Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever

Engadget: Thanks to AR, the Statue of Liberty is more accessible than ever. “Rather than build the Statue of Liberty in such a way that its 200,000-lb copper shell stood upright on its own, Gustave Eiffel — the man behind the eponymous tower — designed it around a massive inner framework. You might have already known this, but it’s the kind of detail that doesn’t often spring to mind unless you’re 1) a French/American history buff or 2) someone who has already been inside the thing. Thankfully, to coincide with the opening of the official Statue of Liberty museum this week, there’s a new AR-focused iOS app to give visitors and the far-flung curious an up-close look at France’s majestic gift to the US.”

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London

Arab News: ‘Guardian of Nineveh’: Iraqi statue destroyed by Daesh recreated, showcased in the heart of London. “Daesh militants smashed the original to pieces in 2015, but it has now been recreated by Iraqi-American artist Michael Rakowitz, using recycled cans that contained another treasure from Iraq — date syrup…. The sculpture was chosen from a shortlist of six and is part of a larger project by Rakowitz. The Chicago-based artist is gradually reconstructing the entire database of 7,000 works looted from the National Museum of Iraq in 2003 or destroyed at archaeological sites in the aftermath of the Iraq war.”

Mental Floss: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger

I missed this when it was launched in January but it looks like fun: This Museum Wants to Match You With Your Ancient Statue Doppelgänger. “In addition to supporting the arts and broadening your horizons, a trip to a museum is an opportunity to find your millennia-old look-alike hiding in an exhibit. If you haven’t been lucky enough to make such a discovery on your own, the Musée de la civilisation in Quebec City wants to help you find your match. The museum’s new project, ‘My 2000-Year-Old Double,’ pairs people’s faces with their ancient Greco-Roman or Egyptian sculpture counterparts.”