The New York Times: Using Old Cellphones to Listen for Illegal Loggers

The New York Times: Using Old Cellphones to Listen for Illegal Loggers. ” This village in West Sumatra, a lush province of volcanoes and hilly rainforests, had a problem with illegal loggers…. So, residents asked a local environmental group for camera traps or some other equipment that might help. In July, they got more than they expected: a treetop surveillance system that uses recycled cellphones and artificial intelligence software to listen for rogue loggers and catch them in the act.”

Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide

Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide. “Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level. Wild bees buzz through farms, pollinating vegetables as they go. Nearby, wetlands might remove chemicals from the farm’s runoff, protecting a community drinking water source. In communities all around the world, nature’s contributions are constantly flowing to people. Scientists have mapped these contributions at local levels for years, but a new Stanford-led study puts these local analyses on an interactive global map that emphasizes nature’s declining ability to protect people from water pollution, coastal storms and under-pollinated crops.”

Washington Square News: NYU, Mayor’s Office Develop Interactive Efficiency-Tracking Map of City Buildings

Washington Square News: NYU, Mayor’s Office Develop Interactive Efficiency-Tracking Map of City Buildings. “An NYU team and the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability consolidated six years of data to make an interactive map that color codes buildings based on energy efficiency. NYU’s Marron Institute of Urban Management and the NYU Urban Intelligence Lab — led by a professor at the institute with the goal of using data to address city problems — helped create the tool. When they go on the site, a user is allowed to enter any address within the city and see a 3D model of the building and area, each building color-coded based on how energy efficient it is.”

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends

Sea Around Us: How Sustainable Is Tuna? New Global Catch Database Exposes Dangerous Fishing Trends. “Appearing in everything from sushi rolls to sandwiches, tuna are among the world’s favourite fish. But are our current tuna fishing habits sustainable? Probably not, according to a new global database of tuna catches created by researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Western Australia.”

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration

Natural History of Ecological Restoration: Desert Trees of the World – A new database for ecological restoration. “Desert Trees of the World represents a multi-purpose, participatory database in which we have gathered a vast array of information about dryland trees, where and how they live, the communities they are part of, the many ways in which they are used by people, and some elements about their successful cultivation.”

University of Southampton: Student launches search engine for sustainable fashion in the UK

University of Southampton: Student launches search engine for sustainable fashion in the UK. “Project Cece uses in-house developed web tools to automatically ‘collect’ products from over 100 sustainable webshops on one website, providing a complete overview of all available ethical clothing. With insightful icons, to-the-point descriptions and filters, Project CeCe helps consumers find clothing that fits their style, budget, and values, say its founders.”

CNET: Google pledges to include recycled materials in all its consumer devices by 2022

CNET: Google pledges to include recycled materials in all its consumer devices by 2022. “Google says it’s trying to reduce its carbon footprint. The search giant on Monday outlined its sustainability efforts for its ‘Made By Google’ line of consumer hardware, which includes Pixel smartphones, Google Home smart speakers and Nest thermostats.”