12 News: Arizona offers tool to help residents find treatment for opioid addictions

12 News: Arizona offers tool to help residents find treatment for opioid addictions. “The Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System has a new online map that can help residents find providers for treating addictions to opioids. Users can enter their zip code into the AHCCCS website and find a list of nearby recovery centers that offer in-patient treatment programs or doses of Naloxone, an opioid overdose reversal medication.”

Mental Health for All: New York City Launches First Ever Comprehensive Website and Public Education Campaign To Connect New Yorkers to Mental Health Resources (NYC Health + Hospitals)

NYC Health + Hospitals: Mental Health for All: New York City Launches First Ever Comprehensive Website and Public Education Campaign To Connect New Yorkers to Mental Health Resources. “Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray today unveiled a new comprehensive website and public education campaign to help New Yorkers navigate all the mental health resources available to them and find substance misuse support that meets their needs.”

Washington Post: A Yale doctor is using a video game to fight the opioid crisis

Washington Post: A Yale doctor is using a video game to fight the opioid crisis. “‘PlaySmart’ is one of several games that have been funded over the past decade by the National Institutes of Health and developed by Yale University’s play2PREVENT Lab, which designs games to promote ‘health, wellness, education and social intelligence.’ The game was made in part thanks to a grant from NIH’s Helping to End Addiction Long-term (HEAL) fund, which launched in 2018. The fund aims to help public health officials and health care providers better understand the root causes of the opioid crisis as well as research optimal treatments for opioid addiction and chronic pain.”

News-Medical: New open-source tool designed to predict drug overdose mortality in the U.S.

News-Medical: New open-source tool designed to predict drug overdose mortality in the U.S.. “For two decades, the number of Americans who die each year from drug overdoses has steadily risen, from less than 20,000 in 1999 to more than 80,000 in 2020. By studying patterns of these drug-related fatalities, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego State University (SDSU), and international collaborators have designed and validated a prediction model to signal counties at risk of future overdose death outbreaks. The goal of the open-source tool is to predict and prevent deaths through early deployment of public health resources.”

University of Maine: Governor’s Office of Innovation, UMaine, DHHS launch Maine Drug Data Hub

University of Maine: Governor’s Office of Innovation, UMaine, DHHS launch Maine Drug Data Hub . “Maine Drug Data Hub links to data, reports and other dashboards related to drug problems and related Maine policies. It integrates data from public health, public safety, corrections and the judicial system using the 2021 Maine Opioid Response Strategic Plan as a framework. It also provides special ‘use-case’ portals for ease of use by policymakers, media and clinicians.”

National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: COVID-19 means long stretch of stormy weather for people with alcohol and substance use disorders

National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: COVID-19 means long stretch of stormy weather for people with alcohol and substance use disorders. “The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has created an environment that is particularly problematic for individuals with alcohol and substance use disorders (ASUD), according to physician scientists at the National Institutes of Health. In a commentary now online in the American Journal of Psychiatry, the researchers liken the global coronavirus emergency to a ‘perfect storm,’ with dire consequences for ASUD prevention and treatment that may endure after the pandemic.”

CNET: Google Maps adds tools to find drug addiction recovery resources

CNET: Google Maps adds tools to find drug addiction recovery resources. “Google on Thursday said it’s adding tools to its Maps app to help people recover from drug addiction. The search giant said it launching a new feature for Google Maps that shows people where to go to attend more than 83,000 recovery meetings, including Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous gatherings. The meetings take place in more than 33,000 locations, such as community centers or churches.”

PR Newswire: Pharmacists for Healthier Lives Partner Creates National Database Highlighting Activities Addressing Opioid Crisis (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Pharmacists for Healthier Lives Partner Creates National Database Highlighting Activities Addressing Opioid Crisis (PRESS RELEASE). “Pharmacists for Healthier Lives (PfHL) – a coalition of pharmacy organizations seeking to raise consumer awareness of the full-range of essential healthcare services pharmacists provide each day – announced today the release of a report outlining activities for stemming the opioid crisis from more than 100 pharmacy schools from across the country.”

Quartz: Scientists used Google searches to predict heroin overdoses

Quartz: Scientists used Google searches to predict heroin overdoses. “The United States is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Every day, over 100 people die from opioid overdoses, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But what if we could know about overdoses before they happen? Scientists in California have opened the possibility of having such preemptive knowledge by creating a model that uses Google searches to predict overdoses from heroin.”

New York Times: How Do You Recover After Millions Have Watched You Overdose?

New York Times: How Do You Recover After Millions Have Watched You Overdose?. “The first time Kelmae Hemphill watched herself overdose, she sobbed. There she was in a shaky video filmed by her own heroin dealer, sprawled out on a New Jersey road while a stranger pounded on her chest. ‘Come on, girl,’ someone pleaded. Ms. Hemphill’s 11-year drug addiction, her criminal record, her struggles as a mother — they were now everybody’s business, splashed across the news and social media with a new genre of American horror film: the overdose video.”