KZRG: New app a welcome tool for youth suicide prevention in Kansas

KZRG: New app a welcome tool for youth suicide prevention in Kansas. “The free app, called ‘Kansas – A Friend AsKS,’ was developed in partnership with The Jason Foundation, a national suicide prevention organization, and can be found in both the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store. The app connects youth to tools and resources to help a friend, or themselves, who may be struggling with thoughts of suicide.”

Florida Atlantic University: Digital Self-Harm Linked To Dramatic Rise In Youth Suicide Attempts

Florida Atlantic University: Digital Self-Harm Linked To Dramatic Rise In Youth Suicide Attempts . “Digital self-harm is defined as the online posting, sending or sharing of hurtful content about oneself anonymously. Since research is clear that traditional forms of self-harm (cutting, burning, hitting oneself) is linked to suicidal ideation and attempts, it stands to reason that youth who post cruel, embarrassing or threatening content about themselves (while their peers assume a third-party is the culprit) do so for similar dysphoric or abnormal reasons.”

Ars Technica: Are TikTok algorithms changing how people talk about suicide?

Ars Technica: Are TikTok algorithms changing how people talk about suicide?. “While the word ‘unalive’ first became popular in 2013 (when it was used in an episode of Ultimate Spider-Man), Google searches for the term have spiked dramatically in 2022. From TikTok, ‘unalive’ has spread to Twitter and Reddit; YouTubers also use it so their content isn’t demonetized. Depending on the context, the word can refer to suicide, murder, or death. Though ‘unalive’ is often used comedically on TikTok, people like Williams also use it to talk candidly, forge a community, and signpost resources on the app. The rapid rise of ‘unalive’ therefore raises a worrying question: What happens when we don’t openly say ‘suicide’?”

The Star: Meta, Snap sued over social media ‘addicted’ girl’s suicide

The Star: Meta, Snap sued over social media ‘addicted’ girl’s suicide. “Meta Platforms Inc and Snap Inc are to blame for the suicide of an 11-year-old girl who was addicted to Instagram and Snapchat, the girl’s mother alleged in a lawsuit. The woman claims her daughter Selena Rodriguez struggled for two years with an ‘extreme addiction’ to Meta’s photo-sharing platform and Snap’s messaging app before taking her life last year.”

The Guardian: My wife had long Covid and killed herself. We must help others who are suffering

The Guardian: My wife had long Covid and killed herself. We must help others who are suffering. “Watching long Covid systematically take her apart, organ system by organ system, was the most terrifying deterioration of a human being I have ever witnessed. My wife was an avid 90-minute-a-day walker, ate only organic (and mostly vegan) food, and hadn’t had an alcoholic drink in three and half years. Within six weeks of noticing ‘Covid toes’ and some gastrointestinal issues she could barely walk from excruciating nerve pain in her feet so extreme as to mimic advanced diabetic neuropathy.”

FBI: FBI Launches Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection

FBI: FBI Launches Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection. “The FBI announces the official launch of the Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection (LESDC), which took place on January 1, 2022. The LESDC provides a mechanism for law enforcement agencies to report suicides and attempted suicides of law enforcement personnel, as defined within the LESDC Act, for the purpose of compiling national statistics on these tragedies. As of January 1, 2022, law enforcement agencies can submit data to the LESDC about their current or former officers who die by or attempt suicide on that date and forward.”

New York Times: Another Surge in the Virus Has Colleges Fearing a Mental Health Crisis

New York Times: Another Surge in the Virus Has Colleges Fearing a Mental Health Crisis. “Colleges across the country are facing a mental health crisis, driven in part by the pandemic. After almost two years of remote schooling, restricted gatherings and constant testing, many students are anxious, socially isolated, depressed — and overwhelming mental health centers. At a few institutions, there has been a troubling spate of suicides. Now another swell of Covid cases, driven by the Omicron variant, threatens to make life on campus worse.”

Washington Post: In Japan, back-to-back tragedies renew calls for boosting neglected mental health resources and education

Washington Post: In Japan, back-to-back tragedies renew calls for boosting neglected mental health resources and education. “A pair of high-profile tragedies in Japan over the weekend — a deadly arson attack and the suicide of a pop star — have highlighted growing concerns about the country’s mental health crisis, which experts say has been exacerbated by isolation and anxiety during the pandemic. The back-to-back news stories renewed calls for more resources and education on mental health needs in Japan, which has seen a rise in suicides among youths and women amid the covid crisis.”

Covid impact: NCRB data shows over 29% jump in suicides by businesspersons (India Today)

India Today: Covid impact: NCRB data shows over 29% jump in suicides by businesspersons. “The Covid-19 pandemic caused serious economic strain and the distress faced by business was greater than that faced by the farm sector in 2020, government data showed. The Centre on Tuesday informed Parliament that a total of 11,716 businesspersons died by suicide in 2020. This amounts to a jump of over 29% of the figure reported for the section in 2019 or the pre-Covid times.”

The Conversation: We studied suicide notes to learn about the language of despair – and we’re training AI chatbots to do the same

The Conversation: We studied suicide notes to learn about the language of despair – and we’re training AI chatbots to do the same. “We believe the safest approach to understanding the language patterns of people with suicidal thoughts is to study their messages. The choice and arrangement of their words, the sentiment and the rationale all offer insight into the author’s thoughts. For our recent work we examined more than 100 suicide notes from various texts and identified four relevant language patterns: negative sentiment, constrictive thinking, idioms and logical fallacies.”

CNET: Suicide and self-harm content keeps slipping through on social media

CNET: Suicide and self-harm content keeps slipping through on social media. “More than 700,000 people worldwide die by suicide every year. Globally, suicide was the fourth leading cause of death among 15- to 29-year-olds in 2019, according to the World Health Organization. Exposure to suicide and self-harm content on social media has been linked to harmful mental health effects. A study published in the New Media & Society Journal in 2019 found that people who saw self-harm content on Instagram showed ‘more self-harm and suicidality-related outcomes.’”

Mashable: 8 online experiences linked to suicide in kids and teens

Mashable: 8 online experiences linked to suicide in kids and teens. “When a child or teenager attempts or dies by suicide, it sets off a desperate search to understand why. While that’s the case with many suicide attempts or deaths regardless of the person’s age, a child’s vulnerability and relative innocence creates a particularly heartbreaking contrast with their feelings of hopelessness. A new study aims to better understand one set of risk factors for youth: their online experiences.”

CNET: 13 suicide and crisis intervention hotlines to call or text when you need help

CNET: 13 suicide and crisis intervention hotlines to call or text when you need help. “This guide outlines many different organizations in the US (some service other countries as well) that can provide support, resources and counseling, whether you are in a crisis situation or not. This list is not exhaustive, and it’s worth Googling to find any local services available where you live as well.” Of course if you or someone are in immediate crisis, call 911, do not wait. And also: don’t feel bad if you need to call or text one of these services. These are unprecedented times and most of us need a boost. NO SHAME.

Newswise: Despite concerns, pandemic did not increase suicidal thoughts in veterans

Newswise: Despite concerns, pandemic did not increase suicidal thoughts in veterans. “Many public health experts feared the COVID-19 pandemic would cause an increase in suicidal behavior among U.S. military veterans, a group that already has high rates of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder and which experienced a 30% surge in suicides between 2010 and 2018. New evidence, however, suggests that during the first eight months of the pandemic that did not happen.”