Chicago Sun-Times: People in Arizona may soon have to give up their DNA for a statewide database

Chicago Sun-Times: People in Arizona may soon have to give up their DNA for a statewide database. “Arizona could soon be one of the first states to maintain a massive statewide DNA database. And if the proposed legislation passes, many people — from parent school volunteers and teachers to real estate agents and foster parents — will have no choice but to give up their DNA.” And apparently pay 250 smackeroos to do it.

Alabama Secretary of State: Secretary Merrill Announces Availability of Proclamations On Secretary of State Website

Alabama Secretary of State: Secretary Merrill Announces Availability of Proclamations On Secretary of State Website. “Alabama Secretary of State John H. Merrill has worked to digitize proclamations issued by the Office of the Governor of Alabama. Secretary Merrill has made these documents available to the public as a part of his work to make as many pieces of state government transparent and available to the people of Alabama as possible.”

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Former Reed official charged with violating open records law

Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Former Reed official charged with violating open records law. “The press secretary for former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed has been cited for allegedly violating the Georgia Open Records Act in the first-ever criminal complaint filed in connection with the law, the state attorney general’s office announced Monday.”

Daily Leader: New MDOT site shows road and bridge data

Daily Leader: New MDOT site shows road and bridge data. “A new Mississippi Department of Transportation data website can tell county residents something they already know — some state maintained roads are in lousy shape. The new website, MDOT Public Accountability Transportation Hub or PATH, provides an interactive visual analysis of historical and current statewide road and bridge conditions.”

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state

Salt Lake Tribune: Utah leaders hope a new database will help them solve the more than 400 cold cases in the state. “There are more than 400 cold cases throughout Utah — unsolved homicides, reports of missing persons or unidentified bodies. Last year, lawmakers passed a bill that requires all law-enforcement agencies to share information on unsolved missing persons and homicide cases that are more than 3 years old. The goal is to help police share information and make connections between cases that are being investigated by different agencies.” Part of the database will be available to the public.

Railroad Commission of Texas: Railroad Commission Launches Texas’ First Online Searchable Database of Oil & Gas Inspection and Enforcement Data

Railroad Commission of Texas: Railroad Commission Launches Texas’ First Online Searchable Database of Oil & Gas Inspection and Enforcement Data . “Today, the Railroad Commission of Texas launched its RRC Online Inspection Lookup (OIL) tool for searching statewide oil and gas inspection and enforcement information, including notices of violation and intentions to sever leases. For the first time in RRC history, RRC OIL allows anyone, anywhere at any time to search online records of oil and gas well inspections and violations.”

Techdirt: Oregon Lawmaker Wants Public Records Requesters To Tell Gov’t Agencies What They Plan To Do With Released Documents

Techdirt: Oregon Lawmaker Wants Public Records Requesters To Tell Gov’t Agencies What They Plan To Do With Released Documents. “As if government agencies needed any new ways to thwart accountability and transparency. Oregon legislators are introducing a host of alterations to the state’s public records law, but one of those looks like nothing more than an easily-abusable tool to be wielded against public records requesters.”