SEO Roundtable: Google AdWords Tests 6 Ads At The Bottom Of Search Results?

I’m getting AltaVista flashbacks! From SEO Roundtable: Google AdWords Tests 6 Ads At The Bottom Of Search Results?. “Over the past couple days, I saw at least three people report that they saw six or more AdWords ads at the bottom of the search results. So as many as 10 ads on a single search results page, up to four above the organic results and 6 below the organic results.” Somebody’s golden goose might choke to death on all that advertising.

Okanagan Edge: We’re not closed, Google

Okanagan Edge: We’re not closed, Google. “A local business owner is sounding a warning after Google continues to mistakenly list her business as closed. Sarah Coffey, who runs Kelowna’s Unless Market, said the mistake appeared on Google searches shortly after she moved the business to a new location in January.”

The Outline: Google’s Featured Snippets are Worse than Fake News

The Outline: Google’s Featured Snippets are Worse than Fake News. “Peter Shulman, an associate history professor at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio, was lecturing on the reemergence of the Ku Klux Klan in the 1920s when a student asked an odd question: Was President Warren Harding a member of the KKK?” Google needs to turn off featured snippets and bring it back when it’s been thoroughly tested. This is disgusting.

CJR: ‘It does not feel like transparency’: Atlanta dumps 1.47 million pages of public records

From Columbia Journalism Review, with a thanks to Wallace S. for the heads-up: ‘It does not feel like transparency’: Atlanta dumps 1.47 million pages of public records. “The scene [in Black Orpheus] draws an eerie portrait of the impossibility of finding information or human value in a bureaucracy bloated with paper. It came to mind recently after a singular decision by the City of Atlanta to release 1.47 million pages of documents to the press and public—on paper. Mayor Kasim Reed announced the release in a February 9 press conference, after weeks of dithering over open records requests by local media regarding a federal investigation into more than $1 million in bribes for city contracts.” Obstructive, mean-spirited, or ignorant of digital redacting techniques?

Livestream of Pregnant Giraffe Pulled off YouTube for Nudity

A livestream of a pregnant giraffe was pulled from YouTube — for nudity. GIRAFFE NUDITY. “[Jordan] Patch claims that the livestream of its pregnant giraffe April, received 20 to 30 million views in just twelve hours. But with this masses came problems. While the zoo sees the video as education, Patch says that some ‘extremists and animal right activists’ reported the livestream as containing sexually explicit or nude content, which triggered YouTube to pull the video.”

More Hackery Hijinx At Yahoo

Yahoo is warning about yet more hackery. “Yahoo is warning users of potentially malicious activity on their accounts between 2015 and 2016, the latest in a string of cybersecurity problems faced by the technology company. The measure comes two months after the company revealed that data from more than 1bn user accounts had been compromised in August 2013, the largest such breach in history.” I hope that Verizon renames this company Yadobe.

Techdirt: Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google’s Fair Use Win On Java APIs

Techdirt:
Oracle Files Its Opening Brief As It Tries (Again) To Overturn Google’s Fair Use Win On Java APIs
. “As was widely expected, back in October, Oracle announced its appeal of Google’s big fair use win, concerning its reuse of certain Java API components in Android. If you’ve been following this (long, long, long) case, you’ll recall that Google has won twice at the district court level. The first time, Judge William Alsup correctly noted that APIs were not subject to copyright, because copyright law clearly states that copyright protection does not apply to “any idea, procedure, process, system, method of operation, concept, principle, or discovery” and an API is a process, system or method of operation. However, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC), who only had jurisdiction over the case because it initially involved a patent issue, seemed unable to understand that an API is different from software and overturned the lower court’s sensible ruling.”