New York Times: We Have All Hit a Wall

New York Times: We Have All Hit a Wall. “Call it a late-pandemic crisis of productivity, of will, of enthusiasm, of purpose. Call it a bout of existential work-related ennui provoked partly by the realization that sitting in the same chair in the same room staring at the same computer for 12 straight months (and counting!) has left many of us feeling like burned-out husks, dimwitted approximations of our once-productive selves.”

The Guardian: Work pressure in Covid lockdown was shattering, say teachers

The Guardian: Work pressure in Covid lockdown was shattering, say teachers. “One in four teachers who answered questions about their mental wellbeing told the NASUWT union that they had needed to see a doctor or other medical professional because of the pandemic’s impact, with many undergoing counselling or taking antidepressants. A small number of the 4,700 members who replied said they had self-harmed within the last 12 months as a result of their work. Others reported that their relationships had broken down during the pandemic, and nearly one in three said they had increased their alcohol consumption as a means to cope with their job.”

PsyPost: Study uncovers severe mental health issues among flight attendants at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic

PsyPost: Study uncovers severe mental health issues among flight attendants at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. “Flight attendants who were grounded at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic showed severe symptoms of depression and stress, according to a study published in Frontiers in Psychology. Those who were flying during this time showed severe symptoms of anxiety.”

Mashable: Google and Headspace collaborate on new mindfulness resources for kids

Mashable: Google and Headspace collaborate on new mindfulness resources for kids. “Headspace and Google have teamed up to launch a new resource for families and educators interested in practicing mindfulness with their young children. Headspace Breathers, a weekly video series led by children’s mindfulness expert Samantha Snowden, will lead viewers through ‘practical and creative exercises and tips’ for teaching children and parents how to recognize, communicate, and manage emotions, according to a Tuesday press release. The videos hope to address the added stress of digital learning, social distancing, and increased screen time at home.”

Route Fifty: ‘Why Do I Put My Life on the Line?’ Pandemic Trauma Haunts Health Workers.

Route Fifty: ‘Why Do I Put My Life on the Line?’ Pandemic Trauma Haunts Health Workers.. “Health care workers across the country say they feel underappreciated by their employers and disillusioned with the medical profession, according to ongoing research at the University of Washington in Seattle. More than half of the 300-plus doctors, nurses and other frontline health workers who participated in the study said the pandemic has decreased the likelihood they will remain in their profession.”

CNET: Zoom anxiety is still a major problem, one year into the pandemic

CNET: Zoom anxiety is still a major problem, one year into the pandemic. “One year into the pandemic, video chat platforms have afforded many people the ability to work from home and stay connected to family and friends. We’ve heard a lot about ‘Zoom fatigue’ — the sense of utter exhaustion you feel after a day of staring at your screen for on-camera meetings, worsened when most of your after-work socializing is happening through video, too. But the related concept of ‘Zoom anxiety’ has gotten less attention, though it can be more debilitating for many — and have potential career implications.”

82% of fathers say they could have used more emotional support during pandemic — 68% of mothers say the same: study (CNBC)

CNBC: 82% of fathers say they could have used more emotional support during pandemic — 68% of mothers say the same: study. “Parents could use some extra support during the pandemic, both emotional and logistical. But fathers are significantly more likely to say they need emotional support throughout the pandemic than mothers, according to a new survey from the American Psychological Association.”

Teen Vogue: COVID Anniversary Anxiety Is Real — Here’s How to Cope

Teen Vogue: COVID Anniversary Anxiety Is Real — Here’s How to Cope. “New COVID-19 cases are a fraction of what they were at the January peak, and good news about vaccine efficacy (if not always its accessibility) continues to rise. We’re beginning to consider what stitched-back-together versions of our lives can look like by year’s end — a line of thinking that brings up plenty of anxieties in its own right, but also unmistakably carries with it the promise of relief. This collective hope, arguably our first meaningful dose of it since the pandemic started, is something many of us are, on a rational level, reveling in. And yet, underneath that optimism, unease festers. Why the uptick in anxiety now?”

COVID-19 depression and anxiety: How to take care of your mental health (CNET)

CNET: COVID-19 depression and anxiety: How to take care of your mental health. “The coronavirus pandemic, high rates of unemployment, racial inequality and a divisive, at times hostile, political climate have driven stress way up among Americans. More than 40% of people reported having symptoms of depression and anxiety in January of 2021, compared to just 11% between January and June, 2019. It will take months, perhaps even years, to fully heal from the trauma of 2020, but in the meantime, there are things we can all do to cope.” Big roundup with tons of links.

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Study shows high risk of anxiety, burnout in emergency department health care workers from COVID-19

University of Alabama at Birmingham: Study shows high risk of anxiety, burnout in emergency department health care workers from COVID-19. “Front line health care workers in hospital emergency departments are at increased risk for anxiety, burnout, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder while coping with the COVID-19 pandemic, according to research published in Annals of Emergency Medicine in February. The study, done in 20 emergency departments at hospitals in the United States, found that symptoms of anxiety and burnout were prevalent across the full spectrum of emergency department staff during the pandemic, and as many as one-fifth of health care employees were at risk for PTSD.”

One Year In: Optimism, Advice For Dealing With Stress And Anxiety From The Pandemic (Duke Today)

Duke Today: One Year In: Optimism, Advice For Dealing With Stress And Anxiety From The Pandemic. “The mental health challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have overwhelmed many Americans. The stress and anxiety from sickness, lost employment and a pivot for children and parents to isolated, virtual schooling has had a devastating cumulative effect. As the first anniversary of the pandemic approaches, three Duke experts reflected Wednesday on the impact it has had on various aspects of mental health during University Communications’ 50th virtual briefing for journalists since last March.” Video with an extensive article, but no transcript. Video itself is captioned.

Route Fifty: Four Causes of ‘Zoom Fatigue’ and What You Can Do About It

Route Fifty: Four Causes of ‘Zoom Fatigue’ and What You Can Do About It. “In the first peer-reviewed article that systematically deconstructs Zoom fatigue from a psychological perspective, Jeremy Bailenson, communications professor and founding director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab (VHIL) at Stanford University, took the medium apart and assessed Zoom on its individual technical aspects. The paper appears in Technology, Mind and Behavior.”

University of Colorado Anschutz: Writing Proves a Therapeutic Outlet for Pandemic Stress

University of Colorado Anschutz: Writing Proves a Therapeutic Outlet for Pandemic Stress. “Writing patient notes is just part of the daily routine for doctors, nurses and other providers. It’s a rare occasion, however, when providers are asked to look inward, to search their own feelings and write about them. What happens when they get this encouragement? What kinds of stories emerge, especially during a historic pandemic? Some of the answers can be found in “Narrative Expressive Writing (NEW).” Expressions about this challenging time — waves of sorrow, nightmares, paralyzing guilt, fear of death and other stressful feelings — have poured forth through this flexible, non-intrusive program launched at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.”

Poynter: The stress you feel is normal

Poynter: The stress you feel is normal. “A year into this pandemic, the American Psychological Association checked in to see how you are doing. The answer, you said, is ‘not great.’ A fourth of you said you are feeling a ‘great deal of stress.’ Arthur C. Evans Jr., APA’s chief executive officer said, ‘Without addressing stress as part of a national recovery plan, we will be dealing with the mental health fallout from this pandemic for years to come.’”

Futurity: 1 In 3 Adults Are Anxious Or Depressed Due To Covid-19

Futurity: 1 In 3 Adults Are Anxious Or Depressed Due To Covid-19. “The finding is particularly true for women, younger adults, and those of lower socioeconomic status, the researchers report. COVID-19 continues to pose serious threats to public health worldwide, and interventions such as lockdowns, quarantine, and social distancing are having an adverse impact on mental well-being.”