over Voter-Approved ‘Right To Repair’ Law. “The Alliance for Automotive Innovation, a trade group representing General Motors, the former FCA brands, and other automakers, is going to trial to fight a voter-approved measure that would expand access to vehicle data in Massachusetts. The measure is part of a wider law in the state that would seek to help independent shops protect their ability to work with the increasingly complicated automotive technologies that define new vehicles and ultimately continue to repair new vehicles.” This applies to computer electronics, too, which is why I’m including this article.

Cincinnati Enquirer: Ohio Department of Health violated public records law, court finds

Cincinnati Enquirer: Ohio Department of Health violated public records law, court finds. “A special master at the Ohio Court of Claims has sided with The Columbus Dispatch in a 13-month-long records dispute over death certificate data. Special Master Jeff Clark recommended in a June 9 report that the Ohio Department of Health turn over death certificate records contained in its Electronic Death Registration System database in response to the April 20, 2020 request.”

The Progress-Index: Questions about marijuana legalization in Virginia? State’s new cannabis website answers questions, sort of

The Progress-Index: Questions about marijuana legalization in Virginia? State’s new cannabis website answers questions, sort of. “Marijuana legalization in Virginia begins July 1. To help Virginians understand what this means, the state launched a new cannabis website on Thursday with information, updates and answers to questions about the law, tweeted Governor Ralph Northam.”

Pennsylvania Press Room: The State Library Of Pennsylvania Announces New Resource For Pennsylvanians With Disabilities

Pennsylvania Press Room: The State Library Of Pennsylvania Announces New Resource For Pennsylvanians With Disabilities. “Harrisburg, PA – In collaboration with Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Office of Commonwealth Libraries (OCL) today announced the Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped has changed its name to the Library of Accessible Media for Pennsylvanians (LAMP) and launched a new, centralized website available to all Pennsylvanians.”

Editorial: DeSantis battles social-media giants for show (Palm Beach Post)

The Palm Beach Post: Editorial: DeSantis battles social-media giants for show. “As veteran Tallahassee reporter Bill Cotterell notes, Florida has a legal precedent that should have stopped DeSantis, a lawyer, from this cyber-censorship. Almost 50 years ago, this state had a ‘right to reply’ law requiring newspapers to print rebuttal essays from candidates they did not endorse on their editorial pages. The Miami Herald refused to run a rebuttal submitted by a spurned legislative candidate. He sued, and the Supreme Court threw out the 1913 statute. The ruling means the press cannot be forced to publish something, any more than it can be forbidden to publish something.”

Chattanooga Times Free Press: State education department launches free decodable books program to strengthen K-2 reading skills

Chattanooga Times Free Press: State education department launches free decodable books program to strengthen K-2 reading skills. “The Tennessee Department of Education has a new tool in its effort to make students proficient readers by the time they enter third grade. Called ‘decodables,’ the free, at-home reading supplement for students in kindergarten through second grade helps parents work with their youngsters to build reading skills and practice phonics.”

State of New Mexico: Mining and Minerals Division launches Uranium Mines Dashboard

Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department of New Mexico: Mining and Minerals Division launches Uranium Mines Dashboard. This link goes to a PDF file. “The Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department (EMNRD) Mining and Minerals Division (MMD) announces the launch of the New Mexico Uranium Mines Dashboard, intended to provide the public with quick access to data on legacy uranium mines throughout the state. The dashboard compiles data from a variety of sources into one location, making it easier for the public to find information about legacy uranium mining in New Mexico. Built by MMD staff, the database includes mines that had verifiable uranium production, and that have been abandoned, may no longer be maintained, and are inactive.”