NewsWise: COVID-19 has changed surgery forever

NewsWise: COVID-19 has changed surgery forever. “The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed health care forever, including surgery, just as 9/11 changed airport security and AIDS/HIV altered blood draws and donation. Although this new reality continues to evolve, many changes are likely to remain – possibly permanently – from requirements for patients and visitors to wear face masks at the hospital or ambulatory (outpatient) surgery center to pre-surgery COVID-19 testing, says the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).”

Slashgear: 3D printers may become standard equipment for operating rooms

Slashgear: 3D printers may become standard equipment for operating rooms. “Scientists from UNSW Sydney have developed a new ceramic-based ink that could allow surgeons to 3D print bone parts complete with living cells. The 3D printing bone could be used to repair damaged bone tissue during surgery. The 3D printer uses a special ink made of calcium phosphate, and researchers on the project call the ink ceramic omnidirectional bio printing in cell-suspensions or COBICS.”

Chronicle Live: Operating Theatre Live goes online with free lessons for teens during coronavirus lockdown

Chronicle Live: Operating Theatre Live goes online with free lessons for teens during coronavirus lockdown. “Award-winning show Operating Theatre Live is now running free online lessons for teenagers in lockdown. The show – described as the UK’s only touring surgical experience – has launched an educational channel to help 14 to 19-year-olds with distance learning. The viewers will follow the role of a trauma doctor as body systems are dissected and can ask questions during a live stream through social media.”

Innovators of USC: Doctors have an eye on GIBLIB, the ‘Netflix of medical education’ (USC News)

USC News: Innovators of USC: Doctors have an eye on GIBLIB, the ‘Netflix of medical education’. “Imagine a surgeon being able to watch multiple surgical procedures in 360 virtual reality in order to determine the best way to operate on their current patient. In the past, surgical videos were difficult to locate and often of poor quality, with many being filmed on a cellphone or through a surgical instrument’s video feed. Believing that medical professionals would be interested in studio-quality educational videos, USC alums Brian Conyer and co-founder Jihye Shin created GIBLIB, an online library of curated, on-demand educational videos in 4K or 360 virtual reality. It ain’t cheap, but considering the cost of other educational resources it’s not ridiculous.

Deadline News: Real accounts of Burke and Hare, and other gruesome medical history tales released online for first time

Deadline News: Real accounts of Burke and Hare, and other gruesome medical history tales released online for first time. “The website launched by The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (RCSEd) features a database with some of the most well-known surgeons, such as Elsie Inglis, Dr Robert Knox, Joseph Lister and James Young Simpson. The new website includes historic notebooks available in full, including the memoirs of Thomas Hume, which offer a rare account of an Edinburgh student who was close friends with the assistants of the notorious anatomist Dr Robert Knox.”

PRNewswire: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons announces the launch of its Shoulder and Elbow Registry (PRESS RELEASE)

PRNewswire: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons announces the launch of its Shoulder and Elbow Registry (PRESS RELEASE). “The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) announced the launch of its Shoulder and Elbow Registry (SER) to begin collecting data on total shoulder and elbow procedures in the United States. At launch, the SER will collect total shoulder arthroplasty procedures data. In 2019, the registry also will have the capability to capture rotator cuff repair and total elbow arthroplasty procedures data.”

TIME: This Doctor Used Snapchat’s Spectacles To Record a Surgery

Ya know, I thought with its 10-second clip limit and the way it was being positioned by Snap that the Snapchat Spectacles wouldn’t get much interest for medical and industrial applications (which are still exploring uses for Google Glass.) Boy, was I wrong. “For Dr. Shafi Ahmed, hernia repair surgery is a routine operation. But on Dec. 9 at the London Independent Hospital, something was different. This time, as the British surgeon made an incision in his patient’s abdomen, he was wearing Snapchat’s Spectacles – a pair of sunglasses fitted with a camera that records 10-second clips for later uploading to Snapchat.”

Medical Groups Want to Create Database of 3D Printed Hearts

An alliance of medical groups is hoping to create a database of 3D printed hearts. “With use of 3-D printed heart models expected to grow, Illinois hospital system OSF HealthCare and the federal National Institutes of Health hope to partner with the American Heart Association to improve the quality of printed hearts, with the goal of helping more patients. OSF has 10 hospitals in Illinois, all outside the Chicago area, including OSF Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria and OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center in Rockford. The groups want to create an online database of 3-D printed hearts from patients with congenital heart defects, reviewed by experts in the field. The idea is to help standardize the process of printing hearts.”

Plastic Surgeons Find Google Glass Useful

Google Glass has ended up where I expected: in medical/healthcare and industrial applications. And there’s nothing wrong with that and it’s not a failure. It’s just that if Google had started there it would have saved everyone a lot of handwringing. Anyway, plastic surgeons like Google Glass. “The surgeons who used used Glass for various cosmetic and reconstructive surgery procedures, in general, gave the device high ratings for comfort and overall satisfaction, the study said.”

Using Facebook to Assess Surgical Outcomes

Interesting: a doctor is using Facebook to research surgery outcomes. “UW plastic surgeon Dr. Ahmed Afifi performs a migraine relief surgery that’s fairly new, and wanted to know how it was working for his patients. So, he went to Facebook. He searched some support groups and migraine relief pages, and turned six months of patient posts into data. When he analyzed the results, they surprised him.”

Google Cardboard Helps Surgeon Save Baby Girl

Here’s your happy story for the day: Google Cardboard was used to help save the life of a baby born with a severe heart defect. “‘Dr. Juan-Carlos Muniz who runs our MRI program came to me two weeks before surgery and handed me a piece of cardboard with a smartphone in it,’ [Dr. Redmond] Burke said. ‘I looked inside and just by tilting my head I could see the patient’s heart. I could turn it. I could manipulate it. I could see it as if I were standing in the operating room.’”

Using Google Glass to Unblock a Coronary Artery

I like happy Google Glass stories. Like this one, where Google Glass was used to unblock a coronary artery. “How was this done? Basically through the use of Glass and augmented reality, a group of doctors helped to guide a specialist in opening up a blocked coronary artery in a 49-year old patient. This was possible thanks to three dimensional data sets and CTA which allowed doctors to zoom in and move around the images.”