UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report)

UNESCO: Girls’ performance in mathematics now equal to boys (UNESCO report). “This research confirms that the gender gap in learning has closed even in the poorest countries. And in some countries, the gap is now reversed. For example, by grade 8, the gap is in favour of girls in mathematics by 7 percentage points in Malaysia, by 3 points in Cambodia, by 1.7 points in Congo and by 1.4 points in the Philippines. However, biases and stereotypes are still likely to affect learning outcomes. Even though girls catch up in mathematics in upper primary and secondary education, boys are far more likely to be overrepresented among the highest performers in mathematics in all countries.”

US Department of Defense: Defense Department New Website to Navigate Innovation Opportunities

US Department of Defense: Defense Department New Website to Navigate Innovation Opportunities. “The new website features user-friendly sections, called ‘pathways,’ to quickly provide the most relevant information to the user based on interests. The first is for the academic community. Students and faculty can search available DoD internships, grants, scholarships, and research opportunities. Second, there is a pathway for those in the commercial sector seeking business opportunities with the DoD. Businesses can also learn about ways to seek specific science, technology, prototyping, and experimentation opportunities. The last pathway is designed for military personnel and DoD civilians looking to leverage existing projects, participate in workshops, or collaborate.”

New York Times: What Young New Yorkers Think About the End of the School Mask Mandate

New York Times: What Young New Yorkers Think About the End of the School Mask Mandate. “New York City officials this week eliminated the mask mandate for public school students that had been in place since fall 2020, an aggressive step toward normalcy two years after the coronavirus began battering the city. Some expressed joy at the chance to remove their masks, but not all the students and parents interviewed this week were comfortable with the change. Here’s what some students and parents had to say.”

The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks

The Sunday Times: Students use AI rewrite tool to beat plagiarism checks. “The 18th-century magnum opus by the economist Adam Smith is commonly known as The Wealth of Nations. It was when a student referred in an essay to The Abundance of Countries that his professor smelled a rat. Academics have warned that students are cheating in their essays by using artificially intelligent programs that paraphrase the work of others in a way that cannot be picked up by web tools that check for plagiarism.”

Wired: Inside the Student-Led Covid Walkouts

Wired: Inside the Student-Led Covid Walkouts. “WHEN AYLEEN SERRANO returned to school after the recent winter break, the 15-year-old came back to nearly empty hallways, absent classmates, and what she describes as a ‘lifeless’ atmosphere. As the days passed, fewer of her peers showed up at MetWest High School in Oakland, California; her teachers and classmates were testing positive for Covid-19, or had been exposed and were waiting for tests, or simply feared for their safety. Serrano and her friends decided that if the school wasn’t going to take steps to make them feel safer coming to school, like providing regular tests for all students, they would have to demand those measures themselves. ”

Teen Vogue: Students Walk Out Over Covid in New York, Michigan, Oakland, Boston

Teen Vogue: Students Walk Out Over Covid in New York, Michigan, Oakland, Boston. “Teachers’ unions and local governments are in a tug-of-war over remote learning policies, but little attention has been given to students’ preferences, instead putting youth in the middle. Recent days have seen a resurgence of student organizing in response, specifically to accommodate online learning amidst the omicron variant and spiking COVID spread.”

Poynter: These student journalists were determined to report on COVID-19 — with or without the University of Alabama’s support

Poynter: These student journalists were determined to report on COVID-19 — with or without the University of Alabama’s support. “The Crimson White pitched an ambitious plan to the Poynter College Media Project in the spring of 2021: to create its own COVID-19 dashboard that would reflect a more accurate count of cases and vaccination rates than the University of Alabama was reporting. The university, however, wasn’t jumping to help its student newspaper. So the team pivoted as it submitted open records requests and met with sources, still hoping to get access to what seemed like documents that should be public. They provided regular coverage of the pandemic as students returned to the sprawling Southern campus where rates of vaccinations were low and caseloads high.”

Europeana Pro: Engaging students with audiovisual heritage through Subtitle-a-thons

Europeana Pro: Engaging students with audiovisual heritage through Subtitle-a-thons. “A Subtitle-a-thon is a crowdsourcing initiative which invites the public to create and add subtitles to archival audiovisual clips from European heritage collections available on the Europeana website. We share how this tool can be used by educators to help students engage with and explore audiovisual heritage.”

MakeUseOf: 5 Useful Web Tools Every Student Should Use

MakeUseOf: 5 Useful Web Tools Every Student Should Use. “If you’re a student, there’s no way you can get by on books alone. In-person or online, students always end up with lots of bookmarked websites. Browser apps are great because you can use them anywhere, anytime. After all, why stop at cloud storage for files when you can keep your tools online, too? Here are the five browser-based resources that every student should bookmark.”

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org

Google Blog: Expanding access to computer science education with Code.org. “Last month, 35 classrooms and over 1,000 students signed up to hear from Taylor Roper, a Program Manager on Google’s Responsible AI team…. These virtual chats and field trips are part of Code.org’s new CS Journeys program to help students use their computer science (CS) knowledge and skills beyond the classroom, and discover CS in unexpected places. Students hear directly from professionals who use computer science in unique and creative ways, like modeling the universe, building robots, or — in Taylor’s case — helping to build responsible artificial intelligence tools for products used by millions of people.”

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: From the other side of the world, girl in Kenya learns computer coding at UWM

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: From the other side of the world, girl in Kenya learns computer coding at UWM. “‘I use the computer for school, and I wanted to understand more about how they work,’ said Elsie Maingi, who is 10 years old and lives in Nairobi. However, computer classes in Kenya were geared to high school students and business people and were usually quite expensive, said her mother, Lilian Wangechi. So in the fall of 2020, they turned to Google and found the free Girls Who Code program at UWM. Because of the time difference, Elsie got up at 2 a.m. for every class during that semester and the spring 2021 semester.”