WIRED: What Music Did You Stream in 2022? Here’s How to Find Your Recaps

WIRED: What Music Did You Stream in 2022? Here’s How to Find Your Recaps. “THE END OF the year traditionally brings with it a flurry of recaps and year-in-reviews from music streaming services. After all, whichever service you use, it’s been carefully logging all your listening habits over the past 12 months. Not only does that mean apps can serve up music you like and might like, they’re also able to tell you, in forensic detail, the tunes that you played over the year. However, each streaming service approaches this end-of-year summary slightly differently.”

TVNewsCheck: WUSF Tampa Launches 24-hour Live Jazz Streaming Service

TVNewsCheck: WUSF Tampa Launches 24-hour Live Jazz Streaming Service. “Vastly expanding its online jazz offerings, WUSF Public Media is unveiling an on-demand jazz music streaming service at Arts Axis Florida with a wide range of recordings, podcasts and concert videos of jazz musicians from Tampa Bay and beyond — available on mobile, desktop, tablet and more, for free, anytime, anywhere.”

Motherboard: Libraries Are Launching Their Own Local Music Streaming Platforms

Motherboard: Libraries Are Launching Their Own Local Music Streaming Platforms. “Over a dozen public libraries in the U.S. and Canada have begun offering their own music streaming services to patrons, with the goal of boosting artists and local music scenes. The services are region-specific, and offer local artists non-exclusive licenses to make their albums available to the community.”

WIRED: Streamers Use Playlists to Control the Music Industry

WIRED: Streamers Use Playlists to Control the Music Industry. “Immediately before the streaming era began, we experienced one of the rare moments in the history of recorded music when power flowed in the direction of artists. Although it was an economically disastrous time for many of them, the democratization brought by digital technologies and the internet also finally forced record labels to reform abuses they’d carried off for decades. Now, however, the recorded music market is again taking on its former hourglass shape, this time with the streaming platforms at the center.”

When Numbers Lie: How to Spot Fake Data in Music and Why It Matters (Complex)

Complex: When Numbers Lie: How to Spot Fake Data in Music and Why It Matters. “Landing a high stream count or massive social media following can be very lucrative for jumpstarting an artist’s career—it can lead directly to label attention, playlist inclusion, press coverage, sync placements, and more. But for the fans, media, and others on the outskirts of the music industry, it can be a challenge to decipher if and how these numbers translate to actual offline interest.”

New York Times: Streaming Saved Music. Artists Hate It.

New York Times: Streaming Saved Music. Artists Hate It.. “My colleague Ben Sisario says that musicians complain about streaming economics that can translate millions of clicks on their songs into pennies for them. Last week, a group of musicians protested outside Spotify offices for changes in how they are paid from streaming. Ben spoke with me about why streaming music has been a letdown for many musicians. The challenges reflect a larger question: What happens when the promise of making a living online from music, writing or building apps doesn’t match the reality?”

Engadget: Streaming music made up 83 percent of the record industry’s revenue in 2020

Engadget: Streaming music made up 83 percent of the record industry’s revenue in 2020. “The coronavirus pandemic may have made it nearly impossible to check out live shows last year, but the music industry still found a way to grow despite all the hardships. According to the Recording Industry Association of America’s annual year-end report, overall recorded music revenue increased by 9.2 percent to $12.2 billion in 2020. That growth was primarily sustained by more money coming from streaming services, with the format generating $10.1 billion in revenue in 2020, up from $8.9 billion in 2019. 2020 marked the fifth consecutive year of growth on that front.”

CNN: Spotify got a big boost this year from an unexpected audience

CNN: Spotify got a big boost this year from an unexpected audience. “One of the undisputed winners of 2020’s work-from-home transition has been Spotify, and it’s not just because of all the new Taylor Swift albums and addictive true-crime podcasts. As the streaming platform looks back on the biggest trends of 2020, one thing is certain: people are playing lots and lots of video games. People streamed music from their gaming consoles 55% more this year compared to last year, Spotify told CNN Business.”

Rolling Stone: Social Media, Not Streaming, Is the Music Industry’s Future

Rolling Stone: Social Media, Not Streaming, Is the Music Industry’s Future. “What’s the fastest-growing profit center in the record business? For years, there’s been one easy answer: streaming. Yet that’s not the case anymore, according to someone in the know — Steve Cooper, the CEO of Warner Music Group. Warner generated over $3.8 billion in recorded music revenues in the last year, with some 63% of that coming from the likes of Spotify, Apple Music and YouTube. But Cooper made an oddly-under-the-radar revelation to analysts when Warner released its latest financials on November 23rd.”

MakeUseOf: Stream Music for Free With These 5 Little-Known Apps

MakeUseOf: Stream Music for Free With These 5 Little-Known Apps. “Right now, the top two free music streaming apps are Spotify and YouTube Music. Each offers a few features for free, with ads, and you can upgrade to a premium plan for more features like offline playback. But you might be surprised to know that you don’t need to pay for anything to get a good music streaming experience.”

The Guardian: Streaming spells the end of the ‘ownership’ era of music, but are we ready to let go?

The Guardian: Streaming spells the end of the ‘ownership’ era of music, but are we ready to let go?. “Apple’s announcement late last year of the end of iTunes as we have known it is a symbolic bookend to the ‘ownership’ era. While streaming services are now the norm, these platforms can feel disconcertingly ephemeral to people who are used to the sense of control and emotional connection that comes with having a physical copy of a song.”

CNET: 7 best scary Halloween music playlists you can stream for free on Spotify

CNET: 7 best scary Halloween music playlists you can stream for free on Spotify. “Like Christmas, Halloween has its own tunes to get you in the spirit of the season. No matter what you’re into — classic movie soundtracks, family-friendly kids songs, chill lo-fi beats or metal — there’s probably a Halloween-themed playlist for it. While there are dozens of playlists, albums and podcasts available across platforms to get you amped up for spooky season, here are seven Spotify playlists to get you started, no matter what mood you’re in or what kind of Halloween party you want to throw.”

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services

Pitchfork: How Artist Imposters and Fake Songs Sneak Onto Streaming Services. “Suspicious bootlegs and fraudulent uploads are nothing new in digital music, but the problem has infiltrated paid streaming services in unexpected and troubling ways. Artists face the possibility of impersonators uploading fake music to their official profiles, stolen music being uploaded under false monikers, and of course, simple human error resulting in botched uploads. Meanwhile, keen fans have figured out where they can find illegally uploaded, purposefully mistitled songs in user playlists.”

BBC: YouTube users can’t stop streaming Latin Pop

BBC: YouTube users can’t stop streaming Latin Pop. “There is no better measure of the world’s listening tastes than YouTube. The site reaches more than 1.9 billion people every month, more than any other music steaming service, and most of those users are listening to Latin Pop. Spanish-language songs make up half of YouTube’s Top 10 for the year so far, led by Daddy Yankee’s Con Calma, with 1.15 billion views.”