Los Angeles Times: ‘Snitch-tagging’ destroys any subtlety that was left on Twitter

Los Angeles Times: ‘Snitch-tagging’ destroys any subtlety that was left on Twitter. “First came Twitter. Then came Twitter fights. Then came Twitter passive aggression: Insults that don’t explicitly identify the person being criticized are so pervasive they have a name, the subtweet. Now that subtlety is being punctured by a rising Twitter behavior — snitch-tagging.”

Marketing Land: Pinterest gives SMBs access to Shop the Look Pins, a free product-tagging tool for organic Pins

Marketing Land: Pinterest gives SMBs access to Shop the Look Pins, a free product-tagging tool for organic Pins. “Pinterest is making Shop the Look Pins, a free product-tagging tool for fashion and home decor Pins, available to anyone with a business account.”

Harvard: Major upgrade for TagTeam, the open-source tagging platform

Harvard: Major upgrade for TagTeam, the open-source tagging platform. “We’re happy to announce a major upgrade to TagTeam, the open-source tagging platform developed by the Harvard Open Access Project. TagTeam allows users to manage open, tag-based research projects on any topic, provide real-time alerts of new developments, and organize knowledge for easy searching and sharing. Unlike other tagging platforms, it lets project owners guide the evolution of their tag vocabulary in a process it calls folksonomy in, ontology out.”

Digital Archive of Children’s Books Subject of Tagging Project

The ABC Books Digital Archive at Princeton was the subject of a large and fascinating tagging project. “ABC Books is a digital archive of over fifty rare and historical children’s alphabet books, available to view page-by-page. The project is primarily pedagogical in nature. Linked to the English Department’s ‘Children’s Literature’ course, it provides an opportunity for enrolled undergraduates to complete digital humanities work for course credit as well as introduces graduate student AIs to teaching and assessing digital humanities work…. During the spring semester 2016, we asked our students to help us develop a comprehensive search function for the site. For the first step, each enrolled student added at least one hundred ‘tags’ to the archive. With well over two hundred students taking the course, we ended up with a staggering 50,000+ tags.”