NYC Mesh: We’ve Created a Public Archive of NYC’s Surveillance Footage

NYC Mesh: We’ve Created a Public Archive of NYC’s Surveillance Footage . “Holding the police accountable requires witnessing, recording and sharing footage of their actions. Inspired by Darnella Frazier, whose recording of George Floyd’s murder sparked a global movement, I am archiving NYC traffic camera footage with help from the NYC Mesh community to make it easier for the public to identify police misconduct.”

New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?

New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?. “Based on the gaping security holes in this home security product, I personally wouldn’t recommend buying a Ring device. Yet millions of the cameras, which range from about $100 to $500, have been sold, and tens of thousands of customers have left glowing reviews for Ring products on Amazon…. I tested a Ring peephole camera, which involved installing the device on my door and creating an account with an email address and a password, to come up with a guide to ensuring your surveillance camera does not turn into a device that surveils you.”

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough. “On the same day that a Mississippi family is suing Amazon -owned smart camera maker Ring for not doing enough to prevent hackers from spying on their kids, the company has rolled out its previously announced ‘control center,’ which it hopes will make you forget about its verifiably ‘awful’ security practices.”

Motherboard: This Secretive Surveillance Company Is Selling Cops Cameras Hidden in Gravestones

Motherboard: This Secretive Surveillance Company Is Selling Cops Cameras Hidden in Gravestones . “Special Services Group, the vendor behind the brochure, does not advertise its products publicly. Its logo is the floating-eye-in-pyramid logo seen on the back of the $1 bill, which conspiracy theorists associate with the Illuminati, and the company’s slogan is ‘Constant Vigilance.’ The company is so secretive that, when asked for comment for this story, it threatened VICE with legal action if we published this article.” Mad-Eye Moody jokes go in that bin over there.

ZDNet: Google kills Xiaomi-Nest integration after user gets images from strangers

ZDNet: Google kills Xiaomi-Nest integration after user gets images from strangers. “We know creeps have hacked smart baby monitors to spy on families, but a bug affecting Xiaomi smart cameras linked to Google accounts creates the reverse problem: one user received unwanted images from strangers’ homes when streaming content from his own camera to a Google Nest Hub.”

Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want. “Since its introduction, Ring has been steadily increasing its market share — both with homeowners and their public servants. At the beginning of August, this partnership included 200 law enforcement agencies. Three months later, that number has increased to 630.”

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018. “Ring, Amazon’s home security camera and surveillance company, has since 2018 rapidly expanded its business by partnering with more than 400 police and sheriff departments nationwide. Amid a growing chorus of privacy complaints and media reports about these partnerships, Ring has repeatedly promised explicitly that police have no way of knowing details of who has the cameras installed and what residents are—or aren’t—willing to share their footage. New reports, however, indicate that police departments may be receiving more data about Ring users in their jurisdictions than previously disclosed.”

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you. “An engineering student in Illinois has put together a handy map to help pinpoint locations where police are tapped into Ring’s surveillance network. Ring, a company best known for smart doorbells and home security cameras, has a massive network of these cameras installed, some of which are being used for surveillance purposes by police in certain cities.”

Ars Technica: Police can get your Ring doorbell footage without a warrant, report says

Ars Technica: Police can get your Ring doorbell footage without a warrant, report says. “Hundreds of police departments around the country have partnerships with Amazon’s home surveillance brand Ring. The relationship benefits both sides: the company provides tech and software to law enforcement, and the cops both provide data to Amazon and also help sell the product to local homeowners. That alone raises troubling issues, but according to a pair of new reports, Ring also gets access to real-time 911 data, and the company helps police work around a need for search warrants when looking for footage.”

Buyer Beware: Used Nest Cams Can Let People Spy on You (Wirecutter)

Wirecutter: Buyer Beware: Used Nest Cams Can Let People Spy on You. “We’ve explained before that when you’re selling or giving away your old smart-home devices, it’s critical to do a factory reset on them first in order to protect your data and privacy. We’ve recently learned, however, that even performing a factory reset may not be enough to protect privacy for owners of the popular Nest Cam Indoor. And in a twist, this time the risk is on the side of the person receiving the device, not the person disposing of it.”

Ubergizmo: This Colorful Patch Stops AI Cameras From Tracking You

Ubergizmo: This Colorful Patch Stops AI Cameras From Tracking You. “Thanks to the efforts of a group of engineers from the University of KU Leuven in Belgium, they have somehow managed to beat AI-powered cameras from identifying and tracking you. It also appears that the method involved isn’t particularly sophisticated and all it involves is a colorful patch that you can print out at home.”

New York Times: We Built an ‘Unbelievable’ (but Legal) Facial Recognition Machine

New York Times: We Built an ‘Unbelievable’ (but Legal) Facial Recognition Machine. “Most people pass through some type of public space in their daily routine — sidewalks, roads, train stations. Thousands walk through Bryant Park every day. But we generally think that a detailed log of our location, and a list of the people we’re with, is private. Facial recognition, applied to the web of cameras that already exists in most cities, is a threat to that privacy.”

The Intercept: For Owners Of Amazon’s Ring Security Cameras, Strangers May Have Been Watching Too

The Intercept: For Owners Of Amazon’s Ring Security Cameras, Strangers May Have Been Watching Too . “THE ‘SMART HOME’ of the 21st century isn’t just supposed to be a monument to convenience, we’re told, but also to protection, a Tony Stark-like bubble of vigilant algorithms and internet-connected sensors working ceaselessly to watch over us. But for some who’ve welcomed in Amazon’s Ring security cameras, there have been more than just algorithms watching through the lens, according to sources alarmed by Ring’s dismal privacy practices.”

TechCrunch: Security flaws let anyone snoop on Guardzilla smart camera video recordings

TechCrunch: Security flaws let anyone snoop on Guardzilla smart camera video recordings . “A popular smart security system maker has ignored warnings from security researchers that its flagship device has several serious vulnerabilities, including allowing anyone access to the company’s central store of customer-uploaded video recordings.”