Australian Financial Review: Meet the woman who saved the Sydney Harbour Bridge

Australian Financial Review: Meet the woman who saved the Sydney Harbour Bridge. “Kathleen Butler is barely remembered today. But in the 1920s, she became known as ‘The Bridge Girl’ – she even went overseas with engineers from [engineer John] Bradfield’s team to review tenders for the construction process…. Now her contribution to the successful construction of ‘The Coathanger’ is being revived, thanks in part to the University of Sydney’s decision to digitise 596 photos of the bridge’s construction from Bradfield’s three personal albums, which he had entrusted to his loyal companion and protégé in 1927.”

Washington Post: One of the world’s toughest coronavirus quarantine regimes is finally ending

Washington Post: One of the world’s toughest coronavirus quarantine regimes is finally ending. “Since early in the pandemic, Australia has imposed some of the world’s strictest quarantine requirements, effectively walling itself off and stranding thousands of its citizens overseas in a bid to keep the coronavirus out. Now, after a surge in vaccinations, those walls are starting to tumble.”

Covid: Sydney reveals plan to end months-long lockdown (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Sydney reveals plan to end months-long lockdown. “Australia’s biggest city Sydney is likely to ease out of lockdown from next month, provided a vaccination threshold is reached. The New South Wales (NSW) state capital has been in lockdown since July due to a Delta variant outbreak. The state government released its much-anticipated ‘roadmap to freedom’ on Thursday.”

ZDNet: New Google Maps tools make navigating Sydney’s stations easier

ZDNet: New Google Maps tools make navigating Sydney’s stations easier. “Google and Transport for New South Wales have teamed up to launch new features on Google Maps to make navigating through Sydney’s 130 train and dozen metro stations easier. One of the new features is indoor Street View imagery that will allow commuters to virtually navigate interactive, panoramic imagery inside Sydney stations.”

Down under, over and all around: Sydney in 3D on Google Earth (Google Blog)

Google Blog: Down under, over and all around: Sydney in 3D on Google Earth. “Google Earth is one of the world’s most comprehensive 3D maps available. In addition to global satellite and terrain coverage, over the past several years we’ve been adding highly detailed 3D imagery of entire cities and towns, from the iconic architecture of cities like New York and Paris to views of landmarks like the Grand Canyon. And now, we’re sharing 3D imagery of central Sydney, Australia!”

Daily Telegraph (Australia): City council releases hundreds of 19th century complaint letters written by Sydney’s most irked residents and ratepayers

Daily Telegraph (Australia): City council releases hundreds of 19th century complaint letters written by Sydney’s most irked residents and ratepayers. “Whinges about neighbours boiling smelly tripe in their backyard and business owners moaning about delays in tramlines being built outside their premises are just two of the thousands of grumbles that can now be accessed through the council’s online archives. The correspondence from irked and irritated Sydneysiders living in areas including Newtown, Camperdown, Pyrmont and Ultimo were found among more than 56,000 hand written letters posted to the council between 1843 and 1899.”

Sydney Opera House Joins Google Cultural Institute

The Sydney Opera House has joined the Google Cultural Institute. “The Google Cultural Institute provides a new digital home for the Sydney Opera House, bringing together more than 1,000 artifacts and 60 years of history in a single online platform. From architect Jørn Utzon’s early designs, to the inner workings of the world’s biggest mechanical organ, to spectacular late night shows, these 50 online exhibits capture the Sydney Opera House from every angle.”

Archive Dedicated to Sydney, Australia Rave Scene, 1990s

New to me, thanks to a tipoff from Reddit: a digital archive dedicated to early 1990s raves in Sydney, Australia. I can’t decide what I like better: the gallery of rave flyers from 1989-1998, the huge collection of rave “mixtapes,” or the surprisingly solid video section (surprising amount of video here, considering that this was pre-ubiquitous-phone-camera.)