Washington Post: How America’s surveillance networks helped the FBI catch the Capitol mob

Washington Post: How America’s surveillance networks helped the FBI catch the Capitol mob. “Debra Maimone pulled down her American flag mask for a moment on Jan. 6 and gazed at the unruly mob of supporters of President Donald Trump overrunning the U.S. Capitol. ‘Put your mask on,’ warned her fiance, as the couple stood beneath an unblinking array of surveillance cameras. ‘I don’t want them to see you.’ It was too late.”

The Register: Smart doorbells on business premises make your property more attractive to burglars, warns researcher

The Register: Smart doorbells on business premises make your property more attractive to burglars, warns researcher. “Installing a smart doorbell on your abode could actually increase your home’s attractiveness to burglars, researchers from Britain’s Cranfield University have said. The defence ‘n’ security-focused institution’s findings fly in the face of heavy marketing from companies such as Amazon’s Ring, whose video-enabled doorbell product has been touted around the world as a security-enhancing gadget.”

The Verge: Security startup Verkada hack exposes 150,000 security cameras in Tesla factories, jails, and more

The Verge: Security startup Verkada hack exposes 150,000 security cameras in Tesla factories, jails, and more. “Verkada, a Silicon Valley security startup that provides cloud-based security camera services, has suffered a major security breach. Hackers gained access to over 150,000 of the company’s cameras, including cameras in Tesla factories and warehouses, Cloudflare offices, Equinox gyms, hospitals, jails, schools, police stations, and Verkada’s own offices, Bloomberg reports.”

Washington Post: Home-security cameras have become a fruitful resource for law enforcement — and a fatal risk

Washington Post: Home-security cameras have become a fruitful resource for law enforcement — and a fatal risk. “Police forces across the U.S. made more than 20,000 requests last year for footage captured by Ring’s ‘video doorbells’ and other home-security cameras, underscoring how the rapid growth of inexpensive home surveillance technology has given American law enforcement an unprecedented ability to monitor neighborhood life.”

BuzzFeed News: A Home Security Tech Hacked Into Cameras To Watch People Undressing And Having Sex, Prosecutors Say

BuzzFeed News: A Home Security Tech Hacked Into Cameras To Watch People Undressing And Having Sex, Prosecutors Say. “A home security technician admitted Thursday that he secretly accessed the cameras of more than 200 customers, particularly attractive women, to spy on while they undressed, slept, or had sex, federal prosecutors said. Telesforo Aviles, a 35-year-old former employee for the security company ADT, admitted he secretly accessed the customers’ accounts more than 9,600 times over more than four years, according to a guilty plea submitted in court.”

Jackson Free Press: Mississippi Program to Use Door Cameras to Fight Crime

Jackson Free Press: Mississippi Program to Use Door Cameras to Fight Crime. “Mississippi’s capital city could begin using residents’ door security cameras in its effort to fight rising crime. Recently, Jackson began a pilot program with two technology corporations to provide a platform for the police department to access private surveillance via Ring cameras. Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba said if home and business owners allow, they could give the city permission to access those cameras through the platform, and the city could use the data collected to track criminal activity, WLBT-TV reported.”

Mashable: Amazon quietly announces major expansion to neighborhood surveillance networks

Mashable: Amazon quietly announces major expansion to neighborhood surveillance networks. “Amazon, the powerhouse behind the Ring security camera network, is coming for your community. On [September 21], the surveillance juggernaut announced a major expansion to its smart neighborhood effort dubbed Sidewalk. Notably, Amazon failed to highlight one crucial detailed specified in the accompanying white paper: If you already own one of 20 existing Amazon products, you’ll automatically be participating unless you actively opt out.”

NYC Mesh: We’ve Created a Public Archive of NYC’s Surveillance Footage

NYC Mesh: We’ve Created a Public Archive of NYC’s Surveillance Footage . “Holding the police accountable requires witnessing, recording and sharing footage of their actions. Inspired by Darnella Frazier, whose recording of George Floyd’s murder sparked a global movement, I am archiving NYC traffic camera footage with help from the NYC Mesh community to make it easier for the public to identify police misconduct.”

New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?

New York Times: Your Doorbell Camera Spied on You. Now What?. “Based on the gaping security holes in this home security product, I personally wouldn’t recommend buying a Ring device. Yet millions of the cameras, which range from about $100 to $500, have been sold, and tens of thousands of customers have left glowing reviews for Ring products on Amazon…. I tested a Ring peephole camera, which involved installing the device on my door and creating an account with an email address and a password, to come up with a guide to ensuring your surveillance camera does not turn into a device that surveils you.”

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough

TechCrunch: Ring’s new security ‘control center’ isn’t nearly enough. “On the same day that a Mississippi family is suing Amazon -owned smart camera maker Ring for not doing enough to prevent hackers from spying on their kids, the company has rolled out its previously announced ‘control center,’ which it hopes will make you forget about its verifiably ‘awful’ security practices.”

Motherboard: This Secretive Surveillance Company Is Selling Cops Cameras Hidden in Gravestones

Motherboard: This Secretive Surveillance Company Is Selling Cops Cameras Hidden in Gravestones . “Special Services Group, the vendor behind the brochure, does not advertise its products publicly. Its logo is the floating-eye-in-pyramid logo seen on the back of the $1 bill, which conspiracy theorists associate with the Illuminati, and the company’s slogan is ‘Constant Vigilance.’ The company is so secretive that, when asked for comment for this story, it threatened VICE with legal action if we published this article.” Mad-Eye Moody jokes go in that bin over there.

Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Amazon: Cops Can Get Recordings From Ring, Keep Them Forever, And Share Them With Whoever They Want. “Since its introduction, Ring has been steadily increasing its market share — both with homeowners and their public servants. At the beginning of August, this partnership included 200 law enforcement agencies. Three months later, that number has increased to 630.”

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018

Ars Technica: Ring reportedly shared video sharing data, detailed maps with police in 2018. “Ring, Amazon’s home security camera and surveillance company, has since 2018 rapidly expanded its business by partnering with more than 400 police and sheriff departments nationwide. Amid a growing chorus of privacy complaints and media reports about these partnerships, Ring has repeatedly promised explicitly that police have no way of knowing details of who has the cameras installed and what residents are—or aren’t—willing to share their footage. New reports, however, indicate that police departments may be receiving more data about Ring users in their jurisdictions than previously disclosed.”

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you

The Next Web: Map reveals which cities use Ring’s surveillance network to spy on you. “An engineering student in Illinois has put together a handy map to help pinpoint locations where police are tapped into Ring’s surveillance network. Ring, a company best known for smart doorbells and home security cameras, has a massive network of these cameras installed, some of which are being used for surveillance purposes by police in certain cities.”